California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 46, No.2

Is California headed toward sustainable agriculture?
Cover:  IPM area advisor Jim Stapleton (center) has shown that polyethylene mulch can reduce water use and Verticillium wilt in first-year almond and apricot orchards. Scattered Central Valley farmers are beginning to adopt this sustainable practice. Also pictured are postgraduate researchers Roger Duncan (left) and Abraham Gamliel (right). Photo by Jack Kelly Clark
March-April 1992
Volume 46, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

A study asks: Are California's farmers headed toward sustainable agriculture?
by James I. Grieshop, Arnaz K. Raj
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growers report their practices are becoming more ecological and less conventional, but rates of change differ.
California growers surveyed in a study indicate a willingness to change their approaches to farming from “conventional” to “ecological”, a sign that some see as a movement towards a more “sustainable” agriculture. What remains to be seen: Is a real momentum gathering for sustainable agriculture—or is it all wistful thinking?
Commodity advertising pays… or does it? What it takes to keep those raisins dancing
by Hoy F. Carman, Richard D. Green, Gay J. Mandour
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California commodity groups spend more than $100 million a year on advertising and promotion, but few economic evaluations have been made.
California's farmers collectively spend more than $100 million a year to promote their products. Here are answers to such questions as: Where is the money spent? What are the public policy issues associated with government-sponsored generic commodity advertising? How successful are those campaigns? And finally, how can commodity groups improve their data bases?
Late-season nitrogen may be efficient way to increase winter wheat protein
by Bruce A. Linquist, Ken G. Cassman, Allan E. Fulton, Lee F. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Coupled with irrigation, late-season nitrogen applications can lead to efficient fertil-izer-N uptake and improved protein in winter wheat.
On-farm experiments were conducted throughout California to study the effect of early- and late-season nitrogen fertilizer applications on grain protein in winter wheat. Results indicate that early-season nitrogen application is inefficient. However, late-season nitrogen (N) applications coupled with irrigation can lead to efficient fertilizer N uptake and partitioning to grain, and increased grain protein. Late-season application was not efficiently recovered in the grain when there was midseason nitrogen application or high native soil nitrogen supply.
Competitive with soybean: White lupin could be new high-protein seed and forage for California
by Kevin J. Larson, Kenneth G. Cassman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In Davis trials, white lupin produced an average seed nitrogen yield of 234 Ib/ac, comparing favorably with soybean.
High seed and forage yields, harvested during a 2–year study, indicate white lupin could be a new winter annual legume for California. Two of the fundamental production-decision criteria, cultivar selection and planting date, were examined. Under irrigation, all seven cultivars produced high yields of high-protein seed. The planting date period that resulted in the highest seed yield was late October to early November.
In California's municipalities, saving native oaks calls for planning
by Jan M. Whittington, William D. Tietje
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Oak rangelands are coming under increasing pressure from expanding urban areas.
Regulations, incentives and educational programs, according to a new study, appear to be the most effective combination of strategies needed to maintain California's native oaks in municipalities.
Apple rootstocks evaluated for California
by Warren C. Micke, James T. Yeager, Paul M. Vossen, Richard S. Bethell, John H. Footl, Ronald H. Tyler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two semidwarfing rootstocks brought trees into bearing more quickly than domestic seedling, once California's major rootstock.
The semidwarfing rootstocks M106 and M7a usually brought apple trees into bearing earlier than did domestic seedling, formerly the major rootstock used in California. However, the more dwatfing M26 rootstock did not perform well in these studies.
To control postharvest decay and insects, moist heat treatments of strawberries are studied
by Frank T. Yoshikawa, F. Gordon Mitchell, Gene Mayer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although some decay can be controlled with moist heat treatments, the method is less useful in insect control.
Experiments with moist heat treatments of 'Chandler' strawberries at temperatures ranging from 99° to 115° F for durations of 20 to 100 minutes showed that fruit heated up to 104° F for 30 minutes were still judged marginally marketable. Although some decay can apparently be controlled with heat, it is doubtful that fruit can tolerate the amount of heat required for insect quarantines.
Resistant cultivars, fungicides combat downy mildew of spinach
by Steven T. Koike, Richard F. Smith, Kurt F. Schulbach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers rated the effectiveness of four fungicides and several spinach cultivars against downy mildew.
The recent outbreak of spinach downy mildew, caused by a new race of the pathogen, left California growers without resistant cultivars and with few chemical controls. However, two fungicides have proved effective against the pathogen and two new resistant cultivars are now commercially available on a limited basis.
New moisture meter could curb overdrying of walnuts
by James F. Thompson, Joseph A. Grant
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New instrumentation helped growers prevent overdrying, decrease energy costs and increase revenue.
Tests of a new walnut moisture meter showed that it could help dryer operators prevent over-drying, which in turn would reduce drying time, decrease energy costs and increase revenue.
Management strategies outlined: Research reveals pattern of cucurbit virus spread
by Thomas M. Perring, Charles A. Farrar, Matthew J. Blua, Keith Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A virus-management program which involves the area-wide reduction of overwintering source plants is proposed.
Diseases caused by aphid-vectored viruses result in severe economic loss to Southern California melon growers. Information gathered over the past several years has given researchers new directions for managing this production problem.

