California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

November-December 1989
Volume 43, Number 6

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fusarium ear rot of corn
by R. Michael Davis, Franz R. Kegel, Wynette M. Sills, James J. Farrai
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In corn cultivar screening and research programs, UC scientists are working to control ear rot through resistance.
Yearly screenings of field corn cultivars by UC Cooperative Extension help plant breeders and growers in hybrid selection for tolerance to Fusarium ear rot. Researchers have found that thrips feeding carries the fungus into the corn ear.
Pesticide residues and cancer risks
by Sandra O. Archibald, Carl K. Winter
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Estimates of risk may differ greatly, depending on the assumptions used in calculating them.
Although the calculation of potential cancer risks from pesticide residues in foods involves much scientific uncertainty, estimates of risk are currently used to guide policy decisions. Since risk estimates may vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the assumptions used in the calculations, it is imperative that assumptions be based on the best available scientific data.
Water seepage from unlined ditches and reservoirs
by Nigel W.T. Quinn, Richard B. Smith, Charles M. Burt, Tracy S. Slavin, Stuart W. Styles, Amir Mansoubi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Annual seepage losses from such facilities in the Westlands Water District were estimated at 27,000 acre-feet.
Seepage losses in the San Joaquin Valley's Westlands Water District were estimated at 27,000 acre-feet a year, or about 2% of the district's water supply. Ditch configuration and construction techniques appear to influence seepage rates.
Wood volume equations for central coast blue gum
by Norman H. Pillsbury, Richard B. Standiford, Laurence R. Costello, Teresa Rhoades, Phyllis (Banducci) Regan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
To collect volume data using the "cut tree method," researchers cut individual trees in a stand and measured them for total height and diameter at 10-foot intervals. From that and other data, they developed equations for estimating blue gum wood volume on the central coast.
Owners and managers of blue gum eucalyptus stands will be able to use the equations to estimate the total wood volume for paper chips, biomass chips, or fuelwood. The equations were developed specifically for California's central coast.
Water marketing effects on crop-water management
by J. Letey, Ariel Dinar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A program allowing farmers to sell some of their purchased water would offer incentives for improving irrigation systems.
This study considers a water marketing system in which farmers can buy a given amount of water, at a fixed price, and sell the amount not used. The system could induce farmers to upgrade their irrigation systems and reduce water application and drainage volume, while paying for drainage water disposal and maintaining profitability.
Cold-tolerant rose clovers
by Daniel J. Drake, Roger W. Benton, Harry Carlson, Walter L. Graves
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varieties collected from "wild" stands in northern California show potential as range legumes for cold mountain areas.
Seed collected from “native” or wild stands of rose clover withstood the cold, dry conditions of mountainous northern California in exploratory trials. They are potential new legume species for colder rangeland areas.
Turfgrass alternatives with low water needs
by Victor A. Gibeault, Jewell L. Meyer, Richard Autio, Ralph Strohman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some existing species are able to do well under low irrigation - bermudagrass and seashore Paspalum, among others.
Of 27 turfgrasses and other plants evaluated for ability to provide ground cover under low irrigation, bermudagrasses and seashore Paspalum performed the best. Two species of saltbush, buffalograss, and two varieties of Phalaris also gave comparatively good cover and quality.
Suction trap reveals 60 wheat aphid species, including Russian wheat aphid
by Keith S. Pike, David Allison, Leslie Boydston, Calvin O. Qualset, Herbert E. Vogt, Charles G. Summers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Suction trap collections at UC Davis have provided useful monitoring data for pest management programs.
Effective aphid pest management strategies depend on a knowledge of the economically important species present in an area and their flight behavior. A suction trap at UC Davis collected 60 aphid species, most of which are economically important. The trap detected the first specimens of the Russian wheat aphid found in northern California.
Subclovers as living mulches for managing weeds in vegetables
by Dennis R. Pittenger, Walter L. Graves, Faustino Munoz, Harry S. Agamalian, W. Thomas Lanini
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Depending on management, subclover showed potential for suppressing weeds, with varying effects on crop yields.
Subclover mulches, which grow from fall through spring then die back before crop planting, show some potential for suppressing weeds and increasing soil organic matter. Vegetable yields varied in tests, depending on how the mulch was managed.
Chapter 12 and farm bankruptcy in California
by Robert Innes, Edward Keller, Hoy Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chapter 12 seems to meet Congress' goal of helping financially troubled farmers, but it may lead to higher interest rates on new agricultural loans.
A study of bankruptcy plans confirmed in California suggests the new Chapter 12 provisions of the Bankruptcy Code have increased the bargaining power of financially distressed farmers relative to their lenders. But Chapter 12 may lead to higher interest rates on new agricultural loans.

