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California Agriculture, Vol. 18, No.9

Ophyra leucostoma...House Fly Enemy
September 1964
Volume 18, Number 9

Research articles

Biological control possibility for house flies
by J. R. Anderson, J. H. Poorbaugh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One phase of integrated fly control studies on poultry ranches in northern California involves research on several natural enemies of the house fly, Musca domestica L, the little house fly, Fannia canicularis (L), and other nuisance flies The black garbage fly, Ophyra leucostoma (Wied), is one promising, and otherwise harmless, biological control agent Its predaceous larvae kill and feed on house fly maggots and other fly larvae which commonly inhabit chicken droppings Recent studies have shown that one Ophyra larva during its development may kill from 2 to 20 M domestica maggots per day.
One phase of integrated fly control studies on poultry ranches in northern California involves research on several natural enemies of the house fly, Musca domestica L, the little house fly, Fannia canicularis (L), and other nuisance flies The black garbage fly, Ophyra leucostoma (Wied), is one promising, and otherwise harmless, biological control agent Its predaceous larvae kill and feed on house fly maggots and other fly larvae which commonly inhabit chicken droppings Recent studies have shown that one Ophyra larva during its development may kill from 2 to 20 M domestica maggots per day.
Plant rooting studies indicate sclerenchyma tissue is not a restricting factor
by R. M. Sachs, F. Loreti, J. De Bie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many fruit and ornamental plants, uniformity of yield and quality or appearance are achieved only by means of clonal or vegetative propagation-usually by the rooting of stem cuttings. Some varieties are easily rooted, while others are very difficult. There are few explanations to account for such differences in ease-of-rooting, but one long held horticultural hypothesis suggests that stems of shy-rooting plants possess a band of tissue (sclerenchyma) that mechanically blocks protrusion of roots formed to the inside of the sclerenchyma. Results of research reported here show that there is no simple relationship between the density or continuity of the ring of sclerenchyma and ease of rooting in olive, pear, and cherry stem cuttings. Great differences were found in the capacity of stem tissues to form root primordial to the inside of the sclerenchyma ring. Such differences may be related to the ability of cells of the root-initiating tissues to expand and proliferate, and subsequently to organize root primordia.
In many fruit and ornamental plants, uniformity of yield and quality or appearance are achieved only by means of clonal or vegetative propagation-usually by the rooting of stem cuttings. Some varieties are easily rooted, while others are very difficult. There are few explanations to account for such differences in ease-of-rooting, but one long held horticultural hypothesis suggests that stems of shy-rooting plants possess a band of tissue (sclerenchyma) that mechanically blocks protrusion of roots formed to the inside of the sclerenchyma. Results of research reported here show that there is no simple relationship between the density or continuity of the ring of sclerenchyma and ease of rooting in olive, pear, and cherry stem cuttings. Great differences were found in the capacity of stem tissues to form root primordial to the inside of the sclerenchyma ring. Such differences may be related to the ability of cells of the root-initiating tissues to expand and proliferate, and subsequently to organize root primordia.
Toxicity of lithium to plants
by F. T. Bingham, G. R. Bradford, A. L. Page
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Competition for water in California between rapidly expanding industrial-urban activities and agriculture undoubtedly will lead to usage of waters of varying quality. Although standard criteria for water quality are at hand, they do not usually include a consideration of lithium—which may pose a hazard to certain plants. Lithium content may vary widely. For example, a previous report established the presence of lithium in a number of well-water sources, varying in concentrations from 0.05 ppm to 0.50 ppm lithium. Lithium injury in some citrus orchards had been associated with irrigation waters containing concentrations of 0.10 ppm lithium or higher. With information on lithium hazard