California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.5

Cover:  Fila, a prize-winning border collie, keeps a wary eye on sheep in an alfalfa grazing plot. The mother of Butch, the official sheep dog at UC Davis, Fila helped owner Dick Pelton move the sheep between plots in a study of the effect of grazing on alfalfa.
September-October 1988
Volume 42, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fall grazing by sheep on alfalfa
by Richard E. Pelton, Vern L. Marble, William E. Wildman, Gary Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fila, a prize-winning border collie, keeps a wary eye on sheep in an alfalfa grazing plot. The mother of Butch, the official sheep dog at UC Davis, Fila helped owner Dick Pelton move the sheep between plots in a study of the effect of grazing on alfalfa.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grazing sheep on alfalfa in the fall is widely accepted in the southern half of California, but is viewed with skepticism for a number of reasons in the northern part of the state. The greatest concern expressed by northern California growers is the possibility of increased soil compaction and subsequent reduction of water infiltration and yield. The potential for entry of pathogens into injured alfalfa crowns is also of concern. A lesser but still important concern is the possible introduction of weed seeds contained in fecal droppings or caught in the wool. We therefore began a three-year research program in the fall of 1984 at the University of California, Davis, to study the effects of fall grazing sheep on alfalfa.
Successful juice inoculation of the aphid-vectored strawberry crinkle virus
by Jean Richardson, Edward S. Sylvester
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The normally aphid-transmitted virus has been transmitted in plant juice, a first step in improving diagnosis.
May lead to a rapid method for detecting the disease in commercial strawberries
Range cow supplementation
by John R. Dunbar, Neil K. McDougald, Audrey S. Jenkins, Dave A. Daley, Bart L. Topping, William E. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effects of four common supplemental feeds were not significantly different in a three-year range study.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California annual rangeland pasture is generally poor in the fall and in short supply during winter. To correct deficiencies and maintain acceptable performance, ranchers usually provide supplemental nutrients to the range beef cow herd during the later part of the dry forage season (July to October) and the inadequate green forage season (October to January). Low profit margins, rising costs of supplemental feed and labor, and other expenses involved in distribution make the decision to supplement an important one.
Possible new race of Amorbia cuneana discovered in avocado
by J. Blair Bailey, Kirk N. Olsen, Leslie M. McDonough, Michael P. Hoffmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Trapping studies and pheromone analyses suggest California may have more than one Amorbia species or race.
The finding could be useful in developing more effective pheromone controls
Uniformity of low-energy precise-application (LEPA) irrigation machines
by Blaine R. Hanson, Lawrence J. Schwankl, Allan Fulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Machine movement characteristics and variability in soil intake may lower reported uniformities.
Machine movement and soil characteristics are important
Structural pest management: The search for new termite control strategies
by Michael K. Rust, J. Kenneth Grace, David L. Wood, Donald A. Reierson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
The economic loss due to structural pests in California is immeasurable. The state's structural pest control industry, estimated at $300 million plus, consists of more than1,200 companies and 6,000 pest control licensees. In addition, consumers pay in excess of $50 million annually for over–the–counter pesticides for use in and around the house. University of California scientists have taken the initiative in developing urban pest management during the last 30 years. These researchers and the Pest Control Operators of California recently joined forces to help provide additional professional training for the industry and stimulate research in urban pest management. The following articles on structural pests report on some of the current research in this field.
Structural pest management: Insecticide resistance affects cockroach control
by Donald A. Reierson, Michael K. Rust, Arthur J. Slater, Timothy A.M. Slater
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Despite the extensive use of insecticides, cockroaches remain one of the most widespread and troublesome of California's household and commercial pests. There are several species of cockroaches in California, but the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), is by far the most pestiferous.
Structural pest management: Characteristics of decay and insect attack in California homes
by Allison N. Brier, William A. Dost, W. Wayne Wilcox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's structural pest control industry is one of the most tightly regulated in the United States. One requirement is that a copy of each standard inspection report be filed with the state. In 1986, more than 1.5 million structural pest inspection reports were filed with the California Structural Pest Control Board (SPCB). The reports contain a wealth of information on the frequency with which wood-destroying organisms occur, their most likely areas of occurrence, the current treatments recommended to control and prevent structural pest damage, and the inspection fees and repair costs associated with controlling these pests.
Irrigation and drainage strategies in salinity problem areas
by Mark E. Grismer, Timothy K. Gates, Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A model of a hypothetical San Joaquin Valley region helps researchers assess various approaches to the problem.
Uniform irrigation systems are essential
Corn earworm outbreaks in strawberries
by William D. Wiesenborn, John T. Trumble, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Damaging outbreaks have occurred seven times in 23 years, possibly as a result of variations in the weather.
Their infrequent, but damaging, occurrences may be related to environmental factors
Causes of almond yield variations
by Jeffrey Dorfman, Melody Dorfman, Dale Heien
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Almond yields appear to be strongly influenced by region-specific effects of rainfall during the bloom period.
Statistical analysis of regional, rainfall-related effects could help early-spring forecasting
Developing guayule as a domestic rubber corp
by Ali Estilai, Himayat H. Naqvi, J. Giles Waines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers report gains in rubber yields and in capability for regrowth after harvest.
Improved production and response to multiple harvests may lead to successful commercialization
Kenaf: A new fiber crop for paper production
by Frank E. Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Irrigated kenaf yielded up to 9.5 tons per acre in the Imperial Valley but was moderately salt-sensitive.
A yield of 9.5 tons per acre was achieved in the Imperial Valley

News and opinion

Good times and bad for agricultural research
by Wilford R. Gardner
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=42_5

