California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.12

Forage production increased over 300%
December 1956
Volume 10, Number 12

Research articles

Natural radioactive isotopes: Soil atmospheres high in radioactivity when compared with the open atmosphere due to releases by soils and rocks
by P. R. Stout, C. C. Delwiche
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: G. B. Jones, C.S.I.R.O., Division of Biochemistry and General Nutrition, University of Adelaide, participated in the studies on which the following article is based.
G. B. Jones, C.S.I.R.O., Division of Biochemistry and General Nutrition, University of Adelaide, participated in the studies on which the following article is based.
Growth regulating metabolites: Gibberellin compounds derived from rice disease-producing fungus exhibit powerful plant growth regulating properties
by Lawrence Rappaport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gibberellins, chemical compounds exhibiting a variety of remarkable growth regulating properties, are metabolites—products of metabolism—of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus which causes a disease of rice characterized by pronounced stem elongation and, ultimately, death of the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gibberellins, chemical compounds exhibiting a variety of remarkable growth regulating properties, are metabolites—products of metabolism—of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus which causes a disease of rice characterized by pronounced stem elongation and, ultimately, death of the plant.
Fertilizer injury to lettuce: Damage reproduced by application of toxic concentrations of inorganic commercial fertilizer materials or animal manure
by R. G. Grogan, F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field studies of a disease of lettuce that has caused considerable damage to commercial plantings in California revealed the relative toxicity to lettuce of several fertilizers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field studies of a disease of lettuce that has caused considerable damage to commercial plantings in California revealed the relative toxicity to lettuce of several fertilizers.
Milo for laying hens efficient: No significant differences between corn and milo in rations for laying hens were found in two on-the-farm feeding trials
by R. H. Adolph, C. R. Grau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Feeding trials——extending over two six-weeks periods—indicate that milo and corn are of equal value for laying hens, as measured by egg production, egg weight, mortality, culling, and feed efficiency. Although both grains are widely used, corn is usually more expensive than milo in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Feeding trials——extending over two six-weeks periods—indicate that milo and corn are of equal value for laying hens, as measured by egg production, egg weight, mortality, culling, and feed efficiency. Although both grains are widely used, corn is usually more expensive than milo in California.
Rose clover yield and quality: Applications of superphosphate increased forage production over 300% and protein content 70% in Placer County trials
by Walter H. Johnson, W. A. Williams, W. E. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In a study carried out during the 1955-56 season near Lincoln, applications of superphosphate to a stand of rose clover increased forage production from 778 pounds per acre to 3,300 pounds per acre—over 300%—and improved forage quality by increasing the protein content 70%, from 8% up to 14%, and the phosphorus level in feed 66%, from 0.15% to 0.25%.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In a study carried out during the 1955-56 season near Lincoln, applications of superphosphate to a stand of rose clover increased forage production from 778 pounds per acre to 3,300 pounds per acre—over 300%—and improved forage quality by increasing the protein content 70%, from 8% up to 14%, and the phosphorus level in feed 66%, from 0.15% to 0.25%.
Nitrate in lemon soil cultures: Nutrient experiments show increased nitrate concentrations improved tree growth and yield but with a loss in fruit size
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogenous fertilizers—in some form—are applied to most lemon orchards and in the majority of cases constitute the only fertilizers used. The growing of legume or other cover crops for the most part has been abandoned.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogenous fertilizers—in some form—are applied to most lemon orchards and in the majority of cases constitute the only fertilizers used. The growing of legume or other cover crops for the most part has been abandoned.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.12

Forage production increased over 300%
December 1956
Volume 10, Number 12

Research articles

Natural radioactive isotopes: Soil atmospheres high in radioactivity when compared with the open atmosphere due to releases by soils and rocks
by P. R. Stout, C. C. Delwiche
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: G. B. Jones, C.S.I.R.O., Division of Biochemistry and General Nutrition, University of Adelaide, participated in the studies on which the following article is based.
G. B. Jones, C.S.I.R.O., Division of Biochemistry and General Nutrition, University of Adelaide, participated in the studies on which the following article is based.
Growth regulating metabolites: Gibberellin compounds derived from rice disease-producing fungus exhibit powerful plant growth regulating properties
by Lawrence Rappaport
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gibberellins, chemical compounds exhibiting a variety of remarkable growth regulating properties, are metabolites—products of metabolism—of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus which causes a disease of rice characterized by pronounced stem elongation and, ultimately, death of the plant.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The gibberellins, chemical compounds exhibiting a variety of remarkable growth regulating properties, are metabolites—products of metabolism—of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus which causes a disease of rice characterized by pronounced stem elongation and, ultimately, death of the plant.
Fertilizer injury to lettuce: Damage reproduced by application of toxic concentrations of inorganic commercial fertilizer materials or animal manure
by R. G. Grogan, F. W. Zink
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field studies of a disease of lettuce that has caused considerable damage to commercial plantings in California revealed the relative toxicity to lettuce of several fertilizers.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Greenhouse and field studies of a disease of lettuce that has caused considerable damage to commercial plantings in California revealed the relative toxicity to lettuce of several fertilizers.
Milo for laying hens efficient: No significant differences between corn and milo in rations for laying hens were found in two on-the-farm feeding trials
by R. H. Adolph, C. R. Grau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Feeding trials——extending over two six-weeks periods—indicate that milo and corn are of equal value for laying hens, as measured by egg production, egg weight, mortality, culling, and feed efficiency. Although both grains are widely used, corn is usually more expensive than milo in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Feeding trials——extending over two six-weeks periods—indicate that milo and corn are of equal value for laying hens, as measured by egg production, egg weight, mortality, culling, and feed efficiency. Although both grains are widely used, corn is usually more expensive than milo in California.
Rose clover yield and quality: Applications of superphosphate increased forage production over 300% and protein content 70% in Placer County trials
by Walter H. Johnson, W. A. Williams, W. E. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: In a study carried out during the 1955-56 season near Lincoln, applications of superphosphate to a stand of rose clover increased forage production from 778 pounds per acre to 3,300 pounds per acre—over 300%—and improved forage quality by increasing the protein content 70%, from 8% up to 14%, and the phosphorus level in feed 66%, from 0.15% to 0.25%.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In a study carried out during the 1955-56 season near Lincoln, applications of superphosphate to a stand of rose clover increased forage production from 778 pounds per acre to 3,300 pounds per acre—over 300%—and improved forage quality by increasing the protein content 70%, from 8% up to 14%, and the phosphorus level in feed 66%, from 0.15% to 0.25%.
Nitrate in lemon soil cultures: Nutrient experiments show increased nitrate concentrations improved tree growth and yield but with a loss in fruit size
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogenous fertilizers—in some form—are applied to most lemon orchards and in the majority of cases constitute the only fertilizers used. The growing of legume or other cover crops for the most part has been abandoned.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nitrogenous fertilizers—in some form—are applied to most lemon orchards and in the majority of cases constitute the only fertilizers used. The growing of legume or other cover crops for the most part has been abandoned.

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