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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.8

Control of the 1953 rice leaf minor outbreak
August 1953
Volume 7, Number 8

Research articles

Mechanized cotton: Effects of machine topping and use of defoliants studied
by J. R. Tavernetti, H. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering.
The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering.
Phosphated alfalfa feed-value: Preliminary studies made of feeding value of alfalfa hay from phosphate fertilized soils of the Imperial Valley
by N. R. Ittner, V. V. Rendig, R. S. Ayers, Wm. C. Weir
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: That cattle and sheep make poor gains on alfalfa hay from unphosphated soil has been a general belief among farmers in Imperial County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: That cattle and sheep make poor gains on alfalfa hay from unphosphated soil has been a general belief among farmers in Imperial County.
Garden centipede: Summer flooding has advantages in controlling pest in asparagus fields
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon, John Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The garden centipede,Scutigerella immaculate (Newp.)—a white organism about ¼″ long which lives in the soil—is difficult to control with chemicals.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The garden centipede,Scutigerella immaculate (Newp.)—a white organism about ¼″ long which lives in the soil—is difficult to control with chemicals.
Wind machines: 1953 report on frost protection tests in California citrus groves
by F. A. Brooks, D. G. Rhoades, A. S. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two or four large wind machines running together provided a greater temperature response per machine than one alone in citrus frost protection tests made in Riverside during the 1952-53 winter. The responses depended on the spacing of the machines.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two or four large wind machines running together provided a greater temperature response per machine than one alone in citrus frost protection tests made in Riverside during the 1952-53 winter. The responses depended on the spacing of the machines.
Rice leaf miner: Severe attack controlled by water management, insecticide application
by W. H. Lange, K. H. Ingebretsen, L. L. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The 1953 outbreak of the rice leaf miner, Hydrellia griseola var. scapularis Loew, is the worst reported in California since 1922.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The 1953 outbreak of the rice leaf miner, Hydrellia griseola var. scapularis Loew, is the worst reported in California since 1922.
Lime-induced chlorosis: Chelating agents a possible means of control in citrus, avocado, and other subtropicals
by A. Wallace, C. P. North
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lime-induced iron chlorosis in citrus and avocado trees may be controlled by chelating agents, such as EDTA—ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lime-induced iron chlorosis in citrus and avocado trees may be controlled by chelating agents, such as EDTA—ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.
Chlorosis in avocado: May be caused by nutrients in soil or genetic variations in the variety
by F. F. Halma, G. E. Goodall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the first article of a two-part progress report on the relative susceptibility of avocado root-stocks to chlorosis evidence was presented to the effect that young avocado trees on Guatemalan rootstocks are less tolerant to a type of chlorosis—yellowing of leaves—than trees on Mexican stocks. The evidence was based mainly on information obtained in two rootstocks plots, one located in Santa Barbara County and one in Orange County. In the former 70% and in the latter 78% of the trees on Guatemalan stocks became chlorotic about one year after planting, while only 1% of the trees on Mexican stocks in both plots showed the disorder. In November 1951, 40% of the chlorotic trees on Guatemalan stocks in the Santa Barbara County plot and 35% in the Orange County plot were either dead or seemingly beyond recovery. Since then the condition of the surviving chlorotic trees has fluctuated. In November 1952, it was uncertain as to what percentage would develop into normal trees.
In the first article of a two-part progress report on the relative susceptibility of avocado root-stocks to chlorosis evidence was presented to the effect that young avocado trees on Guatemalan rootstocks are less tolerant to a type of chlorosis—yellowing of leaves—than trees on Mexican stocks. The evidence was based mainly on information obtained in two rootstocks plots, one located in Santa Barbara County and one in Orange County. In the former 70% and in the latter 78% of the trees on Guatemalan stocks became chlorotic about one year after planting, while only 1% of the trees on Mexican stocks in both plots showed the disorder. In November 1951, 40% of the chlorotic trees on Guatemalan stocks in the Santa Barbara County plot and 35% in the Orange County plot were either dead or seemingly beyond recovery. Since then the condition of the surviving chlorotic trees has fluctuated. In November 1952, it was uncertain as to what percentage would develop into normal trees.
Pre-packaged, bulk tomatoes: Survey of Berkeley housewives reveals practices in retail buying and opinions regarding quality and price
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Housewives generally preferred buying fresh tomatoes in bulk rather than in consumer-packaged form in a survey conducted in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Housewives generally preferred buying fresh tomatoes in bulk rather than in consumer-packaged form in a survey conducted in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952.
Golden pershaw: Seed of a new winter melon of good eating quality released
by Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The golden pershaw is a new melon, seed of which was released by the Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California, in the fall of 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The golden pershaw is a new melon, seed of which was released by the Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California, in the fall of 1952.
2, 4, 5-T on apricot: Effects include early maturity, larger fruits, less preharvest drop
by Julian C. Crane
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A single application of 2,4,5-T to apricot resulted in early fruit maturity, increased fruit size, reduced preharvest fruit drop, and under certain conditions development of red color in the fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A single application of 2,4,5-T to apricot resulted in early fruit maturity, increased fruit size, reduced preharvest fruit drop, and under certain conditions development of red color in the fruit.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 7, No.8