California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.5

Cover:  Fila, a prize-winning border collie, keeps a wary eye on sheep in an alfalfa grazing plot. The mother of Butch, the official sheep dog at UC Davis, Fila helped owner Dick Pelton move the sheep between plots in a study of the effect of grazing on alfalfa.
September-October 1988
Volume 42, Number 5

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Fall grazing by sheep on alfalfa
by Richard E. Pelton, Vern L. Marble, William E. Wildman, Gary Peterson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Fila, a prize-winning border collie, keeps a wary eye on sheep in an alfalfa grazing plot. The mother of Butch, the official sheep dog at UC Davis, Fila helped owner Dick Pelton move the sheep between plots in a study of the effect of grazing on alfalfa.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Grazing sheep on alfalfa in the fall is widely accepted in the southern half of California, but is viewed with skepticism for a number of reasons in the northern part of the state. The greatest concern expressed by northern California growers is the possibility of increased soil compaction and subsequent reduction of water infiltration and yield. The potential for entry of pathogens into injured alfalfa crowns is also of concern. A lesser but still important concern is the possible introduction of weed seeds contained in fecal droppings or caught in the wool. We therefore began a three-year research program in the fall of 1984 at the University of California, Davis, to study the effects of fall grazing sheep on alfalfa.
Successful juice inoculation of the aphid-vectored strawberry crinkle virus
by Jean Richardson, Edward S. Sylvester
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The normally aphid-transmitted virus has been transmitted in plant juice, a first step in improving diagnosis.
May lead to a rapid method for detecting the disease in commercial strawberries
Range cow supplementation
by John R. Dunbar, Neil K. McDougald, Audrey S. Jenkins, Dave A. Daley, Bart L. Topping, William E. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Effects of four common supplemental feeds were not significantly different in a three-year range study.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California annual rangeland pasture is generally poor in the fall and in short supply during winter. To correct deficiencies and maintain acceptable performance, ranchers usually provide supplemental nutrients to the range beef cow herd during the later part of the dry forage season (July to October) and the inadequate green forage season (October to January). Low profit margins, rising costs of supplemental feed and labor, and other expenses involved in distribution make the decision to supplement an important one.
Possible new race of Amorbia cuneana discovered in avocado
by J. Blair Bailey, Kirk N. Olsen, Leslie M. McDonough, Michael P. Hoffmann
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Trapping studies and pheromone analyses suggest California may have more than one Amorbia species or race.
The finding could be useful in developing more effective pheromone controls
Uniformity of low-energy precise-application (LEPA) irrigation machines
by Blaine R. Hanson, Lawrence J. Schwankl, Allan Fulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Machine movement characteristics and variability in soil intake may lower reported uniformities.
Machine movement and soil characteristics are important
Structural pest management: The search for new termite control strategies
by Michael K. Rust, J. Kenneth Grace, David L. Wood, Donald A. Reierson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
The economic loss due to structural pests in California is immeasurable. The state's structural pest control industry, estimated at $300 million plus, consists of more than1,200 companies and 6,000 pest control licensees. In addition, consumers pay in excess of $50 million annually for over–the–counter pesticides for use in and around the house. University of California scientists have taken the initiative in developing urban pest management during the last 30 years. These researchers and the Pest Control Operators of California recently joined forces to help provide additional professional training for the industry and stimulate research in urban pest management. The following articles on structural pests report on some of the current research in this field.
Structural pest management: Insecticide resistance affects cockroach control
by Donald A. Reierson, Michael K. Rust, Arthur J. Slater, Timothy A.M. Slater
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Despite the extensive use of insecticides, cockroaches remain one of the most widespread and troublesome of California's household and commercial pests. There are several species of cockroaches in California, but the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), is by far the most pestiferous.
Structural pest management: Characteristics of decay and insect attack in California homes
by Allison N. Brier, William A. Dost, W. Wayne Wilcox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University researchers have joined forces with pest control operators to improve urban pest management techniques.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California's structural pest control industry is one of the most tightly regulated in the United States. One requirement is that a copy of each standard inspection report be filed with the state. In 1986, more than 1.5 million structural pest inspection reports were filed with the California Structural Pest Control Board (SPCB). The reports contain a wealth of information on the frequency with which wood-destroying organisms occur, their most likely areas of occurrence, the current treatments recommended to control and prevent structural pest damage, and the inspection fees and repair costs associated with controlling these pests.
Irrigation and drainage strategies in salinity problem areas
by Mark E. Grismer, Timothy K. Gates, Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A model of a hypothetical San Joaquin Valley region helps researchers assess various approaches to the problem.
Uniform irrigation systems are essential
Corn earworm outbreaks in strawberries
by William D. Wiesenborn, John T. Trumble, Victor Voth
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Damaging outbreaks have occurred seven times in 23 years, possibly as a result of variations in the weather.
Their infrequent, but damaging, occurrences may be related to environmental factors
Causes of almond yield variations
by Jeffrey Dorfman, Melody Dorfman, Dale Heien
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Almond yields appear to be strongly influenced by region-specific effects of rainfall during the bloom period.
Statistical analysis of regional, rainfall-related effects could help early-spring forecasting
Developing guayule as a domestic rubber corp
by Ali Estilai, Himayat H. Naqvi, J. Giles Waines
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Researchers report gains in rubber yields and in capability for regrowth after harvest.
Improved production and response to multiple harvests may lead to successful commercialization
Kenaf: A new fiber crop for paper production
by Frank E. Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Irrigated kenaf yielded up to 9.5 tons per acre in the Imperial Valley but was moderately salt-sensitive.
A yield of 9.5 tons per acre was achieved in the Imperial Valley

News and opinion

Good times and bad for agricultural research
by Wilford R. Gardner
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/