California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.2

Cover:  Huge fields of flowers being grown for seed, such as these marigolds and petunias, are common sights in the Lompoc Valley of California near Santa Barbara. Marigolds are also grown for seed in large commercial greenhouses, where the leafminer is a pest. This article reports on the use of a parasitic wasp to control leafminers in greenhouse marigolds. Photo courtesy Bodger Seeds, Ltd., of Lompoc.
March-April 1988
Volume 42, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Sustained-release bolus for deworming dairy heifers
by Thomas A. Shultz, E. Michael Huffman, Norman F. Baker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A stainless steel-plastic tube that slowly released deworming medication was effective in heifers grazing arid irrigated pasture
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:A major source of gastrointestinal worm infestation of grazing heifers is larvae that have survived the winter on pasture grass. When these larvae are swallowed and mature inside the heifer, they produce eggs that are shed in the feces, resulting in a higher pasture contamination later in the grazing season. To break this recycling of pasture worm infestations, multiple deworming is needed. This adds labor and other costs, since the heifers are on pasture and may not be easily accessible.
What about 4-H?
by Robert E. Savage
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Specific projects and parents' participation were important reasons for youth to join and stay in 4-H.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:Modoc Countv's 4-H re-enrollment began declining inihe early 1980s from a 20-year average of 70 percent to 59 percent in 1983. Since the percentage of return membership reflects the degree to which the 4-H program is meeting clientele needs, re-enrollment is the major indicator of the program's quality. To learn why youth remain in, or leave, 4-H in Modoc County, I conducted a study over a three-year period, 1984-86.
The epidemiology of powdery mildew on tomatoes
by James C. Correll, Thomas R. Gordon, Vern J. Elliott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite substantial defoliation in some fields, fresh market tomatoes don't seem to suffer yield losses.
Fresh market tomatoes are susceptible but yields don't seem to be affected
Biological control of leafminers on greenhouse marigolds
by Kevin M. Heinz, Julie P. Newman, Michael P. Parrella
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Huge fields of flowers being grown for seed, such as these marigolds and petunias, are common sights in the Lompoc Valley of California near Santa Barbara. Marigolds are also grown for seed in large commercial greenhouses, where the leafminer is a pest. This article reports on the use of a parasitic wasp to control leafminers in greenhouse marigolds. Photo courtesy Bodger Seeds, Ltd., of Lompoc.
In greenhouse marigolds grown for seed, a parasitic wasp suppressed leafminers for two months after establishment
Predicting vineyard pruner performance
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A job-sample test can predict work performance, if the job is set up for maximum worker consistency.
A job-sample test showed high correlation with work performance
A new marketing era for California specialty crops
by Harold O. Carter, Carole Nuckton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California is no longer unique as a long-distance specialty crop shipper. Holding on to traditional markets and developing new ones will require different strategy and technology.
The rules may have changed, but California producers of specialty crops seem to have reason for cautious optimism, at least for the near term. The longer term outlook is uncertain and may depend on new marketing techniques and new technology.
Added fat in dairy feed decreases milk protein
by Edward J. DePeters, Scott J. Taylor, Curt M. Finley, Thomas R. Famula
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Added fat increased milk yield and cows' energy intake but decreased total protein and casein in milk.
The practice may reduce rather than increase cheese yield
Estimating saline water table contributions to crop water use
by Mark E. Grismer, Timothy K. Gates
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A simple equation can predict seasonal water table use by cotton.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:Researchers in several western states have found that, under arid conditions, water tables can supply as much as 60 to 70 percent of a crop's water requirement. Use of high water tables reduces irrigation needs, lowers production costs, reduces deep seepage losses, and decreases the volume of drainage water requiring disposal. Successful use of the water table also depends on the soil's water retention and transmitting properties, evapotranspiration (ET) demand, distribution of the plant root system, and salinity and toxic ion effects on crop growth. Under field conditions, many of these factors are part of the overall crop response to the saline.
A new disease of myrtle
by Amy Lutz, Albert O. Paulus, Donald M. Ferrin, Jerry A. Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemicals tested failed to control Cylindrocladium root rot, a disease now founds in myrtle in some areas.
Cylindrocladium root and crown rot, once established, is difficult to control
Blacklight monitoring of two avocado insect pests
by J. Blair Bailey, Michael P. Hoffmann, Kirk N. Olsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Blacklight trapping of moth flights indicated when supplemental parasite releases might be most effective.
Early summer flights are generally the largest, and likely to cause the most damage
Diagnosing nutrient needs of garlic
by Kent B. Tyler, Donald M. May, John P. Guerard, David Ririe, James J. Hatakeda
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Garlic shows moderate fertilizer needs, but responds to nitrogen.
Phosphorus and zinc fertilizers are rarely required. Only moderate amounts of nitrogen are needed for top yields.
New psyllid pest of California pepper tree
by James A. Downer, Pavel Svihra, Richard H. Molinar, Jack B. Fraser, Carlton S. Koehler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The insect disfigures trees by attacking tender new growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:A new psyllid pest of California pepper trees was first discovered in Long Beach, California, in July 1984. Since then, the insect has spread rapidly, particularly in coastal areas, and now occurs from San Diego County to the San Francisco Bay region. There are scattered records of its occurrence inland in San Bernardino and Kern counties.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural technology: Put the genie back in the bottle?
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 42, No.2