News and Opinion

California faces serious groundwater problems
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=43_6

November-December 1989
Volume 43, Number 6

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fusarium ear rot of corn
by R. Michael Davis, Franz R. Kegel, Wynette M. Sills, James J. Farrai
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In corn cultivar screening and research programs, UC scientists are working to control ear rot through resistance.
Yearly screenings of field corn cultivars by UC Cooperative Extension help plant breeders and growers in hybrid selection for tolerance to Fusarium ear rot. Researchers have found that thrips feeding carries the fungus into the corn ear.
Pesticide residues and cancer risks
by Sandra O. Archibald, Carl K. Winter
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Estimates of risk may differ greatly, depending on the assumptions used in calculating them.
Although the calculation of potential cancer risks from pesticide residues in foods involves much scientific uncertainty, estimates of risk are currently used to guide policy decisions. Since risk estimates may vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the assumptions used in the calculations, it is imperative that assumptions be based on the best available scientific data.
Water seepage from unlined ditches and reservoirs
by Nigel W.T. Quinn, Richard B. Smith, Charles M. Burt, Tracy S. Slavin, Stuart W. Styles, Amir Mansoubi
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Annual seepage losses from such facilities in the Westlands Water District were estimated at 27,000 acre-feet.
Seepage losses in the San Joaquin Valley's Westlands Water District were estimated at 27,000 acre-feet a year, or about 2% of the district's water supply. Ditch configuration and construction techniques appear to influence seepage rates.
Wood volume equations for central coast blue gum
by Norman H. Pillsbury, Richard B. Standiford, Laurence R. Costello, Teresa Rhoades, Phyllis (Banducci) Regan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
To collect volume data using the "cut tree method," researchers cut individual trees in a stand and measured them for total height and diameter at 10-foot intervals. From that and other data, they developed equations for estimating blue gum wood volume on the central coast.
Owners and managers of blue gum eucalyptus stands will be able to use the equations to estimate the total wood volume for paper chips, biomass chips, or fuelwood. The equations were developed specifically for California's central coast.
Water marketing effects on crop-water management
by J. Letey, Ariel Dinar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A program allowing farmers to sell some of their purchased water would offer incentives for improving irrigation systems.
This study considers a water marketing system in which farmers can buy a given amount of water, at a fixed price, and sell the amount not used. The system could induce farmers to upgrade their irrigation systems and reduce water application and drainage volume, while paying for drainage water disposal and maintaining profitability.
Cold-tolerant rose clovers
by Daniel J. Drake, Roger W. Benton, Harry Carlson, Walter L. Graves
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varieties collected from "wild" stands in northern California show potential as range legumes for cold mountain areas.
Seed collected from “native” or wild stands of rose clover withstood the cold, dry conditions of mountainous northern California in exploratory trials. They are potential new legume species for colder rangeland areas.
Turfgrass alternatives with low water needs
by Victor A. Gibeault, Jewell L. Meyer, Richard Autio, Ralph Strohman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Some existing species are able to do well under low irrigation - bermudagrass and seashore Paspalum, among others.
Of 27 turfgrasses and other plants evaluated for ability to provide ground cover under low irrigation, bermudagrasses and seashore Paspalum performed the best. Two species of saltbush, buffalograss, and two varieties of Phalaris also gave comparatively good cover and quality.
Suction trap reveals 60 wheat aphid species, including Russian wheat aphid
by Keith S. Pike, David Allison, Leslie Boydston, Calvin O. Qualset, Herbert E. Vogt, Charles G. Summers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Suction trap collections at UC Davis have provided useful monitoring data for pest management programs.
Effective aphid pest management strategies depend on a knowledge of the economically important species present in an area and their flight behavior. A suction trap at UC Davis collected 60 aphid species, most of which are economically important. The trap detected the first specimens of the Russian wheat aphid found in northern California.
Subclovers as living mulches for managing weeds in vegetables
by Dennis R. Pittenger, Walter L. Graves, Faustino Munoz, Harry S. Agamalian, W. Thomas Lanini
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Depending on management, subclover showed potential for suppressing weeds, with varying effects on crop yields.
Subclover mulches, which grow from fall through spring then die back before crop planting, show some potential for suppressing weeds and increasing soil organic matter. Vegetable yields varied in tests, depending on how the mulch was managed.
Chapter 12 and farm bankruptcy in California
by Robert Innes, Edward Keller, Hoy Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chapter 12 seems to meet Congress' goal of helping financially troubled farmers, but it may lead to higher interest rates on new agricultural loans.
A study of bankruptcy plans confirmed in California suggests the new Chapter 12 provisions of the Bankruptcy Code have increased the bargaining power of financially distressed farmers relative to their lenders. But Chapter 12 may lead to higher interest rates on new agricultural loans.

News and Opinion

California faces serious groundwater problems
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/