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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.3

Leaf miner attacks of cyclic nature
March 1957
Volume 11, Number 3

Research articles

Serpentine leaf miner damage: Spinach losses in 1956 recall cyclic attacks by pests and need of both insecticides and natural enemies for control
by W. H. Lange, A. A. Grigarick, E. C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.
New carnation pests: Bud mite and leaf miner found in California may cause serious problems
by A. Earl Pritchard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Carnation growers in California—constantly combating spider mites, thrips and aphids, and occasional infestations of carnation bud moth or mealy-bugs—have two new pests to fight.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Carnation growers in California—constantly combating spider mites, thrips and aphids, and occasional infestations of carnation bud moth or mealy-bugs—have two new pests to fight.
New materials for codling moth: New compounds evaluated for control of codling moth should resistance to DDT be developed by the pest in California
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An increasing number of reports of codling moth resistance to DDT—although none of the cases occurred in California—prompted the testing of several new materials for codling moth control during the 1956 season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An increasing number of reports of codling moth resistance to DDT—although none of the cases occurred in California—prompted the testing of several new materials for codling moth control during the 1956 season.
Soft scales on walnut in 1956: Increase in soft scale populations on walnuts in northern California effected by several factors in complex problem
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen W. Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Destructive populations of soft scales—frosted scale, Lecanium pruinosum, Coq.; European fruit lecanium, L. corni Bouché: and the calico scale, L. cera-sorum Ckll.—occurred on walnuts in many locations in northern California during 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Destructive populations of soft scales—frosted scale, Lecanium pruinosum, Coq.; European fruit lecanium, L. corni Bouché: and the calico scale, L. cera-sorum Ckll.—occurred on walnuts in many locations in northern California during 1956.
Smog reduces seedling growth: Zutano avocado seedling growth affected by synthetic smog of ozone and hexene vapor in fumigation chamber experiment
by O. C. Taylor, E. A. Cardiff, J. D. Mersereau, J. T. Middleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Growth of Zutano avocado seedlings was reduced when the plants were exposed to synthetic smog—a mixture of ozone and hexene vapor—in an experiment designed to study the effect of the toxicants on seedling growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Growth of Zutano avocado seedlings was reduced when the plants were exposed to synthetic smog—a mixture of ozone and hexene vapor—in an experiment designed to study the effect of the toxicants on seedling growth.
Tree nutrient sprays: Results of foliar sprays to supplement deficiencies affected by fruit variety
by E. L. Proebsting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies of many of the minor nutrient elements in most species of fruit trees can be corrected by sprays.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies of many of the minor nutrient elements in most species of fruit trees can be corrected by sprays.
Soil profiles identify series: Basic soil surveys establish classifying characteristics and indicate selection of most efficient agricultural use
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Differences in the surface 6′ of soil—in structure, color, texture, reaction, content of salts or humus, mineralogical composition—usually have agricultural significance and separate soils into different series or identifying units of classification. Nearly 500 soil series have been identified in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Differences in the surface 6′ of soil—in structure, color, texture, reaction, content of salts or humus, mineralogical composition—usually have agricultural significance and separate soils into different series or identifying units of classification. Nearly 500 soil series have been identified in California.
Soil sterilized by irradiation: Sterilization of soil by exposure to an electron beam offers new tool for research on chemistry and microbiology of soil
by A. D. McLaren, Lola Reshetko
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil may be sterilized easily by an electron beam—of sufficient intensity and energy—without destroying the urease-enzyme activity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil may be sterilized easily by an electron beam—of sufficient intensity and energy—without destroying the urease-enzyme activity.
New Satsuma mandarin strains: Fruit of nucellar lines of mandarin-orange color earlier and have higher per cent of soluble solids than the parent line
by James W. Cameron, Robert K. Soost, Howard B. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Long-time studies of Satsuma mandarin nucellar-seedling lines—derived mainly from a single seed-parent tree—indicate that both genetic change and nucellar embryony may be responsible for earlier fruit coloring, especially in heavy-crop years, and for a consistently higher per cent of soluble solids than in the old parent line.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Long-time studies of Satsuma mandarin nucellar-seedling lines—derived mainly from a single seed-parent tree—indicate that both genetic change and nucellar embryony may be responsible for earlier fruit coloring, especially in heavy-crop years, and for a consistently higher per cent of soluble solids than in the old parent line.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.3