to economic plants limited thus far to a few citrus orchards, diagnostic criteria are needed, and the effects of lithium on other crops should be studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Competition for water in California between rapidly expanding industrial-urban activities and agriculture undoubtedly will lead to usage of waters of varying quality. Although standard criteria for water quality are at hand, they do not usually include a consideration of lithium—which may pose a hazard to certain plants. Lithium content may vary widely. For example, a previous report established the presence of lithium in a number of well-water sources, varying in concentrations from 0.05 ppm to 0.50 ppm lithium. Lithium injury in some citrus orchards had been associated with irrigation waters containing concentrations of 0.10 ppm lithium or higher. With information on lithium hazard to economic plants limited thus far to a few citrus orchards, diagnostic criteria are needed, and the effects of lithium on other crops should be studied.
Compatibility of almond varieties on Marianna 2624 plum rootstock
by Dale E. Kester, Carl J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vegetatively propagated Marianna 2624 plum is sometimes used as an almond rootstock, primarily because it as greater tolerance (but not immunity) to oak root fungus (Armillaria mellea) than do other stone fruit rootstocks. It is also adapted to heavy, wet soil conditions. The varieties, Texas (Mission), Peerless, the Plus Ultra, Jordanolo and, in most cases, IXL make satisfactory orchard trees on this stock. Tree size is somewhat reduced however, with considerable over-growth occurring at the union. Nonpareil, Davey and Drake are incompatible with Marianna 2624. Additional information reported here is from tests started in 1958 a the compatibility relationships of some ewer commercial almond varieties with Marianna 2624 and the effect of an inter-stock to overcome incompatibility with the commercially desirable Nonpareil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vegetatively propagated Marianna 2624 plum is sometimes used as an almond rootstock, primarily because it as greater tolerance (but not immunity) to oak root fungus (Armillaria mellea) than do other stone fruit rootstocks. It is also adapted to heavy, wet soil conditions. The varieties, Texas (Mission), Peerless, the Plus Ultra, Jordanolo and, in most cases, IXL make satisfactory orchard trees on this stock. Tree size is somewhat reduced however, with considerable over-growth occurring at the union. Nonpareil, Davey and Drake are incompatible with Marianna 2624. Additional information reported here is from tests started in 1958 a the compatibility relationships of some ewer commercial almond varieties with Marianna 2624 and the effect of an inter-stock to overcome incompatibility with the commercially desirable Nonpareil.
Progeny testing bulls
by W. C. Rollins, F. D. Carroll
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Trials with five popular Hereford lines, using commercial cow herds, indicate that significant increases in size, cuttability and yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from round, loin, rib and chuck can be obtained through breeding selection—without impairing carcass quality grade
Trials with five popular Hereford lines, using commercial cow herds, indicate that significant increases in size, cuttability and yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from round, loin, rib and chuck can be obtained through breeding selection—without impairing carcass quality grade
Salt tolerance of safflower
by L. E. Francois, D. M. Yermanos, Leon Bernstein
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.
Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.
Sloping floors for beef cattle feed lots
by S. R. Morrison, W. N. Garrett, C. F. Kelly, T. E. Bond, V. E. Mendel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping feed lot floors as little as 4% degrees allowed manure to accumulate by gravity without adversely affecting weight gains, and with beef cattle spending less time lying on sloppy floors, according to tests at Imperial Valley Field Station
Sloping feed lot floors as little as 4% degrees allowed manure to accumulate by gravity without adversely affecting weight gains, and with beef cattle spending less time lying on sloppy floors, according to tests at Imperial Valley Field Station
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California Agriculture, Vol. 18, No.9

