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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.1

Leaf absorption of sodium and chloride
January 1957
Volume 11, Number 1

Research articles

Surface discoloration of pears: Compression pads between fruit and carton lid effectively prevent transit bruising of jumble-packed Bartlett pears
by Noel F. Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Brown surface discoloration damage to Bartlett pears shipped in jumble-packed fiberboard cartons—during the 1955 season—caused complaints in eastern markets, particularly following rail shipments. Consequently, laboratory tests were conducted during the 1956 pear season to obtain information on the nature of the discoloration and its prevention.
Brown surface discoloration damage to Bartlett pears shipped in jumble-packed fiberboard cartons—during the 1955 season—caused complaints in eastern markets, particularly following rail shipments. Consequently, laboratory tests were conducted during the 1956 pear season to obtain information on the nature of the discoloration and its prevention.
Frost injury to range annuals: Nitrogen fertilization applied in fall found to reduce frost burn and extend growing season of annuals on foothill ranges
by Horton M. Laude, Lester J. Berry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Late fall applications of nitrogenous fertilizers to California foothill ranges have consistently hastened the growth of native forage plants both in fall and spring, resulting in a winter forage production which may be advanced as much as two months. Also, the herbage produced by fertilized plants is not subject to frost damage to the same extent as that produced by unfertilized plants.
Late fall applications of nitrogenous fertilizers to California foothill ranges have consistently hastened the growth of native forage plants both in fall and spring, resulting in a winter forage production which may be advanced as much as two months. Also, the herbage produced by fertilized plants is not subject to frost damage to the same extent as that produced by unfertilized plants.
Control of European red mite: Good control obtained with new acaricides but some resistance indicates future prebloom treatments may not be feasible
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Previous experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of prebloom sprays for control of European red mite eggs.
Previous experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of prebloom sprays for control of European red mite eggs.
Soil drainage near Guadalupe: Observation wells used in study of drainage conditions as part of investigation of factors affecting plant growth
by James N. Luthin, Harwood Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Water table conditions especially were studied in the Guadalupe area during an investigation designed to obtain more information about the physical conditions affecting plant growth in the lower Santa Maria Valley.
Water table conditions especially were studied in the Guadalupe area during an investigation designed to obtain more information about the physical conditions affecting plant growth in the lower Santa Maria Valley.
Leaf burn on sprinkled citrus: Factors affecting leaf absorption of sodium and chloride from water sprinkler-applied to citrus and avocados studied
by Robert B. Harding, Marvin P. Miller, Milton Fireman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Leaf burn and defoliation on the lower part of the tree found in the fall of 1955 in several citrus orchards in Riverside County—recently converted to the lowhead type of sprinkler irrigation—led to a preliminary survey of citrus and avocado orchards in the county. Leaf burn on the skirts of sprinkled citrus orchards was found in the Hemet, La Sierra, Corona, and Coachella Valley areas. Varieties included grapefruit, Valencia and navel orange, and tangerine. Sprinkled avocado orchards did not show the marked burn on the tree skirts found in citrus. In some cases, a white salt residue was found on the citrus leaves on the portion of the tree that was wetted during sprinkling. The upper part of the tree which received no water spray during irrigation showed no burn or defoliation.
Leaf burn and defoliation on the lower part of the tree found in the fall of 1955 in several citrus orchards in Riverside County—recently converted to the lowhead type of sprinkler irrigation—led to a preliminary survey of citrus and avocado orchards in the county. Leaf burn on the skirts of sprinkled citrus orchards was found in the Hemet, La Sierra, Corona, and Coachella Valley areas. Varieties included grapefruit, Valencia and navel orange, and tangerine. Sprinkled avocado orchards did not show the marked burn on the tree skirts found in citrus. In some cases, a white salt residue was found on the citrus leaves on the portion of the tree that was wetted during sprinkling. The upper part of the tree which received no water spray during irrigation showed no burn or defoliation.
Loss of magnesium from soil: Effect of fertilizers on content of exchangeable magnesium in citrus soil studied in long-range fertility investigation
by P. F. Pratt, R. B. Harding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Relatively large losses of magnesium from the soil in the long-term fertility trial plot at Riverside—during a 28-year period—were revealed by analysis of soil samples taken in 1927 and in 1955. The losses of magnesium increased with increase in amount of fertilizers and gypsum added to the soil.
Relatively large losses of magnesium from the soil in the long-term fertility trial plot at Riverside—during a 28-year period—were revealed by analysis of soil samples taken in 1927 and in 1955. The losses of magnesium increased with increase in amount of fertilizers and gypsum added to the soil.
Fig mosaic transmitted by mite: First tree virus demonstrated to be transmitted by a mite found in studies on relationship of fig mite to fig mosaic
by R. A. Flock, J. M. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The fig mite—Aceria ficus (Cotte) — was shown to transmit fig mosaic virus in experiments set up to determine whether or not mosaic symptoms would persist on fig plants in the absence of fig mite infestations.
The fig mite—Aceria ficus (Cotte) — was shown to transmit fig mosaic virus in experiments set up to determine whether or not mosaic symptoms would persist on fig plants in the absence of fig mite infestations.
Declining yields in oranges: Appraisal of 220 mature orange orchards in five counties indicates possible causes of downward trend in production
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Average production of southern California oranges dropped from 370 to 265 field boxes per acre—for navels—and from 290 to 265 field boxes per acre—for Valencias—over a 12-year period. Many individual orchards in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Orange counties—the three areas most seriously affected—showed a production decline of as much as 100 to 250 field boxes per acre during the same period.
Average production of southern California oranges dropped from 370 to 265 field boxes per acre—for navels—and from 290 to 265 field boxes per acre—for Valencias—over a 12-year period. Many individual orchards in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Orange counties—the three areas most seriously affected—showed a production decline of as much as 100 to 250 field boxes per acre during the same period.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 11, No.1