Cover:  Huge fields of flowers being grown for seed, such as these marigolds and petunias, are common sights in the Lompoc Valley of California near Santa Barbara. Marigolds are also grown for seed in large commercial greenhouses, where the leafminer is a pest. This article reports on the use of a parasitic wasp to control leafminers in greenhouse marigolds. Photo courtesy Bodger Seeds, Ltd., of Lompoc.
March-April 1988
Volume 42, Number 2

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Sustained-release bolus for deworming dairy heifers
by Thomas A. Shultz, E. Michael Huffman, Norman F. Baker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A stainless steel-plastic tube that slowly released deworming medication was effective in heifers grazing arid irrigated pasture
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:A major source of gastrointestinal worm infestation of grazing heifers is larvae that have survived the winter on pasture grass. When these larvae are swallowed and mature inside the heifer, they produce eggs that are shed in the feces, resulting in a higher pasture contamination later in the grazing season. To break this recycling of pasture worm infestations, multiple deworming is needed. This adds labor and other costs, since the heifers are on pasture and may not be easily accessible.
What about 4-H?
by Robert E. Savage
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Specific projects and parents' participation were important reasons for youth to join and stay in 4-H.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:Modoc Countv's 4-H re-enrollment began declining inihe early 1980s from a 20-year average of 70 percent to 59 percent in 1983. Since the percentage of return membership reflects the degree to which the 4-H program is meeting clientele needs, re-enrollment is the major indicator of the program's quality. To learn why youth remain in, or leave, 4-H in Modoc County, I conducted a study over a three-year period, 1984-86.
The epidemiology of powdery mildew on tomatoes
by James C. Correll, Thomas R. Gordon, Vern J. Elliott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite substantial defoliation in some fields, fresh market tomatoes don't seem to suffer yield losses.
Fresh market tomatoes are susceptible but yields don't seem to be affected
Biological control of leafminers on greenhouse marigolds
by Kevin M. Heinz, Julie P. Newman, Michael P. Parrella
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Huge fields of flowers being grown for seed, such as these marigolds and petunias, are common sights in the Lompoc Valley of California near Santa Barbara. Marigolds are also grown for seed in large commercial greenhouses, where the leafminer is a pest. This article reports on the use of a parasitic wasp to control leafminers in greenhouse marigolds. Photo courtesy Bodger Seeds, Ltd., of Lompoc.
In greenhouse marigolds grown for seed, a parasitic wasp suppressed leafminers for two months after establishment
Predicting vineyard pruner performance
by Gregory Encina Billikopf
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A job-sample test can predict work performance, if the job is set up for maximum worker consistency.
A job-sample test showed high correlation with work performance
A new marketing era for California specialty crops
by Harold O. Carter, Carole Nuckton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
California is no longer unique as a long-distance specialty crop shipper. Holding on to traditional markets and developing new ones will require different strategy and technology.
The rules may have changed, but California producers of specialty crops seem to have reason for cautious optimism, at least for the near term. The longer term outlook is uncertain and may depend on new marketing techniques and new technology.
Added fat in dairy feed decreases milk protein
by Edward J. DePeters, Scott J. Taylor, Curt M. Finley, Thomas R. Famula
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Added fat increased milk yield and cows' energy intake but decreased total protein and casein in milk.
The practice may reduce rather than increase cheese yield
Estimating saline water table contributions to crop water use
by Mark E. Grismer, Timothy K. Gates
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A simple equation can predict seasonal water table use by cotton.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:Researchers in several western states have found that, under arid conditions, water tables can supply as much as 60 to 70 percent of a crop's water requirement. Use of high water tables reduces irrigation needs, lowers production costs, reduces deep seepage losses, and decreases the volume of drainage water requiring disposal. Successful use of the water table also depends on the soil's water retention and transmitting properties, evapotranspiration (ET) demand, distribution of the plant root system, and salinity and toxic ion effects on crop growth. Under field conditions, many of these factors are part of the overall crop response to the saline.
A new disease of myrtle
by Amy Lutz, Albert O. Paulus, Donald M. Ferrin, Jerry A. Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Chemicals tested failed to control Cylindrocladium root rot, a disease now founds in myrtle in some areas.
Cylindrocladium root and crown rot, once established, is difficult to control
Blacklight monitoring of two avocado insect pests
by J. Blair Bailey, Michael P. Hoffmann, Kirk N. Olsen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Blacklight trapping of moth flights indicated when supplemental parasite releases might be most effective.
Early summer flights are generally the largest, and likely to cause the most damage
Diagnosing nutrient needs of garlic
by Kent B. Tyler, Donald M. May, John P. Guerard, David Ririe, James J. Hatakeda
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Garlic shows moderate fertilizer needs, but responds to nitrogen.
Phosphorus and zinc fertilizers are rarely required. Only moderate amounts of nitrogen are needed for top yields.
New psyllid pest of California pepper tree
by James A. Downer, Pavel Svihra, Richard H. Molinar, Jack B. Fraser, Carlton S. Koehler
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The insect disfigures trees by attacking tender new growth.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows:A new psyllid pest of California pepper trees was first discovered in Long Beach, California, in July 1984. Since then, the insect has spread rapidly, particularly in coastal areas, and now occurs from San Diego County to the San Francisco Bay region. There are scattered records of its occurrence inland in San Bernardino and Kern counties.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Agricultural technology: Put the genie back in the bottle?
by Kenneth R. Farrell
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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