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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.2

Biological control of spotted alfalfa aphid
February 1957
Volume 11, Number 2

Research articles

Peach tree borer control tests: Fall treatments with soil fumigants and use of trunk sprays evaluated in experimental program during the 1955–56 seasons
by Harold F. Madsen, Ross R. Sanborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond, peach and apricot growers in the Brentwood area suffered considerable damage from the peach tree borer in 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond, peach and apricot growers in the Brentwood area suffered considerable damage from the peach tree borer in 1955.
Aphid resistance to parathion: Nonphosphate insecticides under study for control of spotted alfalfa aphid where pest develops resstance to parathion
by Vernon M. Stern, Harold T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Failure of parathion and malathion to control the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California was reported in an increasing number during the summer of 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Failure of parathion and malathion to control the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California was reported in an increasing number during the summer of 1956.
Fungi on spotted alfalfa aphid: Spread of fungi by natural and artificial means is resulting in excellent biological control of aphid in many counties
by Irvin M. Hall, Paul H. Dunn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Five unidentified species of parasitic entomophthorous fungi are now known to be attacking the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Five unidentified species of parasitic entomophthorous fungi are now known to be attacking the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California.
Soil fumigation for nematodes: Nematocides tested for the control of root-knot nematodes affecting fresh market and canning tomato crops in California
by Bert Lear, Ivan J. Thomaason
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Widespread damage to tomatoes in California is caused by two root-knot nematode species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Widespread damage to tomatoes in California is caused by two root-knot nematode species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica.
Codling moth infestations up: Damage to harvested walnuts increased markedly in northern California during the 1956 season in comparison with 1955
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen W. Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Codling moth populations on walnuts vary from year to year but during the 1956 season—in all districts where investigations were conducted—there was a general rise in the seriousness of infestations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Codling moth populations on walnuts vary from year to year but during the 1956 season—in all districts where investigations were conducted—there was a general rise in the seriousness of infestations.
California scaly bark disease of citrus: No known cure for infected trees but treatment in early stages of disease can retard its advance into successive stages with their increasing economic loss
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer, William Yendol
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is the primary killer of citrus trees in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is the primary killer of citrus trees in California.
Bartlett pears for canning: Ripeness of fruit at time of processing affects color, flavor, aroma, and over-all quality of finished product
by Sherman Leonard, Bor Shiun Luh, Elly Hinreiner, Marion Simone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper ripeness of Bartlett pears at canning time is important to the quality of the product.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper ripeness of Bartlett pears at canning time is important to the quality of the product.
Citrus weed control by monuron: Experiments with urea herbicides for weed control in citrus orchards encouraging but use of the chemicals is restricted
by B. E. Day, R. C. Russell, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The urea herbicide, monuron—3-(p-chlorophenyl)-l, 1-dimethylurea—formerly known as CMU, was registered with a federal residue tolerence of 1 ppm—one part per million—for limited use in Valencia and navel orange orchards during the fall of 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The urea herbicide, monuron—3-(p-chlorophenyl)-l, 1-dimethylurea—formerly known as CMU, was registered with a federal residue tolerence of 1 ppm—one part per million—for limited use in Valencia and navel orange orchards during the fall of 1955.
Weed control near grass areas: Soil fumigants and contact spray materials included in series of studies on control of weeds in relatively confined areas
by M. H. Kimball, Boysie Day, Chester L. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Machine and chemical methods of weed control in relatively restricted areas—flower beds, ornamental trees and shrubs, small drainage channels, parking areas and patios—are not adaptable to most situations or are hazardous to adjacent plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Machine and chemical methods of weed control in relatively restricted areas—flower beds, ornamental trees and shrubs, small drainage channels, parking areas and patios—are not adaptable to most situations or are hazardous to adjacent plantings.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.2

