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California Agriculture, Vol. 8, No.4

The macadamia nut studied for California
April 1954
Volume 8, Number 4

Research articles

The macadamia nut: Australian nut varieties studied as possible new crop for California
by C. A. Schroeder
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Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: A test collection of macadamia nut varieties–10 from Hawaii and five from Australia, the native home of the nut– is under study for evaluation as a commercial crop for California.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: A test collection of macadamia nut varieties–10 from Hawaii and five from Australia, the native home of the nut– is under study for evaluation as a commercial crop for California.
Exocortis transmission tests: Effect of Eureka lemon budwood in transmission of exocortis to trifoliate orange and hybrids studied
by W. P. Bitters, J. N. Brusca, Norman W. Dukeshire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The problematical nature of the exocortis disease of trifoliage orange – whether it is of a virus nature transmitted to the trifoliate stock by an infected scion which in itself may show no symptoms, whether it is transmitted by an insect vector or whether it is genetic and an inherent character of the root-stock–is under further study in an experimental planting at Riverside.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The problematical nature of the exocortis disease of trifoliage orange – whether it is of a virus nature transmitted to the trifoliate stock by an infected scion which in itself may show no symptoms, whether it is transmitted by an insect vector or whether it is genetic and an inherent character of the root-stock–is under further study in an experimental planting at Riverside.
Nitroaenen and orange production: Results of preliminary experiments indicate some groves need less nitrogen to maintain production
by W. W. Jones, T. W. Embleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Annual applications of two to three pounds of actual nitrogen per tree are commonly made in California orange orchards.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Annual applications of two to three pounds of actual nitrogen per tree are commonly made in California orange orchards.
Growth of citrus seedlings: Effect of 2,4–D available to roots of seedlings varies with concentration and seedling variety
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Little is known regarding the effect of 2,4-D–and especially of a range of 2,4-D concentration–on the growth of the tops or of the rootstock of citrus trees, although considerable information is available as to the effect of 2,4-D when applied to citrus fruit and its effect on the retention by the tree of oil-soaked citrus leaves.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Little is known regarding the effect of 2,4-D–and especially of a range of 2,4-D concentration–on the growth of the tops or of the rootstock of citrus trees, although considerable information is available as to the effect of 2,4-D when applied to citrus fruit and its effect on the retention by the tree of oil-soaked citrus leaves.
Parasites of the frosted scale: Tests in northern California show natural enemies of scale control pest when not depleted by sprays
by A. E. Michelbacher, John E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The frosted scale–Lecanium pruinosum Coquillett–occurs in most of the walnut orchards in northern California.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The frosted scale–Lecanium pruinosum Coquillett–occurs in most of the walnut orchards in northern California.
The sunflower moth: Preliminary experiments indicate parathion, DDT effective controls
by P. F. Knowles, W. H. Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Among the many insects attacking sunflowers in California the most serious is the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst).
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Among the many insects attacking sunflowers in California the most serious is the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst).
Effect of pesticides in soils: Results of insecticide absorption by the soil is subject of field and greenhouse studies
by D. L. Lindgren, L. D. Anderson, M. H. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: A potato flavor evaluation test was one phase of a coordinated investigation of the effects insecticides–absorbed by the soil–might have on plants, crops, and soils.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: A potato flavor evaluation test was one phase of a coordinated investigation of the effects insecticides–absorbed by the soil–might have on plants, crops, and soils.
Coyote brush on rangeland: Control of brush by chemicals successful in tests for reclaiming farming land in San Mateo County
by Bryan C. Sandlin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Coyote brush–Baccharis pilularis–a perennial evergreen shrub growing from two to eight feet in height, is the principal problem-brush on San Mateo County rangeland.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Coyote brush–Baccharis pilularis–a perennial evergreen shrub growing from two to eight feet in height, is the principal problem-brush on San Mateo County rangeland.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 8, No.4