Leaf absorption of sodium and chloride
January 1957
Volume 11, Number 1

Research articles

Surface discoloration of pears: Compression pads between fruit and carton lid effectively prevent transit bruising of jumble-packed Bartlett pears
by Noel F. Sommer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Brown surface discoloration damage to Bartlett pears shipped in jumble-packed fiberboard cartons—during the 1955 season—caused complaints in eastern markets, particularly following rail shipments. Consequently, laboratory tests were conducted during the 1956 pear season to obtain information on the nature of the discoloration and its prevention.
Brown surface discoloration damage to Bartlett pears shipped in jumble-packed fiberboard cartons—during the 1955 season—caused complaints in eastern markets, particularly following rail shipments. Consequently, laboratory tests were conducted during the 1956 pear season to obtain information on the nature of the discoloration and its prevention.
Frost injury to range annuals: Nitrogen fertilization applied in fall found to reduce frost burn and extend growing season of annuals on foothill ranges
by Horton M. Laude, Lester J. Berry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Late fall applications of nitrogenous fertilizers to California foothill ranges have consistently hastened the growth of native forage plants both in fall and spring, resulting in a winter forage production which may be advanced as much as two months. Also, the herbage produced by fertilized plants is not subject to frost damage to the same extent as that produced by unfertilized plants.
Late fall applications of nitrogenous fertilizers to California foothill ranges have consistently hastened the growth of native forage plants both in fall and spring, resulting in a winter forage production which may be advanced as much as two months. Also, the herbage produced by fertilized plants is not subject to frost damage to the same extent as that produced by unfertilized plants.
Control of European red mite: Good control obtained with new acaricides but some resistance indicates future prebloom treatments may not be feasible
by Harold F. Madsen, Stanley C. Hoyt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Previous experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of prebloom sprays for control of European red mite eggs.
Previous experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of prebloom sprays for control of European red mite eggs.
Soil drainage near Guadalupe: Observation wells used in study of drainage conditions as part of investigation of factors affecting plant growth
by James N. Luthin, Harwood Hall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Water table conditions especially were studied in the Guadalupe area during an investigation designed to obtain more information about the physical conditions affecting plant growth in the lower Santa Maria Valley.
Water table conditions especially were studied in the Guadalupe area during an investigation designed to obtain more information about the physical conditions affecting plant growth in the lower Santa Maria Valley.
Leaf burn on sprinkled citrus: Factors affecting leaf absorption of sodium and chloride from water sprinkler-applied to citrus and avocados studied
by Robert B. Harding, Marvin P. Miller, Milton Fireman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Leaf burn and defoliation on the lower part of the tree found in the fall of 1955 in several citrus orchards in Riverside County—recently converted to the lowhead type of sprinkler irrigation—led to a preliminary survey of citrus and avocado orchards in the county. Leaf burn on the skirts of sprinkled citrus orchards was found in the Hemet, La Sierra, Corona, and Coachella Valley areas. Varieties included grapefruit, Valencia and navel orange, and tangerine. Sprinkled avocado orchards did not show the marked burn on the tree skirts found in citrus. In some cases, a white salt residue was found on the citrus leaves on the portion of the tree that was wetted during sprinkling. The upper part of the tree which received no water spray during irrigation showed no burn or defoliation.
