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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.11

Timing prescribed burns in pine
November 1956
Volume 10, Number 11

Research articles

House packing western lettuce: Changing methods of harvesting head lettuce in the Salinas district create problems for operators of packing houses
by R. V. Enochian, F. J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following brief article is based on a detailed study by the same authors to be published as a mimeographed report of the Guanine Foundation of Agicdtural Economics
The following brief article is based on a detailed study by the same authors to be published as a mimeographed report of the Guanine Foundation of Agicdtural Economics.
Reduction of wildfire hazard: Correct timing of prescribed burning of dead vegetation in timber reduces danger of uncontrolled fires in those areas
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dangerous fire situations may be created in areas of second-growth ponderosa pine left unburned for a number of years and thereby permitting a buildup of dead shrubs, needles and other litter—the rough—as well as overpopulations of small trees. When such areas are burned by wildfire in summer, or fall, all living vegetation is apt to be killed and a poor land condition results.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dangerous fire situations may be created in areas of second-growth ponderosa pine left unburned for a number of years and thereby permitting a buildup of dead shrubs, needles and other litter—the rough—as well as overpopulations of small trees. When such areas are burned by wildfire in summer, or fall, all living vegetation is apt to be killed and a poor land condition results.
Gains of two types of lambs: Suffolk cross lambs from whiteface ewes showed slightly faster gains than Corriedale crosses in comparative study
by D. W. Cassard, W. C. Weir, D. T. Torell, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Range wether lambs sired by Suffolk rams gained slightly faster than lambs— from similar ewes—sired by Corriedale rams, during the fattening period on native range or irrigated pasture.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Range wether lambs sired by Suffolk rams gained slightly faster than lambs— from similar ewes—sired by Corriedale rams, during the fattening period on native range or irrigated pasture.
Aqua and anhydrous ammonia: Good sources of nitrogen fertilizers but materials should be placed well away from plants to lessen chance of injury
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant injury resulting from the use of aqua ammonia or anhydrous ammonia as sources of nitrogen has occurred when the materials were placed relatively close to young plants and—usually—at high rate of application. Ammonia injury reduces plant growth, delays maturity and yields are unsatisfactory. Usually injury is characterized by a burning-off of the smaller plant roots and by a yellowing or browning of the larger roots.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant injury resulting from the use of aqua ammonia or anhydrous ammonia as sources of nitrogen has occurred when the materials were placed relatively close to young plants and—usually—at high rate of application. Ammonia injury reduces plant growth, delays maturity and yields are unsatisfactory. Usually injury is characterized by a burning-off of the smaller plant roots and by a yellowing or browning of the larger roots.
Nitrate levels for vaiencias: Tree growth improved in soil and solution cultures when nitrogen was maintained at relatively high concentrations
by A. R. C. Haas, J. N. Brurca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maintenance of high concentrations of nitrate in soil and solution cultures induced better growth in Valencia orange trees than that produced by low nitrate levels.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maintenance of high concentrations of nitrate in soil and solution cultures induced better growth in Valencia orange trees than that produced by low nitrate levels.
Phosphorus in citrus soils: Removal and redistribution of phosphorus from the soil during twenty-eight years of cropping with citrus studied
by P. F. Pratt, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil samples taken in 1955—from a 38-year-old citrus orchard—were compared with soil samples taken in 1927 when a long-term fertility trial with various fertilizer treatments was started. The main factors known to have influenced yields in the fertility trial are available nitrogen and structural conditions of the soil. The application of phosphorus fertilizers did not influence the yields or the quality of the fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil samples taken in 1955—from a 38-year-old citrus orchard—were compared with soil samples taken in 1927 when a long-term fertility trial with various fertilizer treatments was started. The main factors known to have influenced yields in the fertility trial are available nitrogen and structural conditions of the soil. The application of phosphorus fertilizers did not influence the yields or the quality of the fruit.
Pest control sprays on oranges: Effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality. subject of three-year study in southern California
by O. C. Taylor, G. E. Carman, R. M. Burns, P. W. Moore, E. M. Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fruit size measurements—to compare the effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality— were made in nine navel and six Valencia groves in southern California during the years of 1953 to 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fruit size measurements—to compare the effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality— were made in nine navel and six Valencia groves in southern California during the years of 1953 to 1956.
B Vitamin content of avocados: Studies reveal California-grown avocados are in superior group of foods as source of pantothenic acid and vitamin B
by Alice P. Hall, Jorene G. Moore, Agnes Fay Morgan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three varieties of California-grown avocados-Fuerte, Anaheim, and Hass— of four crop years, were examined for content of most of the B vitamins. The fat and water contents, and the effect of various periods of refrigeration and ripening at room temperatures also were given attention.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three varieties of California-grown avocados-Fuerte, Anaheim, and Hass— of four crop years, were examined for content of most of the B vitamins. The fat and water contents, and the effect of various periods of refrigeration and ripening at room temperatures also were given attention.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 10, No.11

