California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

July 1964
Volume 18, Number 7

Research articles

Sesame an oilseed crop with potential in California
by D. M. Yermanos, R. T. Edwards, S. C. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sesame is probably the oldest cultivated oil crop with a wide distribution in the tropical and subtropical regions. It is mentioned in the old Hebrew and Egyptian scripts and the ancient Sanskrit literature. Some of the earliest references to sesame culture were made by the ancient Greek writers Theophrastus (4th century B.C.) and Solon (7th century B.C.). Sesame was introduced into the United States from Africa during the 17th century.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sesame is probably the oldest cultivated oil crop with a wide distribution in the tropical and subtropical regions. It is mentioned in the old Hebrew and Egyptian scripts and the ancient Sanskrit literature. Some of the earliest references to sesame culture were made by the ancient Greek writers Theophrastus (4th century B.C.) and Solon (7th century B.C.). Sesame was introduced into the United States from Africa during the 17th century.
Lateral pressure effects on… hay wafer storage structures
by L. W. Neubauer, J. B. Dobie, R. G. Curley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Storage facilities being constructed or remodeled to contain hay wafers rather than bales, must have walls designed to withstand the increased lateral pressures created by the greater density and flowability of the wafers. This study suggests possible design standards for wall strength in rectangular storage buildings.
Storage facilities being constructed or remodeled to contain hay wafers rather than bales, must have walls designed to withstand the increased lateral pressures created by the greater density and flowability of the wafers. This study suggests possible design standards for wall strength in rectangular storage buildings.
Development of scion roots on old home pear trunks
by R. L. Rackham, G. W. Morehead
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Application of a rooting hormone to encourage early scion root initiation may eventually result in elimination of a need for the bud union between the Old Home pear trunk and the original rootstock and will establish the trees on a more vigorous root system, according to tests detailed in this progress report of field research by Extension Service staff members.
Application of a rooting hormone to encourage early scion root initiation may eventually result in elimination of a need for the bud union between the Old Home pear trunk and the original rootstock and will establish the trees on a more vigorous root system, according to tests detailed in this progress report of field research by Extension Service staff members.
Stress and crowding as causes of potato defects
by B. J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A well-distributed crop of potatoes is shown developing from plant shown in first photo to right. The soil has been removed by air blast and tubers left in natural position. Note that stolons are long enough to allow space for smooth development. Rhizoctonia often strikes late in the season, as shown in middle photo. These tubers reached about 3 oz in size by mid-August. At this time, rhizoctonia completely severed the stolons at the locations shown beneath the white pieces of paper. From August until harvest tops remained green but tuber growth remained as seen. In third photo to right, a young plant shows well-developed stolons and a good first set of potato tubers. Few pressure defects will develop in such a hill.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A well-distributed crop of potatoes is shown developing from plant shown in first photo to right. The soil has been removed by air blast and tubers left in natural position. Note that stolons are long enough to allow space for smooth development. Rhizoctonia often strikes late in the season, as shown in middle photo. These tubers reached about 3 oz in size by mid-August. At this time, rhizoctonia completely severed the stolons at the locations shown beneath the white pieces of paper. From August until harvest tops remained green but tuber growth remained as seen. In third photo to right, a young plant shows well-developed stolons and a good first set of potato tubers. Few pressure defects will develop in such a hill.
Cling peach irrigation
by K. Uriu, L. Werenfels, G. Post, A. Retan, D. Fox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation recommendations fo,r peaches have been based mainly on experimental work carried out 30 to 40 years ago. Today's yield potentials make these early recommendations questionable. A higher level of soil moisture has been found to result in larger fruit size and increased vegetative growth.
