California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.7

Proper practices control pest of artichoke
July 1957
Volume 11, Number 7

Research articles

Tree fruit cuttings propagated: Vegetative propagation of softwood cuttings of certain tree fruit rootstocks achieved by chemical and mist treatments
by H. T. Hartmann, C. J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree fruits are usually propagated by budding or grafting on seedling root-stocks but such seedlings tend to show more or less variability in many characteristics, including resistance to nematodes and diseases.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree fruits are usually propagated by budding or grafting on seedling root-stocks but such seedlings tend to show more or less variability in many characteristics, including resistance to nematodes and diseases.
Weeds in drained rice fields: Early application of herbicides by air and by ground rig controlled weeds in drained rice fields in tests in 1956
by Karl H. Ingebretsen, Ronald S. Baskett, W. A. Harvey, Milton D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spraying drained rice fields for weed control is a recent development although the spraying of flooded rice by airplane is an established and steadily increasing practice.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spraying drained rice fields for weed control is a recent development although the spraying of flooded rice by airplane is an established and steadily increasing practice.
Milled rice yields: Tests show yield and quality affected by drying-air temperature and humidity
by S. M. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory rice drying studies conducted during the fall of 1956 investigated the effect of drying-air temperature and relative humidity on the quality of the milled rice. At the same time, a study was made of the possibility of drying with a one-pass column-drier using high relative humidities.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory rice drying studies conducted during the fall of 1956 investigated the effect of drying-air temperature and relative humidity on the quality of the milled rice. At the same time, a study was made of the possibility of drying with a one-pass column-drier using high relative humidities.
Fertilizer placement for rice: Ammonium-form nitrogen drilled into seedbed before flooding increased rice yields 25% to 50% in placement experiments
by D. S. Mikkelsen, D. C. Finfrock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ammonium-form fertilizers have special significance in the production of the California rice crop because ammonium nitrogen is the only inorganic form that can be maintained in continuously flooded soils. However, the maintenance of ammonium nitrogen is dependent upon proper fertilizer placement. When ammonium nitrogen is placed at a depth of 2″-4″ in a rice seedbed prior to flooding, its maximum utilization for increased rice yields is realized. Nitrogen which is converted to nitrate nitrogen before or after flooding will be denitrified and lost from the soil as nitrogen gas.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ammonium-form fertilizers have special significance in the production of the California rice crop because ammonium nitrogen is the only inorganic form that can be maintained in continuously flooded soils. However, the maintenance of ammonium nitrogen is dependent upon proper fertilizer placement. When ammonium nitrogen is placed at a depth of 2″-4″ in a rice seedbed prior to flooding, its maximum utilization for increased rice yields is realized. Nitrogen which is converted to nitrate nitrogen before or after flooding will be denitrified and lost from the soil as nitrogen gas.
Artichoke plume moth control: Experiments and field practices during 1949–1957 show value of properly timed parathion treatments and good sanitation
by W. H. Lange, R. H. Sciaroni, R. M. Drake, A. S. Greathead, J. E. Dibble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The artichoke plume moth—Platyptilia carduidactyla (Riley)—caused crop losses as high as 90% during 1956 and is the most important restricting factor in the production of artichokes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The artichoke plume moth—Platyptilia carduidactyla (Riley)—caused crop losses as high as 90% during 1956 and is the most important restricting factor in the production of artichokes.
Artichoke production: Costs and returns to growers studied in survey conducted at Half Moon Bay
by Philip S. Parsons, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Producing artichokes in the Half Moon Bay area during the 1956-57 season cost $513.36 per acre—$2.20 per 22-pound box—according to information obtained in a recent survey.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Producing artichokes in the Half Moon Bay area during the 1956-57 season cost $513.36 per acre—$2.20 per 22-pound box—according to information obtained in a recent survey.
Imported parasites established: Natural enemies of the spotted alfalfa aphid brought from the Middle East in 1955–56 now established in California
by Robert van den Bosch, E. I. Schlinger, E. J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three imported wasp species—parasites of the spotted alfalfa aphid—have survived their first winter in southern California alfalfa fields and have become abundant in several localities.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three imported wasp species—parasites of the spotted alfalfa aphid—have survived their first winter in southern California alfalfa fields and have become abundant in several localities.
Navel orangeworm: Summer infestations of codling moth on walnuts favorable to navel orangeworm
by A. E. Michelbacher, Norman Ross
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Summer walnuts infested with the codling moth furnish breeding locations for the navel orangeworm and—as a result—a population of moths is present in the orchard when the husks begin to crack as the harvest period approaches. The caterpillars of the navel orangeworm are unable to penetrate the green husks of sound walnuts so they are not subject to infestation until maturity is reached and the husks split. After this stage of nut development is reached, the crop is open to attack until it is harvested. As a result the amount of infestation tends to increase as harvest is delayed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Summer walnuts infested with the codling moth furnish breeding locations for the navel orangeworm and—as a result—a population of moths is present in the orchard when the husks begin to crack as the harvest period approaches. The caterpillars of the navel orangeworm are unable to penetrate the green husks of sound walnuts so they are not subject to infestation until maturity is reached and the husks split. After this stage of nut development is reached, the crop is open to attack until it is harvested. As a result the amount of infestation tends to increase as harvest is delayed.
Effect of oil spray on lemons: Juice quality and yield were not affected by pest control sprays in tests made in two southern California orchards
by L. A. Riehl, L. R. Jeppson, R. T. Wedding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: To determine the effects—if any—on the juice quality and fruit yield of pest control oil spray applied to lemon trees in any of the months from August through January, experimental blocks were established in two widely separated orchards.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: To determine the effects—if any—on the juice quality and fruit yield of pest control oil spray applied to lemon trees in any of the months from August through January, experimental blocks were established in two widely separated orchards.
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=11_7

