California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 14, No.11

Forage production on irrigated pastures
November 1960
Volume 14, Number 11

Research articles

Imported french parasite of walnut aphid established in California
by E. I. Schlinger, K. S. Hagen, R. Van den Bosch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Imported from in 1959, a tiny wasp—Trioxys pallidus Haliday—a natural parasitic enemy of the walnut aphid—Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach)—has become established, at least locally, in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Imported from in 1959, a tiny wasp—Trioxys pallidus Haliday—a natural parasitic enemy of the walnut aphid—Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach)—has become established, at least locally, in California.
Potentially serious cotton disease angular leaf spot established in California
by W. C. Schnathorst, P. M. Halisky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Angular leaf spot of cotton is caused by the bacterium—Xanthomonas malvacearum—which enters the plant through wounds or natural openings. Circular translucent lesions on cotyledons, angular lesions on leaves, systemic infection of leaves, stem lesions, and boll rot—all caused by the pathogen—have been observed in California. Yield of cotton may be affected by the disease indirectly, by stunting and premature defoliation of plants, or directly, by loss of bolls due to boll rot.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Angular leaf spot of cotton is caused by the bacterium—Xanthomonas malvacearum—which enters the plant through wounds or natural openings. Circular translucent lesions on cotyledons, angular lesions on leaves, systemic infection of leaves, stem lesions, and boll rot—all caused by the pathogen—have been observed in California. Yield of cotton may be affected by the disease indirectly, by stunting and premature defoliation of plants, or directly, by loss of bolls due to boll rot.
Nitrogen fertilization of irrigated pastures to improve forage production capacity
by Maurice L. Peterson, Leo E. Bendixen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing production costs are forcing many growers to consider nitrogen fertilization as one means of increasing yields of irrigated pastures.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing production costs are forcing many growers to consider nitrogen fertilization as one means of increasing yields of irrigated pastures.
Picking efficiency of cotton picker improved by unsynchronized speeds
by L. M. Carter, J. R. Tavernetti
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Picking efficiency of barbed-spindle cotton pickers was increased an average of 2.5% in a field test in the San Joaquin Valley.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Picking efficiency of barbed-spindle cotton pickers was increased an average of 2.5% in a field test in the San Joaquin Valley.
Cattle feeding trials with acorns and oak leaves indicate need for supplementing dry range forage
by Kenneth A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The incidence of deformed calves—acorn calves—has decreased with the widening use of supplemental range feeding and improved breeding herd management. Some stockmen operating in oak areas in California have long considered that consumption of acorns by pregnant range cattle contributed to the birth of deformed calves, to loss of weight, abortions, and even death. Other stockmen have claimed acorns were not harmful but were good cattle feed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The incidence of deformed calves—acorn calves—has decreased with the widening use of supplemental range feeding and improved breeding herd management. Some stockmen operating in oak areas in California have long considered that consumption of acorns by pregnant range cattle contributed to the birth of deformed calves, to loss of weight, abortions, and even death. Other stockmen have claimed acorns were not harmful but were good cattle feed.
Nutritional needs of fruit trees indicated by leaf analysis
by Omund Lilleland, K. Uriu
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies and excesses of essential elements occur in various California orchards. A major research project is aimed at detecting those faults and restoring the fruit trees to healthy and profitable condition.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies and excesses of essential elements occur in various California orchards. A major research project is aimed at detecting those faults and restoring the fruit trees to healthy and profitable condition.
Plant breeding of commercial peppers for disease resistance
by Paul G. Smith, L. F. Lippert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many forms of peppers varying widely in fruit size, shape, flavor, color and pungency are encompassed in the genus Capsicum. The commercial types grown in California include Bell or sweet peppers and Floral Gem for the fresh market and for processing; pimiento for processing; and pungent chili types for the fresh market, for canning, and dehydration.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many forms of peppers varying widely in fruit size, shape, flavor, color and pungency are encompassed in the genus Capsicum. The commercial types grown in California include Bell or sweet peppers and Floral Gem for the fresh market and for processing; pimiento for processing; and pungent chili types for the fresh market, for canning, and dehydration.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=14_11