Irrigation recommendations fo,r peaches have been based mainly on experimental work carried out 30 to 40 years ago. Today's yield potentials make these early recommendations questionable. A higher level of soil moisture has been found to result in larger fruit size and increased vegetative growth.
Systemic insecticides reduce the spread of curly top virus of sugar beets
by G. P. Georghiou, E. F. Laird, A. F. Van Maren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Curly top virus of sugar beet, named for the severe curling and distortion it causes to the leaves of infected plants, is transmitted through the feeding activities of the beet leaf hopper (Circulifer tenellus, Baker). Because the virus can be transmitted in only a few minutes of feeding, control of the leafhopper could theoretically be achieved only by insecticides which kill faster than it takes the insect to complete a transmission feeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Curly top virus of sugar beet, named for the severe curling and distortion it causes to the leaves of infected plants, is transmitted through the feeding activities of the beet leaf hopper (Circulifer tenellus, Baker). Because the virus can be transmitted in only a few minutes of feeding, control of the leafhopper could theoretically be achieved only by insecticides which kill faster than it takes the insect to complete a transmission feeding.
Gibberellin sprays delay lime maturity
by R. Burns, D. O. Rosedale, J. E. Pehrson, C. W. Cogins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Preliminary trials indicate that gibberellic acid sprays will delay maturity of limes as well as lemons (California Agriculture, January, 1964). In southern California, Bearss lime trees bear some fruit most of the year, but much of the crop colors and ripens in the fall and winter and must be picked. As with lemons, the lime industry would benefit if more fruit matured later in the season when the demand is greater.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Preliminary trials indicate that gibberellic acid sprays will delay maturity of limes as well as lemons (California Agriculture, January, 1964). In southern California, Bearss lime trees bear some fruit most of the year, but much of the crop colors and ripens in the fall and winter and must be picked. As with lemons, the lime industry would benefit if more fruit matured later in the season when the demand is greater.
Clover establishment in Northern California
by A. A. Holland
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A survey of 26 northern counties has shown that pastures of rose clover {Tri-folium hirtum) and subterranean clover (T. subterraneum) establish and produce a high quality forage under a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions when they are inoculated with the appropriate root-nodule bacteria and properly fertilized with sulfur or phosphorus where needed. However, there have been a number of failures associated with early nitrogen deficiency in the legume followed by the death of the plants. In certain cases this can be attributed to faulty handling of the cultures of root-nodule bacteria or improper sowing practices. These factors have led to the desiccation and death of the root nodule bacteria on the seed, nodulation failure of the legume and failure of the pasture. Information is being assembled to acquaint ranchers with sound inoculation and sowing techniques in collaboration with J. Street, extension range improvement specialist.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A survey of 26 northern counties has shown that pastures of rose clover {Tri-folium hirtum) and subterranean clover (T. subterraneum) establish and produce a high quality forage under a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions when they are inoculated with the appropriate root-nodule bacteria and properly fertilized with sulfur or phosphorus where needed. However, there have been a number of failures associated with early nitrogen deficiency in the legume followed by the death of the plants. In certain cases this can be attributed to faulty handling of the cultures of root-nodule bacteria or improper sowing practices. These factors have led to the desiccation and death of the root nodule bacteria on the seed, nodulation failure of the legume and failure of the pasture. Information is being assembled to acquaint ranchers with sound inoculation and sowing techniques in collaboration with J. Street, extension range improvement specialist.
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July 1964
Volume 18, Number 7

