California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 18, No.8

Turfgrass Research
August 1964
Volume 18, Number 8

Research articles

Controlling dry spots on golf greens
by F. W. Dorman, C. L. Hemstreet, T. M. Little
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.
Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.
Soil profile studies aid water management for salinity control
by D. R. Nielsen, J. W. Biggar, R. J. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaching of soluble salts—necessary for sustained irrigated agriculture—is accomplished by allowing some surface applied water to pass completely through the crop root zone. Although leaching is often carried out to a limited degree with each application of irrigation water, it is sometimes only possible to leach annually or less frequently, depending upon the crop grown, water supply and other local conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaching of soluble salts—necessary for sustained irrigated agriculture—is accomplished by allowing some surface applied water to pass completely through the crop root zone. Although leaching is often carried out to a limited degree with each application of irrigation water, it is sometimes only possible to leach annually or less frequently, depending upon the crop grown, water supply and other local conditions.
Growth and quality of sugar beets at the Antelope Valley Field Station
by F. J. Hills, D. M. May, W. D. Burge, R. S. Loomis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sugar beets responded to decreasing fall temperatures with an abrupt slowdown in both root and top growth but also with increases in the sucrose Concentration of roots, according to this test in northern 10s Angeles County. Plants that became deficient in nitrogen in mid-August produced roots as well as those kept supplied with nitrogen throughout the fall; and on December 5, roots of N-deficient plants contained 2.7 percentage points more sucrose than roots of high-nitrogen plants.
Sugar beets responded to decreasing fall temperatures with an abrupt slowdown in both root and top growth but also with increases in the sucrose Concentration of roots, according to this test in northern 10s Angeles County. Plants that became deficient in nitrogen in mid-August produced roots as well as those kept supplied with nitrogen throughout the fall; and on December 5, roots of N-deficient plants contained 2.7 percentage points more sucrose than roots of high-nitrogen plants.
Effects of cold on cereal crops
by C. A. Suneso, M. D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.
Plastic and petroleum mulches for cotton as affected by soil type and location
by V. Q. Hale, J. R. Stockton, L. Dickens
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The effectiveness of plastic and petroleum mulches did not change in tests at two different locations on two different soil types in San Joaquin Valley cotton fields. Higher soil temperatures generated by all of the mulch test treatments resulted in earlier cotton germination and faster development, but ultimate plant sizes were the same. The mulches did not affect cotton quality, but shifted a greater percentage of the yield into the first picking. Although yield increases alone may not return the cost of treatment, reductions in hand labor made possible through precision planting as part of the mulching operation offer some compensation.
The effectiveness of plastic and petroleum mulches did not change in tests at two different locations on two different soil types in San Joaquin Valley cotton fields. Higher soil temperatures generated by all of the mulch test treatments resulted in earlier cotton germination and faster development, but ultimate plant sizes were the same. The mulches did not affect cotton quality, but shifted a greater percentage of the yield into the first picking. Although yield increases alone may not return the cost of treatment, reductions in hand labor made possible through precision planting as part of the mulching operation offer some compensation.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=18_8

California Agriculture, Vol. 18, No.8

Turfgrass Research
August 1964
Volume 18, Number 8

Research articles

Controlling dry spots on golf greens
by F. W. Dorman, C. L. Hemstreet, T. M. Little
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.
Monthly aerifying was an aid to controlling the development of dry spots and did not cause cumulative injury on a Seaside bentgrass green during 1963 summer tests in San Bernardino County. Verticutting during the summer heat caused some injury to this fine turfgrass, but was also of some value in controlling dry spot development as thatch built up late in the season. Wetting agents aided in controlling dry spot development, but were detrimental to the appearance of the turf on this green. The tests also proved that it is possible to conduct complex experimental work on golf greens, if the management and players understand the importance of the work and the research is scheduled to cause a minimum of inconvenience to the golfers. Inexperienced judges were found capable of appraising visual effects of different management practices on the turf.
Soil profile studies aid water management for salinity control
by D. R. Nielsen, J. W. Biggar, R. J. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaching of soluble salts—necessary for sustained irrigated agriculture—is accomplished by allowing some surface applied water to pass completely through the crop root zone. Although leaching is often carried out to a limited degree with each application of irrigation water, it is sometimes only possible to leach annually or less frequently, depending upon the crop grown, water supply and other local conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaching of soluble salts—necessary for sustained irrigated agriculture—is accomplished by allowing some surface applied water to pass completely through the crop root zone. Although leaching is often carried out to a limited degree with each application of irrigation water, it is sometimes only possible to leach annually or less frequently, depending upon the crop grown, water supply and other local conditions.
Growth and quality of sugar beets at the Antelope Valley Field Station
by F. J. Hills, D. M. May, W. D. Burge, R. S. Loomis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sugar beets responded to decreasing fall temperatures with an abrupt slowdown in both root and top growth but also with increases in the sucrose Concentration of roots, according to this test in northern 10s Angeles County. Plants that became deficient in nitrogen in mid-August produced roots as well as those kept supplied with nitrogen throughout the fall; and on December 5, roots of N-deficient plants contained 2.7 percentage points more sucrose than roots of high-nitrogen plants.
Sugar beets responded to decreasing fall temperatures with an abrupt slowdown in both root and top growth but also with increases in the sucrose Concentration of roots, according to this test in northern 10s Angeles County. Plants that became deficient in nitrogen in mid-August produced roots as well as those kept supplied with nitrogen throughout the fall; and on December 5, roots of N-deficient plants contained 2.7 percentage points more sucrose than roots of high-nitrogen plants.
Effects of cold on cereal crops
by C. A. Suneso, M. D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Frost damage to the floral parts of grain heads (prior to, during and immediately after pollination) is surprisingly common in California, other mountain states, and many cereal-growing areas in the world. Development of early maturing varieties has intensified the problem in all areas, particularly where cereals are fall sown. Many seed and fruit crops also can be damaged by frost. Most plants are extremely sensitive to temperature in stages of rapid growth and reproduction. This is especially true of plant reproductive organs.
Plastic and petroleum mulches for cotton as affected by soil type and location
by V. Q. Hale, J. R. Stockton, L. Dickens
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The effectiveness of plastic and petroleum mulches did not change in tests at two different locations on two different soil types in San Joaquin Valley cotton fields. Higher soil temperatures generated by all of the mulch test treatments resulted in earlier cotton germination and faster development, but ultimate plant sizes were the same. The mulches did not affect cotton quality, but shifted a greater percentage of the yield into the first picking. Although yield increases alone may not return the cost of treatment, reductions in hand labor made possible through precision planting as part of the mulching operation offer some compensation.
The effectiveness of plastic and petroleum mulches did not change in tests at two different locations on two different soil types in San Joaquin Valley cotton fields. Higher soil temperatures generated by all of the mulch test treatments resulted in earlier cotton germination and faster development, but ultimate plant sizes were the same. The mulches did not affect cotton quality, but shifted a greater percentage of the yield into the first picking. Although yield increases alone may not return the cost of treatment, reductions in hand labor made possible through precision planting as part of the mulching operation offer some compensation.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/