Control of the 1953 rice leaf minor outbreak
August 1953
Volume 7, Number 8

Research articles

Mechanized cotton: Effects of machine topping and use of defoliants studied
by J. R. Tavernetti, H. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering.
The experiments reported in this article were conducted co-operatively by the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engineering.
Phosphated alfalfa feed-value: Preliminary studies made of feeding value of alfalfa hay from phosphate fertilized soils of the Imperial Valley
by N. R. Ittner, V. V. Rendig, R. S. Ayers, Wm. C. Weir
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: That cattle and sheep make poor gains on alfalfa hay from unphosphated soil has been a general belief among farmers in Imperial County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: That cattle and sheep make poor gains on alfalfa hay from unphosphated soil has been a general belief among farmers in Imperial County.
Garden centipede: Summer flooding has advantages in controlling pest in asparagus fields
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon, John Underhill
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The garden centipede,Scutigerella immaculate (Newp.)—a white organism about ¼″ long which lives in the soil—is difficult to control with chemicals.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The garden centipede,Scutigerella immaculate (Newp.)—a white organism about ¼″ long which lives in the soil—is difficult to control with chemicals.
Wind machines: 1953 report on frost protection tests in California citrus groves
by F. A. Brooks, D. G. Rhoades, A. S. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two or four large wind machines running together provided a greater temperature response per machine than one alone in citrus frost protection tests made in Riverside during the 1952-53 winter. The responses depended on the spacing of the machines.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two or four large wind machines running together provided a greater temperature response per machine than one alone in citrus frost protection tests made in Riverside during the 1952-53 winter. The responses depended on the spacing of the machines.
Rice leaf miner: Severe attack controlled by water management, insecticide application
by W. H. Lange, K. H. Ingebretsen, L. L. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The 1953 outbreak of the rice leaf miner, Hydrellia griseola var. scapularis Loew, is the worst reported in California since 1922.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The 1953 outbreak of the rice leaf miner, Hydrellia griseola var. scapularis Loew, is the worst reported in California since 1922.
Lime-induced chlorosis: Chelating agents a possible means of control in citrus, avocado, and other subtropicals
by A. Wallace, C. P. North
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lime-induced iron chlorosis in citrus and avocado trees may be controlled by chelating agents, such as EDTA—ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lime-induced iron chlorosis in citrus and avocado trees may be controlled by chelating agents, such as EDTA—ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.
Chlorosis in avocado: May be caused by nutrients in soil or genetic variations in the variety
by F. F. Halma, G. E. Goodall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In the first article of a two-part progress report on the relative susceptibility of avocado root-stocks to chlorosis evidence was presented to the effect that young avocado trees on Guatemalan rootstocks are less tolerant to a type of chlorosis—yellowing of leaves—than trees on Mexican stocks. The evidence was based mainly on information obtained in two rootstocks plots, one located in Santa Barbara County and one in Orange County. In the former 70% and in the latter 78% of the trees on Guatemalan stocks became chlorotic about one year after planting, while only 1% of the trees on Mexican stocks in both plots showed the disorder. In November 1951, 40% of the chlorotic trees on Guatemalan stocks in the Santa Barbara County plot and 35% in the Orange County plot were either dead or seemingly beyond recovery. Since then the condition of the surviving chlorotic trees has fluctuated. In November 1952, it was uncertain as to what percentage would develop into normal trees.
In the first article of a two-part progress report on the relative susceptibility of avocado root-stocks to chlorosis evidence was presented to the effect that young avocado trees on Guatemalan rootstocks are less tolerant to a type of chlorosis—yellowing of leaves—than trees on Mexican stocks. The evidence was based mainly on information obtained in two rootstocks plots, one located in Santa Barbara County and one in Orange County. In the former 70% and in the latter 78% of the trees on Guatemalan stocks became chlorotic about one year after planting, while only 1% of the trees on Mexican stocks in both plots showed the disorder. In November 1951, 40% of the chlorotic trees on Guatemalan stocks in the Santa Barbara County plot and 35% in the Orange County plot were either dead or seemingly beyond recovery. Since then the condition of the surviving chlorotic trees has fluctuated. In November 1952, it was uncertain as to what percentage would develop into normal trees.
Pre-packaged, bulk tomatoes: Survey of Berkeley housewives reveals practices in retail buying and opinions regarding quality and price
by Jessie V. Coles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Housewives generally preferred buying fresh tomatoes in bulk rather than in consumer-packaged form in a survey conducted in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Housewives generally preferred buying fresh tomatoes in bulk rather than in consumer-packaged form in a survey conducted in nine grocery stores in Berkeley in the summer of 1952.
Golden pershaw: Seed of a new winter melon of good eating quality released
by Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The golden pershaw is a new melon, seed of which was released by the Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California, in the fall of 1952.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The golden pershaw is a new melon, seed of which was released by the Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California, in the fall of 1952.
2, 4, 5-T on apricot: Effects include early maturity, larger fruits, less preharvest drop
by Julian C. Crane
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A single application of 2,4,5-T to apricot resulted in early fruit maturity, increased fruit size, reduced preharvest fruit drop, and under certain conditions development of red color in the fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A single application of 2,4,5-T to apricot resulted in early fruit maturity, increased fruit size, reduced preharvest fruit drop, and under certain conditions development of red color in the fruit.

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