Research articles

Sesame an oilseed crop with potential in California
by D. M. Yermanos, R. T. Edwards, S. C. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sesame is probably the oldest cultivated oil crop with a wide distribution in the tropical and subtropical regions. It is mentioned in the old Hebrew and Egyptian scripts and the ancient Sanskrit literature. Some of the earliest references to sesame culture were made by the ancient Greek writers Theophrastus (4th century B.C.) and Solon (7th century B.C.). Sesame was introduced into the United States from Africa during the 17th century.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sesame is probably the oldest cultivated oil crop with a wide distribution in the tropical and subtropical regions. It is mentioned in the old Hebrew and Egyptian scripts and the ancient Sanskrit literature. Some of the earliest references to sesame culture were made by the ancient Greek writers Theophrastus (4th century B.C.) and Solon (7th century B.C.). Sesame was introduced into the United States from Africa during the 17th century.
Lateral pressure effects on… hay wafer storage structures
by L. W. Neubauer, J. B. Dobie, R. G. Curley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Storage facilities being constructed or remodeled to contain hay wafers rather than bales, must have walls designed to withstand the increased lateral pressures created by the greater density and flowability of the wafers. This study suggests possible design standards for wall strength in rectangular storage buildings.
Storage facilities being constructed or remodeled to contain hay wafers rather than bales, must have walls designed to withstand the increased lateral pressures created by the greater density and flowability of the wafers. This study suggests possible design standards for wall strength in rectangular storage buildings.
Development of scion roots on old home pear trunks
by R. L. Rackham, G. W. Morehead
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Application of a rooting hormone to encourage early scion root initiation may eventually result in elimination of a need for the bud union between the Old Home pear trunk and the original rootstock and will establish the trees on a more vigorous root system, according to tests detailed in this progress report of field research by Extension Service staff members.
Application of a rooting hormone to encourage early scion root initiation may eventually result in elimination of a need for the bud union between the Old Home pear trunk and the original rootstock and will establish the trees on a more vigorous root system, according to tests detailed in this progress report of field research by Extension Service staff members.
Stress and crowding as causes of potato defects
by B. J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A well-distributed crop of potatoes is shown developing from plant shown in first photo to right. The soil has been removed by air blast and tubers left in natural position. Note that stolons are long enough to allow space for smooth development. Rhizoctonia often strikes late in the season, as shown in middle photo. These tubers reached about 3 oz in size by mid-August. At this time, rhizoctonia completely severed the stolons at the locations shown beneath the white pieces of paper. From August until harvest tops remained green but tuber growth remained as seen. In third photo to right, a young plant shows well-developed stolons and a good first set of potato tubers. Few pressure defects will develop in such a hill.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A well-distributed crop of potatoes is shown developing from plant shown in first photo to right. The soil has been removed by air blast and tubers left in natural position. Note that stolons are long enough to allow space for smooth development. Rhizoctonia often strikes late in the season, as shown in middle photo. These tubers reached about 3 oz in size by mid-August. At this time, rhizoctonia completely severed the stolons at the locations shown beneath the white pieces of paper. From August until harvest tops remained green but tuber growth remained as seen. In third photo to right, a young plant shows well-developed stolons and a good first set of potato tubers. Few pressure defects will develop in such a hill.
Cling peach irrigation
by K. Uriu, L. Werenfels, G. Post, A. Retan, D. Fox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Irrigation recommendations fo,r peaches have been based mainly on experimental work carried out 30 to 40 years ago. Today's yield potentials make these early recommendations questionable. A higher level of soil moisture has been found to result in larger fruit size and increased vegetative growth.
Irrigation recommendations fo,r peaches have been based mainly on experimental work carried out 30 to 40 years ago. Today's yield potentials make these early recommendations questionable. A higher level of soil moisture has been found to result in larger fruit size and increased vegetative growth.
Systemic insecticides reduce the spread of curly top virus of sugar beets
by G. P. Georghiou, E. F. Laird, A. F. Van Maren
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Curly top virus of sugar beet, named for the severe curling and distortion it causes to the leaves of infected plants, is transmitted through the feeding activities of the beet leaf hopper (Circulifer tenellus, Baker). Because the virus can be transmitted in only a few minutes of feeding, control of the leafhopper could theoretically be achieved only by insecticides which kill faster than it takes the insect to complete a transmission feeding.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Curly top virus of sugar beet, named for the severe curling and distortion it causes to the leaves of infected plants, is transmitted through the feeding activities of the beet leaf hopper (Circulifer tenellus, Baker). Because the virus can be transmitted in only a few minutes of feeding, control of the leafhopper could theoretically be achieved only by insecticides which kill faster than it takes the insect to complete a transmission feeding.
Gibberellin sprays delay lime maturity
by R. Burns, D. O. Rosedale, J. E. Pehrson, C. W. Cogins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Preliminary trials indicate that gibberellic acid sprays will delay maturity of limes as well as lemons (California Agriculture, January, 1964). In southern California, Bearss lime trees bear some fruit most of the year, but much of the crop colors and ripens in the fall and winter and must be picked. As with lemons, the lime industry would benefit if more fruit matured later in the season when the demand is greater.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Preliminary trials indicate that gibberellic acid sprays will delay maturity of limes as well as lemons (California Agriculture, January, 1964). In southern California, Bearss lime trees bear some fruit most of the year, but much of the crop colors and ripens in the fall and winter and must be picked. As with lemons, the lime industry would benefit if more fruit matured later in the season when the demand is greater.
Clover establishment in Northern California
by A. A. Holland
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A survey of 26 northern counties has shown that pastures of rose clover {Tri-folium hirtum) and subterranean clover (T. subterraneum) establish and produce a high quality forage under a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions when they are inoculated with the appropriate root-nodule bacteria and properly fertilized with sulfur or phosphorus where needed. However, there have been a number of failures associated with early nitrogen deficiency in the legume followed by the death of the plants. In certain cases this can be attributed to faulty handling of the cultures of root-nodule bacteria or improper sowing practices. These factors have led to the desiccation and death of the root nodule bacteria on the seed, nodulation failure of the legume and failure of the pasture. Information is being assembled to acquaint ranchers with sound inoculation and sowing techniques in collaboration with J. Street, extension range improvement specialist.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A survey of 26 northern counties has shown that pastures of rose clover {Tri-folium hirtum) and subterranean clover (T. subterraneum) establish and produce a high quality forage under a wide variety of soil and climatic conditions when they are inoculated with the appropriate root-nodule bacteria and properly fertilized with sulfur or phosphorus where needed. However, there have been a number of failures associated with early nitrogen deficiency in the legume followed by the death of the plants. In certain cases this can be attributed to faulty handling of the cultures of root-nodule bacteria or improper sowing practices. These factors have led to the desiccation and death of the root nodule bacteria on the seed, nodulation failure of the legume and failure of the pasture. Information is being assembled to acquaint ranchers with sound inoculation and sowing techniques in collaboration with J. Street, extension range improvement specialist.

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