California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.2

Livestock diet utilization for continuous growth
February 1952
Volume 6, Number 2

Research articles

Livestock diet utilization: Natural vegetation and cultivated feedstuffs should have favorable ratio to value of animal products they produce
by George H. Hart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The proper livestock diet utilizes natural vegetation and cultivated feed-stuffs to maintain continuous animal growth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The proper livestock diet utilizes natural vegetation and cultivated feed-stuffs to maintain continuous animal growth.
Die-back of blackberries: Study of causes and prevention of disease affecting Boysen and Young trailing blackberries
by Stephen Wilhelm, C. Emlen Scott, Richard A. Break
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.
Codling moth on walnut: 1951 tests compare effectiveness of conventional and air-carrier sprayers on Payne walnuts in northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Codling moth investigations in 1951 resulted in a reduction of the recommended standard lead arsenate in mixtures applied by conventional sprayers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Codling moth investigations in 1951 resulted in a reduction of the recommended standard lead arsenate in mixtures applied by conventional sprayers.
Pruning-time studies on grapes: Southern California investigations on relationship between vine pruning time and the so-called grape bud mite problem
by Martin M. Barnes, Chester L. Hemstreet, Charles L. Turzan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Vineyard pruning-time studies in southern California—for the season of 1950 and confirmed in 1951—have shown a relationship between pruning time in head-pruned vineyards and the incidence of so-called bud mite injury. This term was adopted in California following general acceptance of a diagnosis in which the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of Eriophyes vitis (Pgst.), was designated as the causal agent of certain growth abnormalities and crop losses in vineyards.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Vineyard pruning-time studies in southern California—for the season of 1950 and confirmed in 1951—have shown a relationship between pruning time in head-pruned vineyards and the incidence of so-called bud mite injury. This term was adopted in California following general acceptance of a diagnosis in which the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of Eriophyes vitis (Pgst.), was designated as the causal agent of certain growth abnormalities and crop losses in vineyards.
Virus diseases of orchids: Transmission of the virus and observation of leaf and other symptoms reveal rare diseases in California
by D. D. Jensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An article on Cattleya Flower Breaking and Cymbidium Mosaic was published in the January, 1952, issue of California Agriculture.
An article on Cattleya Flower Breaking and Cymbidium Mosaic was published in the January, 1952, issue of California Agriculture.
Citrus rootstock problems: Recommendations change as developments within citrus industry reflect influence of rootstock on tree and fruit
by W. P. Bitters, L. D. Batchelor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus rootstock problem in California has changed since the recent advent of quick decline and must be re-evaluated.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus rootstock problem in California has changed since the recent advent of quick decline and must be re-evaluated.
Citrus-root nematode: Effects on young lemon and orange trees studied in inoculation tests under controlled conditions
by R. C. Baines, O. F. Clarke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus-root nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—appears to affect the growth of young citrus trees in four ways: it may injure the bark of the roots; remove plant nutrients during feeding; impair the normal growth and functioning of the roots; and possibly inject a toxic material into the tree. Recently, investigations were undertaken to determine the effects of the nematode on young lemon and orange trees growing under controlled conditions, and to establish the causal relationship of the nematode to the frequent failure of young citrus trees to grow satisfactorily when planted on old citrus soils.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus-root nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—appears to affect the growth of young citrus trees in four ways: it may injure the bark of the roots; remove plant nutrients during feeding; impair the normal growth and functioning of the roots; and possibly inject a toxic material into the tree. Recently, investigations were undertaken to determine the effects of the nematode on young lemon and orange trees growing under controlled conditions, and to establish the causal relationship of the nematode to the frequent failure of young citrus trees to grow satisfactorily when planted on old citrus soils.
Cantaloupe fruit set: Relationship to fertilization, seed development, and fruit growth studied to determine causes of drop
by Louis K. Mann, Jeanette Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cantaloupe fruit set may be increased by removing competing fruits from the same vine, and by relying on insect pollination.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cantaloupe fruit set may be increased by removing competing fruits from the same vine, and by relying on insect pollination.
The pink bollworm: Insect pest of cotton thrives in dry climates and is difficult to control by application of insecticides
by Gordon L. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The pink bollworm is the most serious insect threat to the production of cotton in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The pink bollworm is the most serious insect threat to the production of cotton in California.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 6, No.2

Livestock diet utilization for continuous growth
February 1952
Volume 6, Number 2