Timing prescribed burns in pine
November 1956
Volume 10, Number 11

Research articles

House packing western lettuce: Changing methods of harvesting head lettuce in the Salinas district create problems for operators of packing houses
by R. V. Enochian, F. J. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The following brief article is based on a detailed study by the same authors to be published as a mimeographed report of the Guanine Foundation of Agicdtural Economics
The following brief article is based on a detailed study by the same authors to be published as a mimeographed report of the Guanine Foundation of Agicdtural Economics.
Reduction of wildfire hazard: Correct timing of prescribed burning of dead vegetation in timber reduces danger of uncontrolled fires in those areas
by H. H. Biswell, A. M. Schultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dangerous fire situations may be created in areas of second-growth ponderosa pine left unburned for a number of years and thereby permitting a buildup of dead shrubs, needles and other litter—the rough—as well as overpopulations of small trees. When such areas are burned by wildfire in summer, or fall, all living vegetation is apt to be killed and a poor land condition results.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Dangerous fire situations may be created in areas of second-growth ponderosa pine left unburned for a number of years and thereby permitting a buildup of dead shrubs, needles and other litter—the rough—as well as overpopulations of small trees. When such areas are burned by wildfire in summer, or fall, all living vegetation is apt to be killed and a poor land condition results.
Gains of two types of lambs: Suffolk cross lambs from whiteface ewes showed slightly faster gains than Corriedale crosses in comparative study
by D. W. Cassard, W. C. Weir, D. T. Torell, J. F. Wilson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Range wether lambs sired by Suffolk rams gained slightly faster than lambs— from similar ewes—sired by Corriedale rams, during the fattening period on native range or irrigated pasture.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Range wether lambs sired by Suffolk rams gained slightly faster than lambs— from similar ewes—sired by Corriedale rams, during the fattening period on native range or irrigated pasture.
Aqua and anhydrous ammonia: Good sources of nitrogen fertilizers but materials should be placed well away from plants to lessen chance of injury
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant injury resulting from the use of aqua ammonia or anhydrous ammonia as sources of nitrogen has occurred when the materials were placed relatively close to young plants and—usually—at high rate of application. Ammonia injury reduces plant growth, delays maturity and yields are unsatisfactory. Usually injury is characterized by a burning-off of the smaller plant roots and by a yellowing or browning of the larger roots.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plant injury resulting from the use of aqua ammonia or anhydrous ammonia as sources of nitrogen has occurred when the materials were placed relatively close to young plants and—usually—at high rate of application. Ammonia injury reduces plant growth, delays maturity and yields are unsatisfactory. Usually injury is characterized by a burning-off of the smaller plant roots and by a yellowing or browning of the larger roots.
Nitrate levels for vaiencias: Tree growth improved in soil and solution cultures when nitrogen was maintained at relatively high concentrations
by A. R. C. Haas, J. N. Brurca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maintenance of high concentrations of nitrate in soil and solution cultures induced better growth in Valencia orange trees than that produced by low nitrate levels.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Maintenance of high concentrations of nitrate in soil and solution cultures induced better growth in Valencia orange trees than that produced by low nitrate levels.
Phosphorus in citrus soils: Removal and redistribution of phosphorus from the soil during twenty-eight years of cropping with citrus studied
by P. F. Pratt, W. W. Jones
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil samples taken in 1955—from a 38-year-old citrus orchard—were compared with soil samples taken in 1927 when a long-term fertility trial with various fertilizer treatments was started. The main factors known to have influenced yields in the fertility trial are available nitrogen and structural conditions of the soil. The application of phosphorus fertilizers did not influence the yields or the quality of the fruit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Soil samples taken in 1955—from a 38-year-old citrus orchard—were compared with soil samples taken in 1927 when a long-term fertility trial with various fertilizer treatments was started. The main factors known to have influenced yields in the fertility trial are available nitrogen and structural conditions of the soil. The application of phosphorus fertilizers did not influence the yields or the quality of the fruit.
Pest control sprays on oranges: Effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality. subject of three-year study in southern California
by O. C. Taylor, G. E. Carman, R. M. Burns, P. W. Moore, E. M. Nauer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fruit size measurements—to compare the effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality— were made in nine navel and six Valencia groves in southern California during the years of 1953 to 1956.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fruit size measurements—to compare the effects of oil and parathion sprays on orange fruit size and quality— were made in nine navel and six Valencia groves in southern California during the years of 1953 to 1956.
B Vitamin content of avocados: Studies reveal California-grown avocados are in superior group of foods as source of pantothenic acid and vitamin B
by Alice P. Hall, Jorene G. Moore, Agnes Fay Morgan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three varieties of California-grown avocados-Fuerte, Anaheim, and Hass— of four crop years, were examined for content of most of the B vitamins. The fat and water contents, and the effect of various periods of refrigeration and ripening at room temperatures also were given attention.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Three varieties of California-grown avocados-Fuerte, Anaheim, and Hass— of four crop years, were examined for content of most of the B vitamins. The fat and water contents, and the effect of various periods of refrigeration and ripening at room temperatures also were given attention.

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