California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 14, No.1

One-man handling equipment in citrus orchard
January 1960
Volume 14, Number 1

Research articles

Some growers participate in cooperative canneries other growers prefer to sell to private canneries
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Participation in cooperative canning usually offers a grower the advantage of an assured outlet for his raw product, because cooperative canneries generally stand ready to receive his crop for processing, regardless of the market situation. Thus the grower's risk of not having an outlet for his product may be reduced or even eliminated.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Participation in cooperative canning usually offers a grower the advantage of an assured outlet for his raw product, because cooperative canneries generally stand ready to receive his crop for processing, regardless of the market situation. Thus the grower's risk of not having an outlet for his product may be reduced or even eliminated.
New method for handling citrus fruits from orchard to packing house uses simple equipment
by Roy J. Smith, Russell L. Perry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One-man operation of equipment for loading and unloading bins, and for moving the equipment up and down the box roads, is the essential element in a new method of handling citrus fruits between the orchard and the packing house.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One-man operation of equipment for loading and unloading bins, and for moving the equipment up and down the box roads, is the essential element in a new method of handling citrus fruits between the orchard and the packing house.
Water stress and leaf drop: Healthy appearing leaves dropped by small orange trees after applied soil moisture ended induced periods of water stress
by R. T. Wedding, L. C. Erickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Extremely heavy leaf drop has affected young orange trees in some inland areas of southern California in recent years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Extremely heavy leaf drop has affected young orange trees in some inland areas of southern California in recent years.
Biological control of insect pests aided by strip-farming alfalfa in experimental program
by E. I. Schlinger, E. J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Biological control of the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculala (Buckton)—in California became a rapid success after three species of parasites were introduced in 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Biological control of the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculala (Buckton)—in California became a rapid success after three species of parasites were introduced in 1956.
Vacuum cleaner principle applied in sampling insect populations in alfalfa fields by new machine method
by E. J. Dietrick, E. I. Schlinger, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accurate estimates of the total insect population of an alfalfa field can be obtained by the use of newly developed equipment and sampling techniques. All species of insects—each in relation to the whole as well as one to another—and measurement of the separate life stages, and appraisal of the ratios of the beneficial biological control organisms to the harmful plant-feeders can be made.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accurate estimates of the total insect population of an alfalfa field can be obtained by the use of newly developed equipment and sampling techniques. All species of insects—each in relation to the whole as well as one to another—and measurement of the separate life stages, and appraisal of the ratios of the beneficial biological control organisms to the harmful plant-feeders can be made.
Leaf analysis as a guide to nitrogen: Fertilization of the avocado
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent reports indicate that applications of too little or too much nitrogen to avocado trees result in reduced yields.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent reports indicate that applications of too little or too much nitrogen to avocado trees result in reduced yields.
Potato quality lowered in field tests with: High nitrogen fertilization
by Herman Timm, L. D. Doneen, Torrey Lyons, J. C. Bishop, V. H. Schweers, J. R. Stockton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deterioration in quality of potatoes may be caused by applications of large quantities of nitrogen fertilizer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deterioration in quality of potatoes may be caused by applications of large quantities of nitrogen fertilizer.
Virus transmitted disease of cotton found in fields in desert valleys
by R. C. Dickson, E. F. Laird
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaf-crumple, a virus disease of cotton—first observed about 1948 in the Coachella Valley—has been found in the Imperial, Borrego, Mexicali, and Yuma valleys and in the Gila Valley up to a point well east of the town of Roll, Arizona. However, neither the leaf-crumple virus nor its insect vector has been seen in the San Joaquin Valley.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaf-crumple, a virus disease of cotton—first observed about 1948 in the Coachella Valley—has been found in the Imperial, Borrego, Mexicali, and Yuma valleys and in the Gila Valley up to a point well east of the town of Roll, Arizona. However, neither the leaf-crumple virus nor its insect vector has been seen in the San Joaquin Valley.
Repeated applications of herbicides to live oak sprouts essential for complete kills
by O. A. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Live oak—Quercus wislizenii—sprouts that develop after burning or bulldozing make conversion of a site to grass a difficult task.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Live oak—Quercus wislizenii—sprouts that develop after burning or bulldozing make conversion of a site to grass a difficult task.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 14, No.1

