California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.8

Frost protection dependent on air inversion
August 1957
Volume 11, Number 8

Research articles

Ungrafted vineyard rootstock: Eradication of unproductive rootstock vines by treatment with chemicals tested in Sonoma and Santa Clara counties
by L. A. Lider, O. A. Leonard, R. L. Sisson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Approximately 30% of the 450,000 acres of vineyards in California are—necessarily—on rootstock resistant to certain soil pests.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Approximately 30% of the 450,000 acres of vineyards in California are—necessarily—on rootstock resistant to certain soil pests.
Improved oat variety: Resistant to drought, shattering and stem rust, the new Indio shows promise
by Coit A. Suneson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Indio—the first oat variety developed for California by using the backcrossing techniques of plant breeding—has definite advantages over other varieties, and further improvements are under way.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Indio—the first oat variety developed for California by using the backcrossing techniques of plant breeding—has definite advantages over other varieties, and further improvements are under way.
Lygus bug injury to carrot seed: Pest can cause 50% or more loss of carrot seed crop unless controlled by three properly timed 10% DDT dust applications
by Elmer C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage and control experiments in the Sacramento Valley investigated the relationship of the lygus bug—Lygus hesperus Knight—to Red Core Chantenay carrot seed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage and control experiments in the Sacramento Valley investigated the relationship of the lygus bug—Lygus hesperus Knight—to Red Core Chantenay carrot seed.
Effectiveness of wind machines: Frost protection by ramjet or conventional wind machines in deciduous orchards depends on the strength of the inversion
by G. E. Goodall, D. E. Angus, A. S. Leonard, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: When the atmosphere 40′ to 50′ above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: When the atmosphere 40′ to 50′ above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.
Worm infestation of tomatoes: Western yellow-striped armyworm on tomatoes controlled in second year of trials conducted in San Joaquin County fields
by John P. Underhill, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A caterpillar control program in nine commercial tomato fields—in San Joaquin County in 1956—repeated the successful trials in 1955 because of reports of suspected resistance of the corn ear-worm to DDD and DDT.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A caterpillar control program in nine commercial tomato fields—in San Joaquin County in 1956—repeated the successful trials in 1955 because of reports of suspected resistance of the corn ear-worm to DDD and DDT.
Harvester for canning fruit: Exploratory trials with cling peaches and Bartlett pears to evaluate feasibility of shaking fruit onto catching frame
by Lloyd H. Lamouria, Richard W. Harris, George H. Abernathy, Sherman J. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree structure is the greatest deterrent to the successful mechanical harvest of fruit destined for the cannery.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree structure is the greatest deterrent to the successful mechanical harvest of fruit destined for the cannery.
Defoliation of hydrangea: Chemical defoliation of hydrangea plants obtained rapidly and without injury to flower buds by prestorage treatment
by Anton M. Kofranek, Andrew T. Leiser
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flower buds of the common hydrangea—Hydrangea hortensis—are initiated during summer or early fall, but a cold period of 6-8 weeks is required to condition the buds for subsequent flowering.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flower buds of the common hydrangea—Hydrangea hortensis—are initiated during summer or early fall, but a cold period of 6-8 weeks is required to condition the buds for subsequent flowering.
Orange tortrix on avocados: Pest becoming of increasing economic importance on certain varieties of avocado in some orchards in the coastal areas
by Walter Ebeling, Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana (Fernald)—was discovered to be doing a limited amount of damage to avocados in 1949, although it was known to be in California—primarily on citrus—as early as 1885.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana (Fernald)—was discovered to be doing a limited amount of damage to avocados in 1949, although it was known to be in California—primarily on citrus—as early as 1885.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.8