Leaf miner attacks of cyclic nature
March 1957
Volume 11, Number 3

Research articles

Serpentine leaf miner damage: Spinach losses in 1956 recall cyclic attacks by pests and need of both insecticides and natural enemies for control
by W. H. Lange, A. A. Grigarick, E. C. Carlson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.
New carnation pests: Bud mite and leaf miner found in California may cause serious problems
by A. Earl Pritchard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Carnation growers in California—constantly combating spider mites, thrips and aphids, and occasional infestations of carnation bud moth or mealy-bugs—have two new pests to fight.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Carnation growers in California—constantly combating spider mites, thrips and aphids, and occasional infestations of carnation bud moth or mealy-bugs—have two new pests to fight.
New materials for codling moth: New compounds evaluated for control of codling moth should resistance to DDT be developed by the pest in California
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An increasing number of reports of codling moth resistance to DDT—although none of the cases occurred in California—prompted the testing of several new materials for codling moth control during the 1956 season.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: An increasing number of reports of codling moth resistance to DDT—although none of the cases occurred in California—prompted the testing of several new materials for codling moth control during the 1956 season.
Soft scales on walnut in 1956: Increase in soft scale populations on walnuts in northern California effected by several factors in complex problem
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen W. Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Destructive populations of soft scales—frosted scale, Lecanium pruinosum, Coq.; European fruit lecanium, L. corni Bouché: and the calico scale, L. cera-sorum Ckll.—occurred on walnuts in many locations in northern California during 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Destructive populations of soft scales—frosted scale, Lecanium pruinosum, Coq.; European fruit lecanium, L. corni Bouché: and the calico scale, L. cera-sorum Ckll.—occurred on walnuts in many locations in northern California during 1956.
Smog reduces seedling growth: Zutano avocado seedling growth affected by synthetic smog of ozone and hexene vapor in fumigation chamber experiment
by O. C. Taylor, E. A. Cardiff, J. D. Mersereau, J. T. Middleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Growth of Zutano avocado seedlings was reduced when the plants were exposed to synthetic smog—a mixture of ozone and hexene vapor—in an experiment designed to study the effect of the toxicants on seedling growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Growth of Zutano avocado seedlings was reduced when the plants were exposed to synthetic smog—a mixture of ozone and hexene vapor—in an experiment designed to study the effect of the toxicants on seedling growth.
Tree nutrient sprays: Results of foliar sprays to supplement deficiencies affected by fruit variety
by E. L. Proebsting
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies of many of the minor nutrient elements in most species of fruit trees can be corrected by sprays.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies of many of the minor nutrient elements in most species of fruit trees can be corrected by sprays.
Soil profiles identify series: Basic soil surveys establish classifying characteristics and indicate selection of most efficient agricultural use
by Lloyd N. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Differences in the surface 6′ of soil—in structure, color, texture, reaction, content of salts or humus, mineralogical composition—usually have agricultural significance and separate soils into different series or identifying units of classification. Nearly 500 soil series have been identified in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Differences in the surface 6′ of soil—in structure, color, texture, reaction, content of salts or humus, mineralogical composition—usually have agricultural significance and separate soils into different series or identifying units of classification. Nearly 500 soil series have been identified in California.
Soil sterilized by irradiation: Sterilization of soil by exposure to an electron beam offers new tool for research on chemistry and microbiology of soil
by A. D. McLaren, Lola Reshetko
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil may be sterilized easily by an electron beam—of sufficient intensity and energy—without destroying the urease-enzyme activity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil may be sterilized easily by an electron beam—of sufficient intensity and energy—without destroying the urease-enzyme activity.
New Satsuma mandarin strains: Fruit of nucellar lines of mandarin-orange color earlier and have higher per cent of soluble solids than the parent line
by James W. Cameron, Robert K. Soost, Howard B. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Long-time studies of Satsuma mandarin nucellar-seedling lines—derived mainly from a single seed-parent tree—indicate that both genetic change and nucellar embryony may be responsible for earlier fruit coloring, especially in heavy-crop years, and for a consistently higher per cent of soluble solids than in the old parent line.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Long-time studies of Satsuma mandarin nucellar-seedling lines—derived mainly from a single seed-parent tree—indicate that both genetic change and nucellar embryony may be responsible for earlier fruit coloring, especially in heavy-crop years, and for a consistently higher per cent of soluble solids than in the old parent line.

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