The macadamia nut studied for California
April 1954
Volume 8, Number 4

Research articles

The macadamia nut: Australian nut varieties studied as possible new crop for California
by C. A. Schroeder
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: A test collection of macadamia nut varieties–10 from Hawaii and five from Australia, the native home of the nut– is under study for evaluation as a commercial crop for California.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: A test collection of macadamia nut varieties–10 from Hawaii and five from Australia, the native home of the nut– is under study for evaluation as a commercial crop for California.
Exocortis transmission tests: Effect of Eureka lemon budwood in transmission of exocortis to trifoliate orange and hybrids studied
by W. P. Bitters, J. N. Brusca, Norman W. Dukeshire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The problematical nature of the exocortis disease of trifoliage orange – whether it is of a virus nature transmitted to the trifoliate stock by an infected scion which in itself may show no symptoms, whether it is transmitted by an insect vector or whether it is genetic and an inherent character of the root-stock–is under further study in an experimental planting at Riverside.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The problematical nature of the exocortis disease of trifoliage orange – whether it is of a virus nature transmitted to the trifoliate stock by an infected scion which in itself may show no symptoms, whether it is transmitted by an insect vector or whether it is genetic and an inherent character of the root-stock–is under further study in an experimental planting at Riverside.
Nitroaenen and orange production: Results of preliminary experiments indicate some groves need less nitrogen to maintain production
by W. W. Jones, T. W. Embleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Annual applications of two to three pounds of actual nitrogen per tree are commonly made in California orange orchards.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Annual applications of two to three pounds of actual nitrogen per tree are commonly made in California orange orchards.
Growth of citrus seedlings: Effect of 2,4–D available to roots of seedlings varies with concentration and seedling variety
by A. R. C. Haas, Joseph N. Brusca
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Little is known regarding the effect of 2,4-D–and especially of a range of 2,4-D concentration–on the growth of the tops or of the rootstock of citrus trees, although considerable information is available as to the effect of 2,4-D when applied to citrus fruit and its effect on the retention by the tree of oil-soaked citrus leaves.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Little is known regarding the effect of 2,4-D–and especially of a range of 2,4-D concentration–on the growth of the tops or of the rootstock of citrus trees, although considerable information is available as to the effect of 2,4-D when applied to citrus fruit and its effect on the retention by the tree of oil-soaked citrus leaves.
Parasites of the frosted scale: Tests in northern California show natural enemies of scale control pest when not depleted by sprays
by A. E. Michelbacher, John E. Swift
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: The frosted scale–Lecanium pruinosum Coquillett–occurs in most of the walnut orchards in northern California.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: The frosted scale–Lecanium pruinosum Coquillett–occurs in most of the walnut orchards in northern California.
The sunflower moth: Preliminary experiments indicate parathion, DDT effective controls
by P. F. Knowles, W. H. Lange
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Among the many insects attacking sunflowers in California the most serious is the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst).
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Among the many insects attacking sunflowers in California the most serious is the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst).
Effect of pesticides in soils: Results of insecticide absorption by the soil is subject of field and greenhouse studies
by D. L. Lindgren, L. D. Anderson, M. H. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: A potato flavor evaluation test was one phase of a coordinated investigation of the effects insecticides–absorbed by the soil–might have on plants, crops, and soils.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: A potato flavor evaluation test was one phase of a coordinated investigation of the effects insecticides–absorbed by the soil–might have on plants, crops, and soils.
Coyote brush on rangeland: Control of brush by chemicals successful in tests for reclaiming farming land in San Mateo County
by Bryan C. Sandlin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary not Available – first paragraph follows: Coyote brush–Baccharis pilularis–a perennial evergreen shrub growing from two to eight feet in height, is the principal problem-brush on San Mateo County rangeland.
Abstract not Available – first paragraph follows: Coyote brush–Baccharis pilularis–a perennial evergreen shrub growing from two to eight feet in height, is the principal problem-brush on San Mateo County rangeland.

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