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Salt tolerance of safflower

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Authors

L. E. Francois, U. S. Salinity Laboratory
D. M. Yermanos, Department of Agronomy, University of California
Leon Bernstein, U. S. Salinity Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(9):12-14.

Published September 01, 1964

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Abstract

Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.

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Author notes

This study is part of the research being conducted by the Salinity Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Riverside, California, and the University of California at Riverside.

Salt tolerance of safflower

L. E. Francois, D. M. Yermanos, Leon Bernstein
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Salt tolerance of safflower

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

L. E. Francois, U. S. Salinity Laboratory
D. M. Yermanos, Department of Agronomy, University of California
Leon Bernstein, U. S. Salinity Laboratory

Publication Information

California Agriculture 18(9):12-14.

Published September 01, 1964

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Safflower is highly salt tolerant, according to results of field plot experiments in 1962 and 1963 However, safflower appears to be only about half as salt tolerant during germination as during later stages of growth Salinity decreases the oil percentage of the seed, but oil quality is unaffected.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This study is part of the research being conducted by the Salinity Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Riverside, California, and the University of California at Riverside.


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