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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.6

Insect and mite damage to field beans
June 1959
Volume 13, Number 6

Research articles

Processing limas for freezing: Unit costs drop rapidly as percentage of grade-out drops and as total volume and effective utilization of plant increase
by Robert H. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the sixth in a series of progress reports on efficiency in the processing and marketing of frozen fruits and vegetables. The studies are being conducted cooperatively with the Agricultural Experiment Stations in Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii and the Agricultural Marketing Service, United States Department of Agriculture.
The following article is the sixth in a series of progress reports on efficiency in the processing and marketing of frozen fruits and vegetables. The studies are being conducted cooperatively with the Agricultural Experiment Stations in Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii and the Agricultural Marketing Service, United States Department of Agriculture.
Traffic-induced compaction: Inexpensive and relatively easy to use new soil penetrometer enables measurement of variations in degree of compaction
by W. J. Flocker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.
Reduction of wildfire hazard: Removal of dead fuel reduced damage by wildfire in treated portion of experimental second growth ponderosa pine range
by H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wildfires in areas treated by prescribed burning are relatively easy to control and are much less damaging than fires in similar untreated areas.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wildfires in areas treated by prescribed burning are relatively easy to control and are much less damaging than fires in similar untreated areas.
Lygus bug control in alfalfa: Increasing tolerance to insecticides complicates control of lygus bugs in state's major alfalfa seed producing areas
by J. E. Swift, Oscar G. Bacon, Vernon E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Apparently lygus bugs in certain alfalfa seed producing localities have developed a tolerance to toxaphene in addition to a tolerance to DDT.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Apparently lygus bugs in certain alfalfa seed producing localities have developed a tolerance to toxaphene in addition to a tolerance to DDT.
Pests of field beans: Insect and mite damage to pink, red beans investigated in Sutter Basin area
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, John H. Lindt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing fosses from certain insect pests and mites incurred by pink and red bean growers in the Sutler Basin area of northern California–reportedly in excess of $100,000 in sales returns alone during the 1956 season–resulted in studies of the problem during the 1957 and 1958 season?.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing fosses from certain insect pests and mites incurred by pink and red bean growers in the Sutler Basin area of northern California–reportedly in excess of $100,000 in sales returns alone during the 1956 season–resulted in studies of the problem during the 1957 and 1958 season?.
Soil potassium for potatoes: Depletion of soil potassium by cropping necessitates potash fertilization in certain areas of Kern and Tulare counties
by K. B. Tyler, O. A. Lorenz, P. M. Nelson, J. C. Bishop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fertilizer experiments–and a nutrient survey during the 1958 spring season–showed that some fields in Kern and Tulare counties are being depleted of exchangeable soil potassium to the point of deficiency, through frequent cropping to potatoes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fertilizer experiments–and a nutrient survey during the 1958 spring season–showed that some fields in Kern and Tulare counties are being depleted of exchangeable soil potassium to the point of deficiency, through frequent cropping to potatoes.
California red scale parasites: Colonization and recovery of three species introduced from the Orient in 1956–1957 indicate establishment in California
by Paul DeBach, John Landi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least five, probably more, different species of a tiny parasitic wasp–Aphytis –are efficient parasites of the California red scale in various portions of the area extending from southern Japan to West Pakistan.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least five, probably more, different species of a tiny parasitic wasp–Aphytis –are efficient parasites of the California red scale in various portions of the area extending from southern Japan to West Pakistan.
Control of tomato leaf miners: Comparative field tests indicate Dylox and Diazinon may be suitable as replacements for parathion in control programs
by A. E. Michelbacher, John Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Serious infestations of the tomato leaf miner in 1958 failed to develop because in most fields natural enemies–mostly parasites–were present in sufficient numbers to suppress the miner population to a level well below one of economic importance.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Serious infestations of the tomato leaf miner in 1958 failed to develop because in most fields natural enemies–mostly parasites–were present in sufficient numbers to suppress the miner population to a level well below one of economic importance.
Quality of brussels sprouts: Low temperatures during handling operations retarded quality deterioration in study of temperature effects on respiration
by James M. Lyons, Lawrence Rappaport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 75% of the Brussels sprouts grown for fresh market in the United States are produced in California, where the crop has a farm value of about $4 million annually.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 75% of the Brussels sprouts grown for fresh market in the United States are produced in California, where the crop has a farm value of about $4 million annually.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 13, No.6