California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.7

Proper practices control pest of artichoke
July 1957
Volume 11, Number 7

Research articles

Tree fruit cuttings propagated: Vegetative propagation of softwood cuttings of certain tree fruit rootstocks achieved by chemical and mist treatments
by H. T. Hartmann, C. J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree fruits are usually propagated by budding or grafting on seedling root-stocks but such seedlings tend to show more or less variability in many characteristics, including resistance to nematodes and diseases.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree fruits are usually propagated by budding or grafting on seedling root-stocks but such seedlings tend to show more or less variability in many characteristics, including resistance to nematodes and diseases.
Weeds in drained rice fields: Early application of herbicides by air and by ground rig controlled weeds in drained rice fields in tests in 1956
by Karl H. Ingebretsen, Ronald S. Baskett, W. A. Harvey, Milton D. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spraying drained rice fields for weed control is a recent development although the spraying of flooded rice by airplane is an established and steadily increasing practice.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spraying drained rice fields for weed control is a recent development although the spraying of flooded rice by airplane is an established and steadily increasing practice.
Milled rice yields: Tests show yield and quality affected by drying-air temperature and humidity
by S. M. Henderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory rice drying studies conducted during the fall of 1956 investigated the effect of drying-air temperature and relative humidity on the quality of the milled rice. At the same time, a study was made of the possibility of drying with a one-pass column-drier using high relative humidities.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Laboratory rice drying studies conducted during the fall of 1956 investigated the effect of drying-air temperature and relative humidity on the quality of the milled rice. At the same time, a study was made of the possibility of drying with a one-pass column-drier using high relative humidities.
Fertilizer placement for rice: Ammonium-form nitrogen drilled into seedbed before flooding increased rice yields 25% to 50% in placement experiments
by D. S. Mikkelsen, D. C. Finfrock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ammonium-form fertilizers have special significance in the production of the California rice crop because ammonium nitrogen is the only inorganic form that can be maintained in continuously flooded soils. However, the maintenance of ammonium nitrogen is dependent upon proper fertilizer placement. When ammonium nitrogen is placed at a depth of 2″-4″ in a rice seedbed prior to flooding, its maximum utilization for increased rice yields is realized. Nitrogen which is converted to nitrate nitrogen before or after flooding will be denitrified and lost from the soil as nitrogen gas.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Ammonium-form fertilizers have special significance in the production of the California rice crop because ammonium nitrogen is the only inorganic form that can be maintained in continuously flooded soils. However, the maintenance of ammonium nitrogen is dependent upon proper fertilizer placement. When ammonium nitrogen is placed at a depth of 2″-4″ in a rice seedbed prior to flooding, its maximum utilization for increased rice yields is realized. Nitrogen which is converted to nitrate nitrogen before or after flooding will be denitrified and lost from the soil as nitrogen gas.
Artichoke plume moth control: Experiments and field practices during 1949–1957 show value of properly timed parathion treatments and good sanitation
by W. H. Lange, R. H. Sciaroni, R. M. Drake, A. S. Greathead, J. E. Dibble
