California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.5

Root-knot and root-lesion nematodes
May 1952
Volume 6, Number 5

Research articles

Summer squash storage studies: Investigations of post harvest chemical changes in summer squash stored at different temperatures
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Summer squash fruits remained in marketable condition for about 14 to 17 days when stored at 32° F; for about 14 days at 50° F; for eight days at 60° F; and for six days at 70° F.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Summer squash fruits remained in marketable condition for about 14 to 17 days when stored at 32° F; for about 14 days at 50° F; for eight days at 60° F; and for six days at 70° F.
Duster equipment on tomatoes: Effectiveness of a duster with and without hood compared in field tests controlling caterpillars
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, Norman B. Akesson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Effective duster equipment saved 40% of the insecticide in caterpillar control tests in tomato fields near Woodland.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Effective duster equipment saved 40% of the insecticide in caterpillar control tests in tomato fields near Woodland.
Sprouting broccoli spacing: Five varieties studied to determine closest spacing to yield heads of freezing and fresh market standards
by F. W. Zink, D. A. Akana
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spacing of slightly more than 8″ between sprouting broccoli plants is most satisfactory.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spacing of slightly more than 8″ between sprouting broccoli plants is most satisfactory.
Spray thinning of olives: Experimental postbloom applications of hormone NAA bring undersized fruit up to canning size
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Postbloom spray thinning of olives obtained a net gain of $7.35 per tree in experiments during the 1951 season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Postbloom spray thinning of olives obtained a net gain of $7.35 per tree in experiments during the 1951 season.
Root-knot and root-lesion nematodes: Soil fumigation reduces infestations but can not be used growing orchards or vineyards
by M. W. Allen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The characteristic galls or knots on the roots of trees and vines which are caused by root-knot nematodes make this pest easy to recognize in the field.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The characteristic galls or knots on the roots of trees and vines which are caused by root-knot nematodes make this pest easy to recognize in the field.
New purple scale parasite: A second natural enemy of citrus pest established in California may be effective in low host infestations
by Stanley E. Flanders
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A second natural enemy of purple scale on citrus is established in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A second natural enemy of purple scale on citrus is established in California.
Improving prune dehydration: Work simplification study and methods analysis of current dehydrater practices suggest improvements
by Louis E. Davis, Richard A. Marks, John H. Kilbuck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a work simplification study and methods analysis undertaken for California prune growers and dehydrater operators.
This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a work simplification study and methods analysis undertaken for California prune growers and dehydrater operators.
Ant control in citrus groves: Argentine ant controlled for about six months by thorough spring application of chlordane spray
by Paul D. Gerhardt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ants—particularly Argentine ants—often interfere with the normal activities of beneficial insects attacking certain scale and mealybug pests. Therefore the chemical control of ants in citrus groves has sometimes been of value in encouraging the spread and multiplication of these beneficial insects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ants—particularly Argentine ants—often interfere with the normal activities of beneficial insects attacking certain scale and mealybug pests. Therefore the chemical control of ants in citrus groves has sometimes been of value in encouraging the spread and multiplication of these beneficial insects.
Enemies of avocado pests: Parasites and predators if protected by sparing use of insecticides will keep avocado pests in check
by Blair Bartlett, Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Southern California avocado growers enjoy a singularly fortunate position with respect to insect pests.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Southern California avocado growers enjoy a singularly fortunate position with respect to insect pests.
Baby Klondike Watermelon: Seeds of eight-inch watermelon of good eating quality commercially available in quantity
by Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The seeds of the Baby Klondike Watermelon—one of the midget melons—are available commercially in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The seeds of the Baby Klondike Watermelon—one of the midget melons—are available commercially in California.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.5

Root-knot and root-lesion nematodes
May 1952
Volume 6, Number 5

Research articles

Summer squash storage studies: Investigations of post harvest chemical changes in summer squash stored at different temperatures
by O. A. Lorenz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Summer squash fruits remained in marketable condition for about 14 to 17 days when stored at 32° F; for about 14 days at 50° F; for eight days at 60° F; and for six days at 70° F.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Summer squash fruits remained in marketable condition for about 14 to 17 days when stored at 32° F; for about 14 days at 50° F; for eight days at 60° F; and for six days at 70° F.
Duster equipment on tomatoes: Effectiveness of a duster with and without hood compared in field tests controlling caterpillars
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff, Norman B. Akesson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Effective duster equipment saved 40% of the insecticide in caterpillar control tests in tomato fields near Woodland.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Effective duster equipment saved 40% of the insecticide in caterpillar control tests in tomato fields near Woodland.
Sprouting broccoli spacing: Five varieties studied to determine closest spacing to yield heads of freezing and fresh market standards
by F. W. Zink, D. A. Akana
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spacing of slightly more than 8″ between sprouting broccoli plants is most satisfactory.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Spacing of slightly more than 8″ between sprouting broccoli plants is most satisfactory.
Spray thinning of olives: Experimental postbloom applications of hormone NAA bring undersized fruit up to canning size
by H. T. Hartmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Postbloom spray thinning of olives obtained a net gain of $7.35 per tree in experiments during the 1951 season.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Postbloom spray thinning of olives obtained a net gain of $7.35 per tree in experiments during the 1951 season.
Root-knot and root-lesion nematodes: Soil fumigation reduces infestations but can not be used growing orchards or vineyards
by M. W. Allen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The characteristic galls or knots on the roots of trees and vines which are caused by root-knot nematodes make this pest easy to recognize in the field.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The characteristic galls or knots on the roots of trees and vines which are caused by root-knot nematodes make this pest easy to recognize in the field.
New purple scale parasite: A second natural enemy of citrus pest established in California may be effective in low host infestations
by Stanley E. Flanders
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A second natural enemy of purple scale on citrus is established in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A second natural enemy of purple scale on citrus is established in California.
Improving prune dehydration: Work simplification study and methods analysis of current dehydrater practices suggest improvements
by Louis E. Davis, Richard A. Marks, John H. Kilbuck
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a work simplification study and methods analysis undertaken for California prune growers and dehydrater operators.
This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a work simplification study and methods analysis undertaken for California prune growers and dehydrater operators.
Ant control in citrus groves: Argentine ant controlled for about six months by thorough spring application of chlordane spray
by Paul D. Gerhardt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ants—particularly Argentine ants—often interfere with the normal activities of beneficial insects attacking certain scale and mealybug pests. Therefore the chemical control of ants in citrus groves has sometimes been of value in encouraging the spread and multiplication of these beneficial insects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Ants—particularly Argentine ants—often interfere with the normal activities of beneficial insects attacking certain scale and mealybug pests. Therefore the chemical control of ants in citrus groves has sometimes been of value in encouraging the spread and multiplication of these beneficial insects.
Enemies of avocado pests: Parasites and predators if protected by sparing use of insecticides will keep avocado pests in check
by Blair Bartlett, Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Southern California avocado growers enjoy a singularly fortunate position with respect to insect pests.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Southern California avocado growers enjoy a singularly fortunate position with respect to insect pests.
Baby Klondike Watermelon: Seeds of eight-inch watermelon of good eating quality commercially available in quantity
by Glen N. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The seeds of the Baby Klondike Watermelon—one of the midget melons—are available commercially in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The seeds of the Baby Klondike Watermelon—one of the midget melons—are available commercially in California.

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