Insect and mite damage to field beans
June 1959
Volume 13, Number 6

Research articles

Processing limas for freezing: Unit costs drop rapidly as percentage of grade-out drops and as total volume and effective utilization of plant increase
by Robert H. Reed
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the sixth in a series of progress reports on efficiency in the processing and marketing of frozen fruits and vegetables. The studies are being conducted cooperatively with the Agricultural Experiment Stations in Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii and the Agricultural Marketing Service, United States Department of Agriculture.
The following article is the sixth in a series of progress reports on efficiency in the processing and marketing of frozen fruits and vegetables. The studies are being conducted cooperatively with the Agricultural Experiment Stations in Washington, Oregon, and Hawaii and the Agricultural Marketing Service, United States Department of Agriculture.
Traffic-induced compaction: Inexpensive and relatively easy to use new soil penetrometer enables measurement of variations in degree of compaction
by W. J. Flocker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.
Reduction of wildfire hazard: Removal of dead fuel reduced damage by wildfire in treated portion of experimental second growth ponderosa pine range
by H. H. Biswell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wildfires in areas treated by prescribed burning are relatively easy to control and are much less damaging than fires in similar untreated areas.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wildfires in areas treated by prescribed burning are relatively easy to control and are much less damaging than fires in similar untreated areas.
Lygus bug control in alfalfa: Increasing tolerance to insecticides complicates control of lygus bugs in state's major alfalfa seed producing areas
by J. E. Swift, Oscar G. Bacon, Vernon E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Apparently lygus bugs in certain alfalfa seed producing localities have developed a tolerance to toxaphene in addition to a tolerance to DDT.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Apparently lygus bugs in certain alfalfa seed producing localities have developed a tolerance to toxaphene in addition to a tolerance to DDT.
Pests of field beans: Insect and mite damage to pink, red beans investigated in Sutter Basin area
by Woodrow W. Middlekauff, John H. Lindt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing fosses from certain insect pests and mites incurred by pink and red bean growers in the Sutler Basin area of northern California–reportedly in excess of $100,000 in sales returns alone during the 1956 season–resulted in studies of the problem during the 1957 and 1958 season?.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing fosses from certain insect pests and mites incurred by pink and red bean growers in the Sutler Basin area of northern California–reportedly in excess of $100,000 in sales returns alone during the 1956 season–resulted in studies of the problem during the 1957 and 1958 season?.
Soil potassium for potatoes: Depletion of soil potassium by cropping necessitates potash fertilization in certain areas of Kern and Tulare counties
by K. B. Tyler, O. A. Lorenz, P. M. Nelson, J. C. Bishop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fertilizer experiments–and a nutrient survey during the 1958 spring season–showed that some fields in Kern and Tulare counties are being depleted of exchangeable soil potassium to the point of deficiency, through frequent cropping to potatoes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fertilizer experiments–and a nutrient survey during the 1958 spring season–showed that some fields in Kern and Tulare counties are being depleted of exchangeable soil potassium to the point of deficiency, through frequent cropping to potatoes.
California red scale parasites: Colonization and recovery of three species introduced from the Orient in 1956–1957 indicate establishment in California
by Paul DeBach, John Landi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least five, probably more, different species of a tiny parasitic wasp–Aphytis –are efficient parasites of the California red scale in various portions of the area extending from southern Japan to West Pakistan.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: At least five, probably more, different species of a tiny parasitic wasp–Aphytis –are efficient parasites of the California red scale in various portions of the area extending from southern Japan to West Pakistan.
Control of tomato leaf miners: Comparative field tests indicate Dylox and Diazinon may be suitable as replacements for parathion in control programs
by A. E. Michelbacher, John Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Serious infestations of the tomato leaf miner in 1958 failed to develop because in most fields natural enemies–mostly parasites–were present in sufficient numbers to suppress the miner population to a level well below one of economic importance.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Serious infestations of the tomato leaf miner in 1958 failed to develop because in most fields natural enemies–mostly parasites–were present in sufficient numbers to suppress the miner population to a level well below one of economic importance.
Quality of brussels sprouts: Low temperatures during handling operations retarded quality deterioration in study of temperature effects on respiration
by James M. Lyons, Lawrence Rappaport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 75% of the Brussels sprouts grown for fresh market in the United States are produced in California, where the crop has a farm value of about $4 million annually.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: About 75% of the Brussels sprouts grown for fresh market in the United States are produced in California, where the crop has a farm value of about $4 million annually.

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