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California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.3

Cover:  Productivity of plants and animals on a lush, fertilized legume pasture of the Sierra Foothill Range Field Station was substantially improved in a three-year study. The most profitable approach was seeding with sub and rose clovers and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. Cover photo by Charles Raguse
May-June 1988
Volume 42, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Foothill range management and fertilization improve beef cattle gains
by Charles A. Raguse, John L. Hull, Melvin R. George, James G. Morris, Kenneth L. Taggard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Productivity of plants and animals on a lush, fertilized legume pasture of the Sierra Foothill Range Field Station was substantially improved in a three-year study. The most profitable approach was seeding with sub and rose clovers and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. Cover photo by Charles Raguse
Seeding with annual legumes and fertilization of foothill ranges increased profits
Systemics prove impractical for control of eucalyptus borer
by A. D. Ali, J. Michael Henry, Jacinto Garcia
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Because of disappointing test results and high application costs, systemics aren't a practical control option.
Low response rate and high application costs make systemic insecticides a poor defense against longhorn borer
False positive tests for penicillin in milk
by Carol Collar, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A commercially available quick milk test gave false positives within 72 hours after citrus pulp feeding began
False readings are linked to feeding citrus pulp to lactating dairy cows
Economic incentives for irrigation drainage reduction
by John Letey, Ariel Dinar, Keith C. Knapp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A tiered irrigation water surcharge could provide an incentive to induce farmers to decrease drainage.
A tiered water pricing policy could give farmers an incentive to avoid excessive irrigation
Hand-harvesting jointless vs. jointed-stem tomatoes
by Mike B. Zahara, Robert W. Scheuerman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Jointless-stem varieties took 17 to 33 percent less time to pick than jointed tomatoes did, in a four-year study.
Jointless-stem fresh-market varieties take much less time to pick than jointed types
Manipulating vineyard weeds with herbicides
by Dean R. Donaldson, Clyde L. Elmore, Sherri E. Gallagher, John A. Roncoroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Selective herbicides applied once a year, controlled undesirable weeds, leaving other species as ground cover.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vineyard weeds vary from location to location but often include a broad complex of 15 to 25 species. Most vineyard managers control weeds by applying herbicides or by plowing a strip down the crop row. Weeds between the rows are controlled by discing or mowing (mechanical or chemical) in a total weed control program. In some vineyards, annual or perennial grass or broadleaf cover crops are planted between the rows.
Field-testing the sex pheromone for Amorbia cuneana in avocados
by J. Blair Bailey, Michael P. Hoffmann, Leslie M. McDonough, Kirk N. Olsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The moth-trapping information will help growers time supplementary egg parasite releases, if needed.
A simple, effective means of monitoring avocado pests
Hydrophilic polymers in potting soil mix
by Tok Furuta, Richard Autio
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three water-absorbing compounds varied in effects on irrigations needed and on plant growth.
Water-absorbing soil additives don't always reduce irrigation needs or benefit plants grown in containers
Stable fly activity on California dairies
by Bradley A. Mullens, Jeffery A. Meyer, Shirl E. Bishop, Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although present all year in some areas, stable flies peak in numbers and biting activity in May and June.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Stable flies are blood-sucking pests of cattle, horses, and other warm-blooded animals in many parts of the world. The pain associated with stable fly bites upsets livestock feeding patterns, reducing weight gains, feed efficiency, and milk production. Although few studies have been done on such losses, reductions of up to a half pound a day in weight gain and 30 to 40 percent in milk yield have been observed.
Weed control by subsurface drip irrigation
by Stephen R. Grattan, Lawrence J. Schwankl, W. Thomas Lanini
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Annual weeds were held under control without herbicides in subsurface-drip-irrigated test plots of tomatoes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Most California growers on irrigated farmland rely on the application of synthetic chemicals to control weeds. Although these chemicals are effective, there are increasing concerns about the long-term effects such materials may have on the quality of soil and water.