California Agriculture, Vol. 14, No.11

Forage production on irrigated pastures
November 1960
Volume 14, Number 11

Research articles

Imported french parasite of walnut aphid established in California
by E. I. Schlinger, K. S. Hagen, R. Van den Bosch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Imported from in 1959, a tiny wasp—Trioxys pallidus Haliday—a natural parasitic enemy of the walnut aphid—Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach)—has become established, at least locally, in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Imported from in 1959, a tiny wasp—Trioxys pallidus Haliday—a natural parasitic enemy of the walnut aphid—Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach)—has become established, at least locally, in California.
Potentially serious cotton disease angular leaf spot established in California
by W. C. Schnathorst, P. M. Halisky
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Angular leaf spot of cotton is caused by the bacterium—Xanthomonas malvacearum—which enters the plant through wounds or natural openings. Circular translucent lesions on cotyledons, angular lesions on leaves, systemic infection of leaves, stem lesions, and boll rot—all caused by the pathogen—have been observed in California. Yield of cotton may be affected by the disease indirectly, by stunting and premature defoliation of plants, or directly, by loss of bolls due to boll rot.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Angular leaf spot of cotton is caused by the bacterium—Xanthomonas malvacearum—which enters the plant through wounds or natural openings. Circular translucent lesions on cotyledons, angular lesions on leaves, systemic infection of leaves, stem lesions, and boll rot—all caused by the pathogen—have been observed in California. Yield of cotton may be affected by the disease indirectly, by stunting and premature defoliation of plants, or directly, by loss of bolls due to boll rot.
Nitrogen fertilization of irrigated pastures to improve forage production capacity
by Maurice L. Peterson, Leo E. Bendixen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing production costs are forcing many growers to consider nitrogen fertilization as one means of increasing yields of irrigated pastures.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing production costs are forcing many growers to consider nitrogen fertilization as one means of increasing yields of irrigated pastures.
Picking efficiency of cotton picker improved by unsynchronized speeds
by L. M. Carter, J. R. Tavernetti
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Picking efficiency of barbed-spindle cotton pickers was increased an average of 2.5% in a field test in the San Joaquin Valley.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Picking efficiency of barbed-spindle cotton pickers was increased an average of 2.5% in a field test in the San Joaquin Valley.
Cattle feeding trials with acorns and oak leaves indicate need for supplementing dry range forage
by Kenneth A. Wagnon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The incidence of deformed calves—acorn calves—has decreased with the widening use of supplemental range feeding and improved breeding herd management. Some stockmen operating in oak areas in California have long considered that consumption of acorns by pregnant range cattle contributed to the birth of deformed calves, to loss of weight, abortions, and even death. Other stockmen have claimed acorns were not harmful but were good cattle feed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The incidence of deformed calves—acorn calves—has decreased with the widening use of supplemental range feeding and improved breeding herd management. Some stockmen operating in oak areas in California have long considered that consumption of acorns by pregnant range cattle contributed to the birth of deformed calves, to loss of weight, abortions, and even death. Other stockmen have claimed acorns were not harmful but were good cattle feed.
Nutritional needs of fruit trees indicated by leaf analysis
by Omund Lilleland, K. Uriu
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies and excesses of essential elements occur in various California orchards. A major research project is aimed at detecting those faults and restoring the fruit trees to healthy and profitable condition.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies and excesses of essential elements occur in various California orchards. A major research project is aimed at detecting those faults and restoring the fruit trees to healthy and profitable condition.
Plant breeding of commercial peppers for disease resistance
by Paul G. Smith, L. F. Lippert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many forms of peppers varying widely in fruit size, shape, flavor, color and pungency are encompassed in the genus Capsicum. The commercial types grown in California include Bell or sweet peppers and Floral Gem for the fresh market and for processing; pimiento for processing; and pungent chili types for the fresh market, for canning, and dehydration.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many forms of peppers varying widely in fruit size, shape, flavor, color and pungency are encompassed in the genus Capsicum. The commercial types grown in California include Bell or sweet peppers and Floral Gem for the fresh market and for processing; pimiento for processing; and pungent chili types for the fresh market, for canning, and dehydration.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/