Ophyra leucostoma...House Fly Enemy
September 1964
Volume 18, Number 9

Research articles

Biological control possibility for house flies
by J. R. Anderson, J. H. Poorbaugh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One phase of integrated fly control studies on poultry ranches in northern California involves research on several natural enemies of the house fly, Musca domestica L, the little house fly, Fannia canicularis (L), and other nuisance flies The black garbage fly, Ophyra leucostoma (Wied), is one promising, and otherwise harmless, biological control agent Its predaceous larvae kill and feed on house fly maggots and other fly larvae which commonly inhabit chicken droppings Recent studies have shown that one Ophyra larva during its development may kill from 2 to 20 M domestica maggots per day.
One phase of integrated fly control studies on poultry ranches in northern California involves research on several natural enemies of the house fly, Musca domestica L, the little house fly, Fannia canicularis (L), and other nuisance flies The black garbage fly, Ophyra leucostoma (Wied), is one promising, and otherwise harmless, biological control agent Its predaceous larvae kill and feed on house fly maggots and other fly larvae which commonly inhabit chicken droppings Recent studies have shown that one Ophyra larva during its development may kill from 2 to 20 M domestica maggots per day.
Plant rooting studies indicate sclerenchyma tissue is not a restricting factor
by R. M. Sachs, F. Loreti, J. De Bie
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In many fruit and ornamental plants, uniformity of yield and quality or appearance are achieved only by means of clonal or vegetative propagation-usually by the rooting of stem cuttings. Some varieties are easily rooted, while others are very difficult. There are few explanations to account for such differences in ease-of-rooting, but one long held horticultural hypothesis suggests that stems of shy-rooting plants possess a band of tissue (sclerenchyma) that mechanically blocks protrusion of roots formed to the inside of the sclerenchyma. Results of research reported here show that there is no simple relationship between the density or continuity of the ring of sclerenchyma and ease of rooting in olive, pear, and cherry stem cuttings. Great differences were found in the capacity of stem tissues to form root primordial to the inside of the sclerenchyma ring. Such differences may be related to the ability of cells of the root-initiating tissues to expand and proliferate, and subsequently to organize root primordia.
In many fruit and ornamental plants, uniformity of yield and quality or appearance are achieved only by means of clonal or vegetative propagation-usually by the rooting of stem cuttings. Some varieties are easily rooted, while others are very difficult. There are few explanations to account for such differences in ease-of-rooting, but one long held horticultural hypothesis suggests that stems of shy-rooting plants possess a band of tissue (sclerenchyma) that mechanically blocks protrusion of roots formed to the inside of the sclerenchyma. Results of research reported here show that there is no simple relationship between the density or continuity of the ring of sclerenchyma and ease of rooting in olive, pear, and cherry stem cuttings. Great differences were found in the capacity of stem tissues to form root primordial to the inside of the sclerenchyma ring. Such differences may be related to the ability of cells of the root-initiating tissues to expand and proliferate, and subsequently to organize root primordia.
Toxicity of lithium to plants
by F. T. Bingham, G. R. Bradford, A. L. Page
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Competition for water in California between rapidly expanding industrial-urban activities and agriculture undoubtedly will lead to usage of waters of varying quality. Although standard criteria for water quality are at hand, they do not usually include a consideration of lithium—which may pose a hazard to certain plants. Lithium content may vary widely. For example, a previous report established the presence of lithium in a number of well-water sources, varying in concentrations from 0.05 ppm to 0.50 ppm lithium. Lithium injury in some citrus orchards had been associated with irrigation waters containing concentrations of 0.10 ppm lithium or higher. With information on lithium hazard to economic plants limited thus far to a few citrus orchards, diagnostic criteria are needed, and the effects of lithium on other crops should be studied.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Competition for water in California between rapidly expanding industrial-urban activities and agriculture undoubtedly will lead to usage of waters of varying quality. Although standard criteria for water quality are at hand, they do not usually include a consideration of lithium—which may pose a hazard to certain plants. Lithium content may vary widely. For example, a previous report established the presence of lithium in a number of well-water sources, varying in concentrations from 0.05 ppm to 0.50 ppm lithium. Lithium injury in some citrus orchards had been associated with irrigation waters containing concentrations of 0.10 ppm lithium or higher. With information on lithium hazard to economic plants limited thus far to a few citrus orchards, diagnostic criteria are needed, and the effects of lithium on other crops should be studied.
Compatibility of almond varieties on Marianna 2624 plum rootstock
by Dale E. Kester, Carl J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vegetatively propagated Marianna 2624 plum is sometimes used as an almond rootstock, primarily because it as greater tolerance (but not immunity) to oak root fungus (Armillaria mellea) than do other stone fruit rootstocks. It is also adapted to heavy, wet soil conditions. The varieties, Texas (Mission), Peerless, the Plus Ultra, Jordanolo and, in most cases, IXL make satisfactory orchard trees on this stock. Tree size is somewhat reduced however, with considerable over-growth occurring at the union. Nonpareil, Davey and Drake are incompatible with Marianna 2624. Additional information reported here is from tests started in 1958 a the compatibility relationships of some ewer commercial almond varieties with Marianna 2624 and the effect of an inter-stock to overcome incompatibility with the commercially desirable Nonpareil.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vegetatively propagated Marianna 2624 plum is sometimes used as an almond rootstock, primarily because it as greater tolerance (but not immunity) to oak root fungus (Armillaria mellea) than do other stone fruit rootstocks. It is also adapted to heavy, wet soil conditions. The varieties, Texas (Mission), Peerless, the Plus Ultra, Jordanolo and, in most cases, IXL make satisfactory orchard trees on this stock. Tree size is somewhat reduced however, with considerable over-growth occurring at the union. Nonpareil, Davey and Drake are incompatible with Marianna 2624. Additional information reported here is from tests started in 1958 a the compatibility relationships of some ewer commercial almond varieties with Marianna 2624 and the effect of an inter-stock to overcome incompatibility with the commercially desirable Nonpareil.
Progeny testing bulls
by W. C. Rollins, F. D. Carroll
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Trials with five popular Hereford lines, using commercial cow herds, indicate that significant increases in size, cuttability and yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from round, loin, rib and chuck can be obtained through breeding selection—without impairing carcass quality grade
Trials with five popular Hereford lines, using commercial cow herds, indicate that significant increases in size, cuttability and yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from round, loin, rib and chuck can be obtained through breeding selection—without impairing carcass quality grade
Salt tolerance of safflower
by L. E. Francois, D. M. Yermanos, Leon Bernstein
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.
Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.
Sloping floors for beef cattle feed lots
by S. R. Morrison, W. N. Garrett, C. F. Kelly, T. E. Bond, V. E. Mendel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sloping feed lot floors as little as 4% degrees allowed manure to accumulate by gravity without adversely affecting weight gains, and with beef cattle spending less time lying on sloppy floors, according to tests at Imperial Valley Field Station
Sloping feed lot floors as little as 4% degrees allowed manure to accumulate by gravity without adversely affecting weight gains, and with beef cattle spending less time lying on sloppy floors, according to tests at Imperial Valley Field Station

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