Drainage system performance after 20 years
by Mark E. Grismer, Ian C. Tod, Frank E. Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Old bituminous fiber and clay drains performed similarly. Neither worked as well as new plastic drains.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: As part of a study of the longevity and effectiveness of clay, bituminous fiber, and concrete drainage pipes, several pairs of these pipes were installed in a heavy clay soil at the Imperial Valley Agricultural Center at El Centro, California in January 1964. Drain lines were laid at a depth of 7 feet and a spacing of 120 feet. Bituminous-fiber drains were installed in a fiberglass envelope; washed gravel was used to enclose the clay and concrete pipes.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act: IRCA's effects on large farms
by Philip L. Martin, Stephanie Luce
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although it's still too early to know the full effects of the 1986 law, growers reported little crop loss due to labor shortages in 1987.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In August-September 1987, soon after the Immigration Reform and Control Act began to affect agriculture, we conducted a survey to determine its effects on California farm employers. Our farm labor survey was mailed to the members of several farm organizations, and the responses were analyzed by the University of California, Davis.
Initial effects of the new immigration law on California agriculture
by Howard R. Rosenberg, Jeffrey M. Perloff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 prohibits the employment of persons not legally entitled to work in the United States. It imposes on all employers new hiring and record-keeping obligations, with stiff fines for noncompliance. It creates a means of obtaining legal resident status, particularly for “special agricultural workers” (SAWS) employed during 1985-86 in fruits, vegetables, and other perishable commodities specified by the Secretary of Agriculture.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 prohibits the employment of persons not legally entitled to work in the United States. It imposes on all employers new hiring and record-keeping obligations, with stiff fines for noncompliance. It creates a means of obtaining legal resident status, particularly for “special agricultural workers” (SAWS) employed during 1985-86 in fruits, vegetables, and other perishable commodities specified by the Secretary of Agriculture.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Two sides of a coin: Basic and applied research
by Irwin W. Sherman
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.3

Cover:  Productivity of plants and animals on a lush, fertilized legume pasture of the Sierra Foothill Range Field Station was substantially improved in a three-year study. The most profitable approach was seeding with sub and rose clovers and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. Cover photo by Charles Raguse
May-June 1988
Volume 42, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Foothill range management and fertilization improve beef cattle gains
by Charles A. Raguse, John L. Hull, Melvin R. George, James G. Morris, Kenneth L. Taggard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Productivity of plants and animals on a lush, fertilized legume pasture of the Sierra Foothill Range Field Station was substantially improved in a three-year study. The most profitable approach was seeding with sub and rose clovers and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. Cover photo by Charles Raguse
Seeding with annual legumes and fertilization of foothill ranges increased profits
Systemics prove impractical for control of eucalyptus borer
by A. D. Ali, J. Michael Henry, Jacinto Garcia
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Because of disappointing test results and high application costs, systemics aren't a practical control option.
Low response rate and high application costs make systemic insecticides a poor defense against longhorn borer
False positive tests for penicillin in milk
by Carol Collar, Donald L. Bath
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A commercially available quick milk test gave false positives within 72 hours after citrus pulp feeding began
False readings are linked to feeding citrus pulp to lactating dairy cows
Economic incentives for irrigation drainage reduction
by John Letey, Ariel Dinar, Keith C. Knapp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A tiered irrigation water surcharge could provide an incentive to induce farmers to decrease drainage.
A tiered water pricing policy could give farmers an incentive to avoid excessive irrigation
Hand-harvesting jointless vs. jointed-stem tomatoes
by Mike B. Zahara, Robert W. Scheuerman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Jointless-stem varieties took 17 to 33 percent less time to pick than jointed tomatoes did, in a four-year study.
