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Traffic-induced compaction: Inexpensive and relatively easy to use new soil penetrometer enables measurement of variations in degree of compaction

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Authors

W. J. Flocker, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(6):4-4.

Published June 01, 1959

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Abstract

Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.

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Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1673-G.

Traffic-induced compaction: Inexpensive and relatively easy to use new soil penetrometer enables measurement of variations in degree of compaction

W. J. Flocker
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Traffic-induced compaction: Inexpensive and relatively easy to use new soil penetrometer enables measurement of variations in degree of compaction

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. J. Flocker, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 13(6):4-4.

Published June 01, 1959

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Cultural methods used in modern commercial vegetable production involve operations–many passes over the field of tillage and harvesting machinery– that are conducive to soil compaction. The harvesting operations of some crops –especially celery, lettuce and spinach –are often carried out when soil moisture content is at a level at which severe compaction can occur.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The above progress report is based on Research Project No. 1673-G.


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