Frost protection dependent on air inversion
August 1957
Volume 11, Number 8

Research articles

Ungrafted vineyard rootstock: Eradication of unproductive rootstock vines by treatment with chemicals tested in Sonoma and Santa Clara counties
by L. A. Lider, O. A. Leonard, R. L. Sisson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Approximately 30% of the 450,000 acres of vineyards in California are—necessarily—on rootstock resistant to certain soil pests.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Approximately 30% of the 450,000 acres of vineyards in California are—necessarily—on rootstock resistant to certain soil pests.
Improved oat variety: Resistant to drought, shattering and stem rust, the new Indio shows promise
by Coit A. Suneson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Indio—the first oat variety developed for California by using the backcrossing techniques of plant breeding—has definite advantages over other varieties, and further improvements are under way.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Indio—the first oat variety developed for California by using the backcrossing techniques of plant breeding—has definite advantages over other varieties, and further improvements are under way.
Lygus bug injury to carrot seed: Pest can cause 50% or more loss of carrot seed crop unless controlled by three properly timed 10% DDT dust applications
by Elmer C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage and control experiments in the Sacramento Valley investigated the relationship of the lygus bug—Lygus hesperus Knight—to Red Core Chantenay carrot seed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage and control experiments in the Sacramento Valley investigated the relationship of the lygus bug—Lygus hesperus Knight—to Red Core Chantenay carrot seed.
Effectiveness of wind machines: Frost protection by ramjet or conventional wind machines in deciduous orchards depends on the strength of the inversion
by G. E. Goodall, D. E. Angus, A. S. Leonard, F. A. Brooks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: When the atmosphere 40′ to 50′ above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: When the atmosphere 40′ to 50′ above ground is 13°F or more warmer than it is a few feet above the soil surface, the temperature inversion condition—in frost protection research—is considered to be strong. When the temperature difference is less than about 5°F the inversion is considered weak. The weak inversions usually found in the deciduous orchards on the floor of the Sacramento Valley appear to limit the usefulness of wind machines for frost protection unless additional heat is supplied from orchard heaters.
Worm infestation of tomatoes: Western yellow-striped armyworm on tomatoes controlled in second year of trials conducted in San Joaquin County fields
by John P. Underhill, A. E. Michelbacher
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A caterpillar control program in nine commercial tomato fields—in San Joaquin County in 1956—repeated the successful trials in 1955 because of reports of suspected resistance of the corn ear-worm to DDD and DDT.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A caterpillar control program in nine commercial tomato fields—in San Joaquin County in 1956—repeated the successful trials in 1955 because of reports of suspected resistance of the corn ear-worm to DDD and DDT.
Harvester for canning fruit: Exploratory trials with cling peaches and Bartlett pears to evaluate feasibility of shaking fruit onto catching frame
by Lloyd H. Lamouria, Richard W. Harris, George H. Abernathy, Sherman J. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree structure is the greatest deterrent to the successful mechanical harvest of fruit destined for the cannery.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tree structure is the greatest deterrent to the successful mechanical harvest of fruit destined for the cannery.
Defoliation of hydrangea: Chemical defoliation of hydrangea plants obtained rapidly and without injury to flower buds by prestorage treatment
by Anton M. Kofranek, Andrew T. Leiser
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flower buds of the common hydrangea—Hydrangea hortensis—are initiated during summer or early fall, but a cold period of 6-8 weeks is required to condition the buds for subsequent flowering.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Flower buds of the common hydrangea—Hydrangea hortensis—are initiated during summer or early fall, but a cold period of 6-8 weeks is required to condition the buds for subsequent flowering.
Orange tortrix on avocados: Pest becoming of increasing economic importance on certain varieties of avocado in some orchards in the coastal areas
by Walter Ebeling, Roy J. Pence
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana (Fernald)—was discovered to be doing a limited amount of damage to avocados in 1949, although it was known to be in California—primarily on citrus—as early as 1885.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The orange tortrix—Argyrotaenia citrana (Fernald)—was discovered to be doing a limited amount of damage to avocados in 1949, although it was known to be in California—primarily on citrus—as early as 1885.

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