Research articles

Livestock diet utilization: Natural vegetation and cultivated feedstuffs should have favorable ratio to value of animal products they produce
by George H. Hart
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The proper livestock diet utilizes natural vegetation and cultivated feed-stuffs to maintain continuous animal growth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The proper livestock diet utilizes natural vegetation and cultivated feed-stuffs to maintain continuous animal growth.
Die-back of blackberries: Study of causes and prevention of disease affecting Boysen and Young trailing blackberries
by Stephen Wilhelm, C. Emlen Scott, Richard A. Break
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A die-back disease affecting primarily the Boysen and Young trailing blackberries was prevalent in nearly all berry-growing regions of California during the winters of 1947—18 and 1948—19. It did not occur, or was much reduced in severity during the 1949-50 and 1950-51 winters.
Codling moth on walnut: 1951 tests compare effectiveness of conventional and air-carrier sprayers on Payne walnuts in northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, O. G. Bacon
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Codling moth investigations in 1951 resulted in a reduction of the recommended standard lead arsenate in mixtures applied by conventional sprayers.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Codling moth investigations in 1951 resulted in a reduction of the recommended standard lead arsenate in mixtures applied by conventional sprayers.
Pruning-time studies on grapes: Southern California investigations on relationship between vine pruning time and the so-called grape bud mite problem
by Martin M. Barnes, Chester L. Hemstreet, Charles L. Turzan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Vineyard pruning-time studies in southern California—for the season of 1950 and confirmed in 1951—have shown a relationship between pruning time in head-pruned vineyards and the incidence of so-called bud mite injury. This term was adopted in California following general acceptance of a diagnosis in which the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of Eriophyes vitis (Pgst.), was designated as the causal agent of certain growth abnormalities and crop losses in vineyards.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Vineyard pruning-time studies in southern California—for the season of 1950 and confirmed in 1951—have shown a relationship between pruning time in head-pruned vineyards and the incidence of so-called bud mite injury. This term was adopted in California following general acceptance of a diagnosis in which the grape bud mite, a physiological strain of Eriophyes vitis (Pgst.), was designated as the causal agent of certain growth abnormalities and crop losses in vineyards.
Virus diseases of orchids: Transmission of the virus and observation of leaf and other symptoms reveal rare diseases in California
by D. D. Jensen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An article on Cattleya Flower Breaking and Cymbidium Mosaic was published in the January, 1952, issue of California Agriculture.
An article on Cattleya Flower Breaking and Cymbidium Mosaic was published in the January, 1952, issue of California Agriculture.
Citrus rootstock problems: Recommendations change as developments within citrus industry reflect influence of rootstock on tree and fruit
by W. P. Bitters, L. D. Batchelor
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus rootstock problem in California has changed since the recent advent of quick decline and must be re-evaluated.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus rootstock problem in California has changed since the recent advent of quick decline and must be re-evaluated.
Citrus-root nematode: Effects on young lemon and orange trees studied in inoculation tests under controlled conditions
by R. C. Baines, O. F. Clarke
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus-root nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—appears to affect the growth of young citrus trees in four ways: it may injure the bark of the roots; remove plant nutrients during feeding; impair the normal growth and functioning of the roots; and possibly inject a toxic material into the tree. Recently, investigations were undertaken to determine the effects of the nematode on young lemon and orange trees growing under controlled conditions, and to establish the causal relationship of the nematode to the frequent failure of young citrus trees to grow satisfactorily when planted on old citrus soils.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The citrus-root nematode—Tylenchulus semipenetrans—appears to affect the growth of young citrus trees in four ways: it may injure the bark of the roots; remove plant nutrients during feeding; impair the normal growth and functioning of the roots; and possibly inject a toxic material into the tree. Recently, investigations were undertaken to determine the effects of the nematode on young lemon and orange trees growing under controlled conditions, and to establish the causal relationship of the nematode to the frequent failure of young citrus trees to grow satisfactorily when planted on old citrus soils.
Cantaloupe fruit set: Relationship to fertilization, seed development, and fruit growth studied to determine causes of drop
by Louis K. Mann, Jeanette Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cantaloupe fruit set may be increased by removing competing fruits from the same vine, and by relying on insect pollination.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Cantaloupe fruit set may be increased by removing competing fruits from the same vine, and by relying on insect pollination.
The pink bollworm: Insect pest of cotton thrives in dry climates and is difficult to control by application of insecticides
by Gordon L. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The pink bollworm is the most serious insect threat to the production of cotton in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The pink bollworm is the most serious insect threat to the production of cotton in California.

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