California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Serpentine leaf miner damage: Spinach losses in 1956 recall cyclic attacks by pests and need of both insecticides and natural enemies for control

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Authors

W. H. Lange, University of California
A. A. Grigarick, University of California
E. C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(3):3-5.

Published March 01, 1957

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Abstract

A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.

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Serpentine leaf miner damage: Spinach losses in 1956 recall cyclic attacks by pests and need of both insecticides and natural enemies for control

W. H. Lange, A. A. Grigarick, E. C. Carlson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Serpentine leaf miner damage: Spinach losses in 1956 recall cyclic attacks by pests and need of both insecticides and natural enemies for control

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. H. Lange, University of California
A. A. Grigarick, University of California
E. C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 11(3):3-5.

Published March 01, 1957

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A small leaf-mining agromyzid fly of omnivorous tastes—Liriomyza langei Frick—caused a 50% loss to fall spinach in the Salinas Valley in 1956. The unofficial allowable tolerance for larvae could not be met in many instances with as many as six weekly applications of combination phosphate and chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides at a total cost of $60 an acre.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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