One-man handling equipment in citrus orchard
January 1960
Volume 14, Number 1

Research articles

Some growers participate in cooperative canneries other growers prefer to sell to private canneries
by Sidney Hoos
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Participation in cooperative canning usually offers a grower the advantage of an assured outlet for his raw product, because cooperative canneries generally stand ready to receive his crop for processing, regardless of the market situation. Thus the grower's risk of not having an outlet for his product may be reduced or even eliminated.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Participation in cooperative canning usually offers a grower the advantage of an assured outlet for his raw product, because cooperative canneries generally stand ready to receive his crop for processing, regardless of the market situation. Thus the grower's risk of not having an outlet for his product may be reduced or even eliminated.
New method for handling citrus fruits from orchard to packing house uses simple equipment
by Roy J. Smith, Russell L. Perry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: One-man operation of equipment for loading and unloading bins, and for moving the equipment up and down the box roads, is the essential element in a new method of handling citrus fruits between the orchard and the packing house.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: One-man operation of equipment for loading and unloading bins, and for moving the equipment up and down the box roads, is the essential element in a new method of handling citrus fruits between the orchard and the packing house.
Water stress and leaf drop: Healthy appearing leaves dropped by small orange trees after applied soil moisture ended induced periods of water stress
by R. T. Wedding, L. C. Erickson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Extremely heavy leaf drop has affected young orange trees in some inland areas of southern California in recent years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Extremely heavy leaf drop has affected young orange trees in some inland areas of southern California in recent years.
Biological control of insect pests aided by strip-farming alfalfa in experimental program
by E. I. Schlinger, E. J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Biological control of the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculala (Buckton)—in California became a rapid success after three species of parasites were introduced in 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Biological control of the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculala (Buckton)—in California became a rapid success after three species of parasites were introduced in 1956.
Vacuum cleaner principle applied in sampling insect populations in alfalfa fields by new machine method
by E. J. Dietrick, E. I. Schlinger, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accurate estimates of the total insect population of an alfalfa field can be obtained by the use of newly developed equipment and sampling techniques. All species of insects—each in relation to the whole as well as one to another—and measurement of the separate life stages, and appraisal of the ratios of the beneficial biological control organisms to the harmful plant-feeders can be made.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Accurate estimates of the total insect population of an alfalfa field can be obtained by the use of newly developed equipment and sampling techniques. All species of insects—each in relation to the whole as well as one to another—and measurement of the separate life stages, and appraisal of the ratios of the beneficial biological control organisms to the harmful plant-feeders can be made.
Leaf analysis as a guide to nitrogen: Fertilization of the avocado
by T. W. Embleton, W. W. Jones, M. J. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent reports indicate that applications of too little or too much nitrogen to avocado trees result in reduced yields.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent reports indicate that applications of too little or too much nitrogen to avocado trees result in reduced yields.
Potato quality lowered in field tests with: High nitrogen fertilization
by Herman Timm, L. D. Doneen, Torrey Lyons, J. C. Bishop, V. H. Schweers, J. R. Stockton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deterioration in quality of potatoes may be caused by applications of large quantities of nitrogen fertilizer.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deterioration in quality of potatoes may be caused by applications of large quantities of nitrogen fertilizer.
Virus transmitted disease of cotton found in fields in desert valleys
by R. C. Dickson, E. F. Laird
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaf-crumple, a virus disease of cotton—first observed about 1948 in the Coachella Valley—has been found in the Imperial, Borrego, Mexicali, and Yuma valleys and in the Gila Valley up to a point well east of the town of Roll, Arizona. However, neither the leaf-crumple virus nor its insect vector has been seen in the San Joaquin Valley.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Leaf-crumple, a virus disease of cotton—first observed about 1948 in the Coachella Valley—has been found in the Imperial, Borrego, Mexicali, and Yuma valleys and in the Gila Valley up to a point well east of the town of Roll, Arizona. However, neither the leaf-crumple virus nor its insect vector has been seen in the San Joaquin Valley.
Repeated applications of herbicides to live oak sprouts essential for complete kills
by O. A. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Live oak—Quercus wislizenii—sprouts that develop after burning or bulldozing make conversion of a site to grass a difficult task.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Live oak—Quercus wislizenii—sprouts that develop after burning or bulldozing make conversion of a site to grass a difficult task.

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