California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March 1952
Volume 6, Number 3

Research articles

Rose clover as forage: Legume new to state responds to good grazing practices on annual type range, brush burns, and grain land
by R. Merton Love, Dorman C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rose clover—Trifolium hirtum All.—a forage legume recently imported to California responds favorably to the grazing treatment recommended for established perennial and desirable annual forage plants.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rose clover—Trifolium hirtum All.—a forage legume recently imported to California responds favorably to the grazing treatment recommended for established perennial and desirable annual forage plants.
Field seeding of tomatoes: Survey in Yolo County investigates performance and problems encountered under commercial conditions
by D. M. Holmberg, P. A. Minges
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately half of the 25,000-acre 1951 canning tomato crop in Yolo County was field seeded. Field seeding was first tried in Yolo County in 1946.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately half of the 25,000-acre 1951 canning tomato crop in Yolo County was field seeded. Field seeding was first tried in Yolo County in 1946.
Harvesting canning tomatoes: Survey indicates immediate savings in labor requirements and harvesting costs possible by use of improved methods
by Louis E. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Immediate reductions in labor requirements and the cost of harvesting canning tomtoes—by 20% to 30%—are possible.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Immediate reductions in labor requirements and the cost of harvesting canning tomtoes—by 20% to 30%—are possible.
Farm accounts aid management: Increasing capital required, higher costs, and smaller profit margin call for better financial records
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California farmers operate a highly commercialized business. In 1951 they took in an average of around $18,000 per farm and paid out a large portion of it in operating costs, for capital items, and in personal income taxes.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California farmers operate a highly commercialized business. In 1951 they took in an average of around $18,000 per farm and paid out a large portion of it in operating costs, for capital items, and in personal income taxes.
Quick decline studies: Top-root relationships of citrus investigated in experiments to salvage susceptible orchard trees
by W. P. Bitters, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The first of two articles on quick decline as influenced by top-root relationships
The first of two articles on quick decline as influenced by top-root relationships
California red scale: Study of prospects for biological control of pest in orange and lemon groves of San Diego County
by Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers in San Diego County have a very good chance—possibly the best chance of any citrus area—of obtaining biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.).
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers in San Diego County have a very good chance—possibly the best chance of any citrus area—of obtaining biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.).
Longevity of lemon trees: Long-term selection experiments indicate strains least likely to decline or develop shell bark
by L. D. Batchelor, E. C. Calavan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lemon decline—a deterioration of trees—shortens the period of their usefulness.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lemon decline—a deterioration of trees—shortens the period of their usefulness.
Methods for brooding chicks: Radiant panels, infrared lamps compared for electricity used, weight gains, feed needs, mortality, feathering
by Wilbor O. Wilson, Leroy C. Kleist
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two widely used brooding methods—radiant heat panels and infrared lamps—were tested in the winter and fall of 1951 on the University of California Poultry Farm at Davis.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two widely used brooding methods—radiant heat panels and infrared lamps—were tested in the winter and fall of 1951 on the University of California Poultry Farm at Davis.
Fungus on codling moth: Fungus disease in over wintering stages of the walnut pest found to be an important natural controlling agent
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A fungus disease reduces the overwintering population of the codling moth in some northern California walnut orchards.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A fungus disease reduces the overwintering population of the codling moth in some northern California walnut orchards.
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March 1952
Volume 6, Number 3

Research articles

Rose clover as forage: Legume new to state responds to good grazing practices on annual type range, brush burns, and grain land
by R. Merton Love, Dorman C. Sumner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rose clover—Trifolium hirtum All.—a forage legume recently imported to California responds favorably to the grazing treatment recommended for established perennial and desirable annual forage plants.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rose clover—Trifolium hirtum All.—a forage legume recently imported to California responds favorably to the grazing treatment recommended for established perennial and desirable annual forage plants.
Field seeding of tomatoes: Survey in Yolo County investigates performance and problems encountered under commercial conditions
by D. M. Holmberg, P. A. Minges
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately half of the 25,000-acre 1951 canning tomato crop in Yolo County was field seeded. Field seeding was first tried in Yolo County in 1946.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Approximately half of the 25,000-acre 1951 canning tomato crop in Yolo County was field seeded. Field seeding was first tried in Yolo County in 1946.
Harvesting canning tomatoes: Survey indicates immediate savings in labor requirements and harvesting costs possible by use of improved methods
by Louis E. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Immediate reductions in labor requirements and the cost of harvesting canning tomtoes—by 20% to 30%—are possible.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Immediate reductions in labor requirements and the cost of harvesting canning tomtoes—by 20% to 30%—are possible.
Farm accounts aid management: Increasing capital required, higher costs, and smaller profit margin call for better financial records
by Arthur Shultis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: California farmers operate a highly commercialized business. In 1951 they took in an average of around $18,000 per farm and paid out a large portion of it in operating costs, for capital items, and in personal income taxes.
Not available – first paragraph follows: California farmers operate a highly commercialized business. In 1951 they took in an average of around $18,000 per farm and paid out a large portion of it in operating costs, for capital items, and in personal income taxes.
Quick decline studies: Top-root relationships of citrus investigated in experiments to salvage susceptible orchard trees
by W. P. Bitters, E. R. Parker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The first of two articles on quick decline as influenced by top-root relationships
The first of two articles on quick decline as influenced by top-root relationships
California red scale: Study of prospects for biological control of pest in orange and lemon groves of San Diego County
by Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers in San Diego County have a very good chance—possibly the best chance of any citrus area—of obtaining biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.).
Not available – first paragraph follows: Citrus growers in San Diego County have a very good chance—possibly the best chance of any citrus area—of obtaining biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.).
Longevity of lemon trees: Long-term selection experiments indicate strains least likely to decline or develop shell bark
by L. D. Batchelor, E. C. Calavan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lemon decline—a deterioration of trees—shortens the period of their usefulness.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Lemon decline—a deterioration of trees—shortens the period of their usefulness.
Methods for brooding chicks: Radiant panels, infrared lamps compared for electricity used, weight gains, feed needs, mortality, feathering
by Wilbor O. Wilson, Leroy C. Kleist
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two widely used brooding methods—radiant heat panels and infrared lamps—were tested in the winter and fall of 1951 on the University of California Poultry Farm at Davis.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Two widely used brooding methods—radiant heat panels and infrared lamps—were tested in the winter and fall of 1951 on the University of California Poultry Farm at Davis.
Fungus on codling moth: Fungus disease in over wintering stages of the walnut pest found to be an important natural controlling agent
by A. E. Michelbacher, W. W. Middlekauff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A fungus disease reduces the overwintering population of the codling moth in some northern California walnut orchards.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A fungus disease reduces the overwintering population of the codling moth in some northern California walnut orchards.

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