Jointless-stem fresh-market varieties take much less time to pick than jointed types
Manipulating vineyard weeds with herbicides
by Dean R. Donaldson, Clyde L. Elmore, Sherri E. Gallagher, John A. Roncoroni
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Selective herbicides applied once a year, controlled undesirable weeds, leaving other species as ground cover.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Vineyard weeds vary from location to location but often include a broad complex of 15 to 25 species. Most vineyard managers control weeds by applying herbicides or by plowing a strip down the crop row. Weeds between the rows are controlled by discing or mowing (mechanical or chemical) in a total weed control program. In some vineyards, annual or perennial grass or broadleaf cover crops are planted between the rows.
Field-testing the sex pheromone for Amorbia cuneana in avocados
by J. Blair Bailey, Michael P. Hoffmann, Leslie M. McDonough, Kirk N. Olsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The moth-trapping information will help growers time supplementary egg parasite releases, if needed.
A simple, effective means of monitoring avocado pests
Hydrophilic polymers in potting soil mix
by Tok Furuta, Richard Autio
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Three water-absorbing compounds varied in effects on irrigations needed and on plant growth.
Water-absorbing soil additives don't always reduce irrigation needs or benefit plants grown in containers
Stable fly activity on California dairies
by Bradley A. Mullens, Jeffery A. Meyer, Shirl E. Bishop, Thomas A. Shultz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although present all year in some areas, stable flies peak in numbers and biting activity in May and June.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Stable flies are blood-sucking pests of cattle, horses, and other warm-blooded animals in many parts of the world. The pain associated with stable fly bites upsets livestock feeding patterns, reducing weight gains, feed efficiency, and milk production. Although few studies have been done on such losses, reductions of up to a half pound a day in weight gain and 30 to 40 percent in milk yield have been observed.
Weed control by subsurface drip irrigation
by Stephen R. Grattan, Lawrence J. Schwankl, W. Thomas Lanini
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Annual weeds were held under control without herbicides in subsurface-drip-irrigated test plots of tomatoes.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Most California growers on irrigated farmland rely on the application of synthetic chemicals to control weeds. Although these chemicals are effective, there are increasing concerns about the long-term effects such materials may have on the quality of soil and water.
Drainage system performance after 20 years
by Mark E. Grismer, Ian C. Tod, Frank E. Robinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Old bituminous fiber and clay drains performed similarly. Neither worked as well as new plastic drains.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: As part of a study of the longevity and effectiveness of clay, bituminous fiber, and concrete drainage pipes, several pairs of these pipes were installed in a heavy clay soil at the Imperial Valley Agricultural Center at El Centro, California in January 1964. Drain lines were laid at a depth of 7 feet and a spacing of 120 feet. Bituminous-fiber drains were installed in a fiberglass envelope; washed gravel was used to enclose the clay and concrete pipes.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act: IRCA's effects on large farms
by Philip L. Martin, Stephanie Luce
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although it's still too early to know the full effects of the 1986 law, growers reported little crop loss due to labor shortages in 1987.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In August-September 1987, soon after the Immigration Reform and Control Act began to affect agriculture, we conducted a survey to determine its effects on California farm employers. Our farm labor survey was mailed to the members of several farm organizations, and the responses were analyzed by the University of California, Davis.
Initial effects of the new immigration law on California agriculture
by Howard R. Rosenberg, Jeffrey M. Perloff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 prohibits the employment of persons not legally entitled to work in the United States. It imposes on all employers new hiring and record-keeping obligations, with stiff fines for noncompliance. It creates a means of obtaining legal resident status, particularly for “special agricultural workers” (SAWS) employed during 1985-86 in fruits, vegetables, and other perishable commodities specified by the Secretary of Agriculture.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 prohibits the employment of persons not legally entitled to work in the United States. It imposes on all employers new hiring and record-keeping obligations, with stiff fines for noncompliance. It creates a means of obtaining legal resident status, particularly for “special agricultural workers” (SAWS) employed during 1985-86 in fruits, vegetables, and other perishable commodities specified by the Secretary of Agriculture.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Two sides of a coin: Basic and applied research
by Irwin W. Sherman
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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