California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

January-February 1987
Volume 41, Number 1

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Intensive management of small rangeland units increases forage and lamb productivity
by Donald A. Phillips, Milton B. Jones, D. Michael Center
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Significant increases in high-quality forage result from planting Rhizobiurn-inoculated clover seeds and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. As authors of this and the following article report, this intensive management of land for grazing lambs pays dividends by producing greater numbers of high-grade, low-fat spring lambs. (Cover photo by E. M. Roth)
Fertilizer and seed treatment allow hiaher stocking rates
Fertilization increases profitability of lamb production on small pastures
by Montague W. Demment, Milton B. Jones, Ganga P. Deo, D. Michael Center, Martin R. Dally, William A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Improved forage growth and quality nearly double gross profits of lamb production.
A comparison of three methods of pruning Gewurztraminer
by John H. Foott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cane- and spur-pruned vines produced comparable yields but were outyielded by “machine”-pruned vines.
“Machine”-pruned vines had best yields
Grape phylloxera in California
by Jeffrey Granett, Austin C. Goheen, Lloyd A. Lider
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The new biotype discovered in Napa and Sonoma counties poses some risk to vineyards on AxR-1 rootstock.
New biotype poses some risk in coastal vineyards
Night picking
by William C. Fairbank, Leslie L. Ede, Hunter Johnson, Donald A. Luvisi, Rudy A. Neja
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
With the right lighting, picking can be as efficient at night as in the daytime, and cooling energy use is reduced.
Permits major savings in cooling costs
Characteristics of women in farming
by Orville E. Thompson, Douglas Gwynn, Charlotte Sharp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Women are participating more actively in farming, largely when other sources of labor are unavailable.
Cotton seedlings can withstand some early leaf loss
by Thomas A. Kerby, Mark Keeley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New plants are most sensitive to damage at emergence, but only if most of the first leaf (cotyledon) area is lost.
Early-season navel oranges may be too sour for consumers
by Ernestine Ivans, Marie Ferree
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In taste-tests, consumers preferred navel oranges with higher sugar-to-acid ratios than were common early in the season.
Robotic egg candling system
by Antoine J. Bourely, Tien C. Hsia, K. Upadhyaya Shrinivasa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A prototype laboratory test model showed the system is feasible and could lead to large savings for egg-processing plants.

News and opinion

A mandate for watershed research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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January-February 1987
Volume 41, Number 1

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Intensive management of small rangeland units increases forage and lamb productivity
by Donald A. Phillips, Milton B. Jones, D. Michael Center
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Significant increases in high-quality forage result from planting Rhizobiurn-inoculated clover seeds and fertilizing with phosphorus and sulfur. As authors of this and the following article report, this intensive management of land for grazing lambs pays dividends by producing greater numbers of high-grade, low-fat spring lambs. (Cover photo by E. M. Roth)
Fertilizer and seed treatment allow hiaher stocking rates
Fertilization increases profitability of lamb production on small pastures
by Montague W. Demment, Milton B. Jones, Ganga P. Deo, D. Michael Center, Martin R. Dally, William A. Williams
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Improved forage growth and quality nearly double gross profits of lamb production.
A comparison of three methods of pruning Gewurztraminer
by John H. Foott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cane- and spur-pruned vines produced comparable yields but were outyielded by “machine”-pruned vines.
“Machine”-pruned vines had best yields
Grape phylloxera in California
by Jeffrey Granett, Austin C. Goheen, Lloyd A. Lider
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The new biotype discovered in Napa and Sonoma counties poses some risk to vineyards on AxR-1 rootstock.
New biotype poses some risk in coastal vineyards
Night picking
by William C. Fairbank, Leslie L. Ede, Hunter Johnson, Donald A. Luvisi, Rudy A. Neja
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
With the right lighting, picking can be as efficient at night as in the daytime, and cooling energy use is reduced.
Permits major savings in cooling costs
Characteristics of women in farming
by Orville E. Thompson, Douglas Gwynn, Charlotte Sharp
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Women are participating more actively in farming, largely when other sources of labor are unavailable.
Cotton seedlings can withstand some early leaf loss
by Thomas A. Kerby, Mark Keeley
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
New plants are most sensitive to damage at emergence, but only if most of the first leaf (cotyledon) area is lost.
Early-season navel oranges may be too sour for consumers
by Ernestine Ivans, Marie Ferree
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In taste-tests, consumers preferred navel oranges with higher sugar-to-acid ratios than were common early in the season.
Robotic egg candling system
by Antoine J. Bourely, Tien C. Hsia, K. Upadhyaya Shrinivasa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A prototype laboratory test model showed the system is feasible and could lead to large savings for egg-processing plants.

News and opinion

A mandate for watershed research
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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