California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.6

Investigation on cantaloupe crown blight
June 1957
Volume 11, Number 6

Research articles

Mechanized grape grafting: Portable machine developed for bench or field grafting of grapes saves time and eliminates the need for skilled labor
by C. J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grape varieties established in areas having such pests as phylloxera or nematodes must be budded or grafted onto a suitable resistant rootstock.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grape varieties established in areas having such pests as phylloxera or nematodes must be budded or grafted onto a suitable resistant rootstock.
Grape leaf folder: Field tests compared effectiveness of insecticides in control of vineyard pest
by E. M. Stafford, F. L. Jensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sprays of standard lead arsenate for first brood grape leaf folder control and parathion dusts for second and third brood controls have generally given the best results in trials carried out during the last three years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sprays of standard lead arsenate for first brood grape leaf folder control and parathion dusts for second and third brood controls have generally given the best results in trials carried out during the last three years.
Crown blight of cantaloupe: Experimental plots established in Imperial Valley to refute or confirm observations made in earlier studies of disorder
by R. T. Wedding, J. B. Kendrick, J. T. Middleton, T. W. Whitaker, G. W. Bohn, R. A. Kortson, A. O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the second of two progress reports on cantaloupe crown blight studies.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the second of two progress reports on cantaloupe crown blight studies.
Frost protection by sprinklers: Use of overhead sprinklers for frost protection on low growing plants tested on blueberries in Santa Cruz County
by H. B. Schultz, R. R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heat released by ice forming from water sprinkled on plants—that can carry the ice load—appears to be an efficient means of frost protection.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heat released by ice forming from water sprinkled on plants—that can carry the ice load—appears to be an efficient means of frost protection.
Russet on Bartlett pears: Neither sprays nor dusts applied during the cluster-bud and bloom period increased russeting in tests during 1956 season
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Russet of Bartlett pears was not increased by the cluster-bud spray or bloom period dusts applied in test orchards during the spring of 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Russet of Bartlett pears was not increased by the cluster-bud spray or bloom period dusts applied in test orchards during the spring of 1956.
Scaly bark disease of citrus: Nine-year study of seven older orange orchards indicates advance of psorosis may be faster than is generally believed
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is a progressive disease which may take several years to render a tree unprofitable or completely nonproductive. Nevertheless, it can take a bearing tree out of production faster than replants can be brought into production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is a progressive disease which may take several years to render a tree unprofitable or completely nonproductive. Nevertheless, it can take a bearing tree out of production faster than replants can be brought into production.
Fumigants for citrus nematode: Several fumigants available for treatment of old citrus soil for control of nematode before replanting with young trees
by R. C. Baines, J. P. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The citrus nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—is known to be in the 14 counties of California where there are commercial plantings of citrus. The nematode is a parasitic pest that feeds on the roots of citrus trees. Its feeding decreases vigor and rate of tree growth and the yield and size of fruit. The nematode does not kill the trees but may reduce growth of young lemons and oranges by 40% to 60%.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The citrus nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—is known to be in the 14 counties of California where there are commercial plantings of citrus. The nematode is a parasitic pest that feeds on the roots of citrus trees. Its feeding decreases vigor and rate of tree growth and the yield and size of fruit. The nematode does not kill the trees but may reduce growth of young lemons and oranges by 40% to 60%.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.6

Investigation on cantaloupe crown blight
June 1957
Volume 11, Number 6

Research articles

Mechanized grape grafting: Portable machine developed for bench or field grafting of grapes saves time and eliminates the need for skilled labor
by C. J. Alley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grape varieties established in areas having such pests as phylloxera or nematodes must be budded or grafted onto a suitable resistant rootstock.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grape varieties established in areas having such pests as phylloxera or nematodes must be budded or grafted onto a suitable resistant rootstock.
Grape leaf folder: Field tests compared effectiveness of insecticides in control of vineyard pest
by E. M. Stafford, F. L. Jensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sprays of standard lead arsenate for first brood grape leaf folder control and parathion dusts for second and third brood controls have generally given the best results in trials carried out during the last three years.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Sprays of standard lead arsenate for first brood grape leaf folder control and parathion dusts for second and third brood controls have generally given the best results in trials carried out during the last three years.
Crown blight of cantaloupe: Experimental plots established in Imperial Valley to refute or confirm observations made in earlier studies of disorder
by R. T. Wedding, J. B. Kendrick, J. T. Middleton, T. W. Whitaker, G. W. Bohn, R. A. Kortson, A. O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the second of two progress reports on cantaloupe crown blight studies.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following article is the second of two progress reports on cantaloupe crown blight studies.
Frost protection by sprinklers: Use of overhead sprinklers for frost protection on low growing plants tested on blueberries in Santa Cruz County
by H. B. Schultz, R. R. Parks
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heat released by ice forming from water sprinkled on plants—that can carry the ice load—appears to be an efficient means of frost protection.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Heat released by ice forming from water sprinkled on plants—that can carry the ice load—appears to be an efficient means of frost protection.
Russet on Bartlett pears: Neither sprays nor dusts applied during the cluster-bud and bloom period increased russeting in tests during 1956 season
by Richard W. Harris, William H. Griggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Russet of Bartlett pears was not increased by the cluster-bud spray or bloom period dusts applied in test orchards during the spring of 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Russet of Bartlett pears was not increased by the cluster-bud spray or bloom period dusts applied in test orchards during the spring of 1956.
Scaly bark disease of citrus: Nine-year study of seven older orange orchards indicates advance of psorosis may be faster than is generally believed
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is a progressive disease which may take several years to render a tree unprofitable or completely nonproductive. Nevertheless, it can take a bearing tree out of production faster than replants can be brought into production.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is a progressive disease which may take several years to render a tree unprofitable or completely nonproductive. Nevertheless, it can take a bearing tree out of production faster than replants can be brought into production.
Fumigants for citrus nematode: Several fumigants available for treatment of old citrus soil for control of nematode before replanting with young trees
by R. C. Baines, J. P. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The citrus nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—is known to be in the 14 counties of California where there are commercial plantings of citrus. The nematode is a parasitic pest that feeds on the roots of citrus trees. Its feeding decreases vigor and rate of tree growth and the yield and size of fruit. The nematode does not kill the trees but may reduce growth of young lemons and oranges by 40% to 60%.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The citrus nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—is known to be in the 14 counties of California where there are commercial plantings of citrus. The nematode is a parasitic pest that feeds on the roots of citrus trees. Its feeding decreases vigor and rate of tree growth and the yield and size of fruit. The nematode does not kill the trees but may reduce growth of young lemons and oranges by 40% to 60%.

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