News and opinion

Land grant model: Help for the new Russia
by Seymour D. Van Gundy
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=46_2

California Agriculture, Vol. 46, No.2

Is California headed toward sustainable agriculture?
Cover:  IPM area advisor Jim Stapleton (center) has shown that polyethylene mulch can reduce water use and Verticillium wilt in first-year almond and apricot orchards. Scattered Central Valley farmers are beginning to adopt this sustainable practice. Also pictured are postgraduate researchers Roger Duncan (left) and Abraham Gamliel (right). Photo by Jack Kelly Clark
March-April 1992
Volume 46, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

A study asks: Are California's farmers headed toward sustainable agriculture?
by James I. Grieshop, Arnaz K. Raj
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Growers report their practices are becoming more ecological and less conventional, but rates of change differ.
California growers surveyed in a study indicate a willingness to change their approaches to farming from “conventional” to “ecological”, a sign that some see as a movement towards a more “sustainable” agriculture. What remains to be seen: Is a real momentum gathering for sustainable agriculture—or is it all wistful thinking?
Commodity advertising pays… or does it? What it takes to keep those raisins dancing
by Hoy F. Carman, Richard D. Green, Gay J. Mandour
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California commodity groups spend more than $100 million a year on advertising and promotion, but few economic evaluations have been made.
California's farmers collectively spend more than $100 million a year to promote their products. Here are answers to such questions as: Where is the money spent? What are the public policy issues associated with government-sponsored generic commodity advertising? How successful are those campaigns? And finally, how can commodity groups improve their data bases?
Late-season nitrogen may be efficient way to increase winter wheat protein
by Bruce A. Linquist, Ken G. Cassman, Allan E. Fulton, Lee F. Jackson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Coupled with irrigation, late-season nitrogen applications can lead to efficient fertil-izer-N uptake and improved protein in winter wheat.
On-farm experiments were conducted throughout California to study the effect of early- and late-season nitrogen fertilizer applications on grain protein in winter wheat. Results indicate that early-season nitrogen application is inefficient. However, late-season nitrogen (N) applications coupled with irrigation can lead to efficient fertilizer N uptake and partitioning to grain, and increased grain protein. Late-season application was not efficiently recovered in the grain when there was midseason nitrogen application or high native soil nitrogen supply.
Competitive with soybean: White lupin could be new high-protein seed and forage for California
by Kevin J. Larson, Kenneth G. Cassman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In Davis trials, white lupin produced an average seed nitrogen yield of 234 Ib/ac, comparing favorably with soybean.
High seed and forage yields, harvested during a 2–year study, indicate white lupin could be a new winter annual legume for California. Two of the fundamental production-decision criteria, cultivar selection and planting date, were examined. Under irrigation, all seven cultivars produced high yields of high-protein seed. The planting date period that resulted in the highest seed yield was late October to early November.
In California's municipalities, saving native oaks calls for planning
by Jan M. Whittington, William D. Tietje
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Oak rangelands are coming under increasing pressure from expanding urban areas.
Regulations, incentives and educational programs, according to a new study, appear to be the most effective combination of strategies needed to maintain California's native oaks in municipalities.
Apple rootstocks evaluated for California
by Warren C. Micke, James T. Yeager, Paul M. Vossen, Richard S. Bethell, John H. Footl, Ronald H. Tyler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Two semidwarfing rootstocks brought trees into bearing more quickly than domestic seedling, once California's major rootstock.
The semidwarfing rootstocks M106 and M7a usually brought apple trees into bearing earlier than did domestic seedling, formerly the major rootstock used in California. However, the more dwatfing M26 rootstock did not perform well in these studies.
To control postharvest decay and insects, moist heat treatments of strawberries are studied
by Frank T. Yoshikawa, F. Gordon Mitchell, Gene Mayer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although some decay can be controlled with moist heat treatments, the method is less useful in insect control.
Experiments with moist heat treatments of 'Chandler' strawberries at temperatures ranging from 99° to 115° F for durations of 20 to 100 minutes showed that fruit heated up to 104° F for 30 minutes were still judged marginally marketable. Although some decay can apparently be controlled with heat, it is doubtful that fruit can tolerate the amount of heat required for insect quarantines.
Resistant cultivars, fungicides combat downy mildew of spinach
by Steven T. Koike, Richard F. Smith, Kurt F. Schulbach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers rated the effectiveness of four fungicides and several spinach cultivars against downy mildew.
The recent outbreak of spinach downy mildew, caused by a new race of the pathogen, left California growers without resistant cultivars and with few chemical controls. However, two fungicides have proved effective against the pathogen and two new resistant cultivars are now commercially available on a limited basis.
New moisture meter could curb overdrying of walnuts
by James F. Thompson, Joseph A. Grant
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New instrumentation helped growers prevent overdrying, decrease energy costs and increase revenue.
Tests of a new walnut moisture meter showed that it could help dryer operators prevent over-drying, which in turn would reduce drying time, decrease energy costs and increase revenue.
Management strategies outlined: Research reveals pattern of cucurbit virus spread
by Thomas M. Perring, Charles A. Farrar, Matthew J. Blua, Keith Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A virus-management program which involves the area-wide reduction of overwintering source plants is proposed.
Diseases caused by aphid-vectored viruses result in severe economic loss to Southern California melon growers. Information gathered over the past several years has given researchers new directions for managing this production problem.

News and opinion

Land grant model: Help for the new Russia
by Seymour D. Van Gundy
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/