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The artichoke plume moth—Platyptilia carduidactyla (Riley)—caused crop losses as high as 90% during 1956 and is the most important restricting factor in the production of artichokes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The artichoke plume moth—Platyptilia carduidactyla (Riley)—caused crop losses as high as 90% during 1956 and is the most important restricting factor in the production of artichokes.
Artichoke production: Costs and returns to growers studied in survey conducted at Half Moon Bay
by Philip S. Parsons, R. H. Sciaroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Producing artichokes in the Half Moon Bay area during the 1956-57 season cost $513.36 per acre—$2.20 per 22-pound box—according to information obtained in a recent survey.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Producing artichokes in the Half Moon Bay area during the 1956-57 season cost $513.36 per acre—$2.20 per 22-pound box—according to information obtained in a recent survey.
Imported parasites established: Natural enemies of the spotted alfalfa aphid brought from the Middle East in 1955–56 now established in California
by Robert van den Bosch, E. I. Schlinger, E. J. Dietrick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three imported wasp species—parasites of the spotted alfalfa aphid—have survived their first winter in southern California alfalfa fields and have become abundant in several localities.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three imported wasp species—parasites of the spotted alfalfa aphid—have survived their first winter in southern California alfalfa fields and have become abundant in several localities.
Navel orangeworm: Summer infestations of codling moth on walnuts favorable to navel orangeworm
by A. E. Michelbacher, Norman Ross
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Summer walnuts infested with the codling moth furnish breeding locations for the navel orangeworm and—as a result—a population of moths is present in the orchard when the husks begin to crack as the harvest period approaches. The caterpillars of the navel orangeworm are unable to penetrate the green husks of sound walnuts so they are not subject to infestation until maturity is reached and the husks split. After this stage of nut development is reached, the crop is open to attack until it is harvested. As a result the amount of infestation tends to increase as harvest is delayed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Summer walnuts infested with the codling moth furnish breeding locations for the navel orangeworm and—as a result—a population of moths is present in the orchard when the husks begin to crack as the harvest period approaches. The caterpillars of the navel orangeworm are unable to penetrate the green husks of sound walnuts so they are not subject to infestation until maturity is reached and the husks split. After this stage of nut development is reached, the crop is open to attack until it is harvested. As a result the amount of infestation tends to increase as harvest is delayed.
Effect of oil spray on lemons: Juice quality and yield were not affected by pest control sprays in tests made in two southern California orchards
by L. A. Riehl, L. R. Jeppson, R. T. Wedding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: To determine the effects—if any—on the juice quality and fruit yield of pest control oil spray applied to lemon trees in any of the months from August through January, experimental blocks were established in two widely separated orchards.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: To determine the effects—if any—on the juice quality and fruit yield of pest control oil spray applied to lemon trees in any of the months from August through January, experimental blocks were established in two widely separated orchards.

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/