Biological control of spotted alfalfa aphid
February 1957
Volume 11, Number 2

Research articles

Peach tree borer control tests: Fall treatments with soil fumigants and use of trunk sprays evaluated in experimental program during the 1955–56 seasons
by Harold F. Madsen, Ross R. Sanborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond, peach and apricot growers in the Brentwood area suffered considerable damage from the peach tree borer in 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Almond, peach and apricot growers in the Brentwood area suffered considerable damage from the peach tree borer in 1955.
Aphid resistance to parathion: Nonphosphate insecticides under study for control of spotted alfalfa aphid where pest develops resstance to parathion
by Vernon M. Stern, Harold T. Reynolds
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Failure of parathion and malathion to control the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California was reported in an increasing number during the summer of 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Failure of parathion and malathion to control the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California was reported in an increasing number during the summer of 1956.
Fungi on spotted alfalfa aphid: Spread of fungi by natural and artificial means is resulting in excellent biological control of aphid in many counties
by Irvin M. Hall, Paul H. Dunn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Five unidentified species of parasitic entomophthorous fungi are now known to be attacking the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Five unidentified species of parasitic entomophthorous fungi are now known to be attacking the spotted alfalfa aphid—Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)—in California.
Soil fumigation for nematodes: Nematocides tested for the control of root-knot nematodes affecting fresh market and canning tomato crops in California
by Bert Lear, Ivan J. Thomaason
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Widespread damage to tomatoes in California is caused by two root-knot nematode species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Widespread damage to tomatoes in California is caused by two root-knot nematode species—Meloidogyne incognita var. acrita and M. javanica.
Codling moth infestations up: Damage to harvested walnuts increased markedly in northern California during the 1956 season in comparison with 1955
by A. E. Michelbacher, Stephen W. Hitchcock
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Codling moth populations on walnuts vary from year to year but during the 1956 season—in all districts where investigations were conducted—there was a general rise in the seriousness of infestations.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Codling moth populations on walnuts vary from year to year but during the 1956 season—in all districts where investigations were conducted—there was a general rise in the seriousness of infestations.
California scaly bark disease of citrus: No known cure for infected trees but treatment in early stages of disease can retard its advance into successive stages with their increasing economic loss
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer, William Yendol
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is the primary killer of citrus trees in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Psorosis—scaly bark—is the primary killer of citrus trees in California.
Bartlett pears for canning: Ripeness of fruit at time of processing affects color, flavor, aroma, and over-all quality of finished product
by Sherman Leonard, Bor Shiun Luh, Elly Hinreiner, Marion Simone
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper ripeness of Bartlett pears at canning time is important to the quality of the product.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Proper ripeness of Bartlett pears at canning time is important to the quality of the product.
Citrus weed control by monuron: Experiments with urea herbicides for weed control in citrus orchards encouraging but use of the chemicals is restricted
by B. E. Day, R. C. Russell, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The urea herbicide, monuron—3-(p-chlorophenyl)-l, 1-dimethylurea—formerly known as CMU, was registered with a federal residue tolerence of 1 ppm—one part per million—for limited use in Valencia and navel orange orchards during the fall of 1955.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The urea herbicide, monuron—3-(p-chlorophenyl)-l, 1-dimethylurea—formerly known as CMU, was registered with a federal residue tolerence of 1 ppm—one part per million—for limited use in Valencia and navel orange orchards during the fall of 1955.
Weed control near grass areas: Soil fumigants and contact spray materials included in series of studies on control of weeds in relatively confined areas
by M. H. Kimball, Boysie Day, Chester L. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Machine and chemical methods of weed control in relatively restricted areas—flower beds, ornamental trees and shrubs, small drainage channels, parking areas and patios—are not adaptable to most situations or are hazardous to adjacent plantings.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Machine and chemical methods of weed control in relatively restricted areas—flower beds, ornamental trees and shrubs, small drainage channels, parking areas and patios—are not adaptable to most situations or are hazardous to adjacent plantings.

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