Leaf burn and defoliation on the lower part of the tree found in the fall of 1955 in several citrus orchards in Riverside County—recently converted to the lowhead type of sprinkler irrigation—led to a preliminary survey of citrus and avocado orchards in the county. Leaf burn on the skirts of sprinkled citrus orchards was found in the Hemet, La Sierra, Corona, and Coachella Valley areas. Varieties included grapefruit, Valencia and navel orange, and tangerine. Sprinkled avocado orchards did not show the marked burn on the tree skirts found in citrus. In some cases, a white salt residue was found on the citrus leaves on the portion of the tree that was wetted during sprinkling. The upper part of the tree which received no water spray during irrigation showed no burn or defoliation.
Loss of magnesium from soil: Effect of fertilizers on content of exchangeable magnesium in citrus soil studied in long-range fertility investigation
by P. F. Pratt, R. B. Harding
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Relatively large losses of magnesium from the soil in the long-term fertility trial plot at Riverside—during a 28-year period—were revealed by analysis of soil samples taken in 1927 and in 1955. The losses of magnesium increased with increase in amount of fertilizers and gypsum added to the soil.
Relatively large losses of magnesium from the soil in the long-term fertility trial plot at Riverside—during a 28-year period—were revealed by analysis of soil samples taken in 1927 and in 1955. The losses of magnesium increased with increase in amount of fertilizers and gypsum added to the soil.
Fig mosaic transmitted by mite: First tree virus demonstrated to be transmitted by a mite found in studies on relationship of fig mite to fig mosaic
by R. A. Flock, J. M. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The fig mite—Aceria ficus (Cotte) — was shown to transmit fig mosaic virus in experiments set up to determine whether or not mosaic symptoms would persist on fig plants in the absence of fig mite infestations.
The fig mite—Aceria ficus (Cotte) — was shown to transmit fig mosaic virus in experiments set up to determine whether or not mosaic symptoms would persist on fig plants in the absence of fig mite infestations.
Declining yields in oranges: Appraisal of 220 mature orange orchards in five counties indicates possible causes of downward trend in production
by Paul W. Moore, Edward Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Average production of southern California oranges dropped from 370 to 265 field boxes per acre—for navels—and from 290 to 265 field boxes per acre—for Valencias—over a 12-year period. Many individual orchards in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Orange counties—the three areas most seriously affected—showed a production decline of as much as 100 to 250 field boxes per acre during the same period.
Average production of southern California oranges dropped from 370 to 265 field boxes per acre—for navels—and from 290 to 265 field boxes per acre—for Valencias—over a 12-year period. Many individual orchards in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Orange counties—the three areas most seriously affected—showed a production decline of as much as 100 to 250 field boxes per acre during the same period.

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