California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

November-December 1986
Volume 40, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

New biological control for yellow starthistle
by Donald M. Maddox, Rouhollah Sobhian, Donald B. Joley, Aubrey Mayfield, David Supkoff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
First appearing in California in the early 1800s, this weed now infests 7.9 million acres. Bangasternus orientalis, a weevil that feeds on yellow starthistle seed heads, has been imported from southern Europe and has successfully colonized in northern California. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
A weevil from starthistle's native Euro-Asian range has been established in California
Potting soil label information is inadequate
by Dennis R. Pittenger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Ingredient lists alone aren't useful. Consumers also need to know pH, soluble salts, and aeration characteristics.
Key properties are not listed
A midge predator of potato aphids on tomatoes
by Charles A. Farrar, Thomas M. Perring, Nick C. Toscano
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although evidence isn't conclusive, a predaceous midge may be an important aid in control of this aphid.
It may be a valuable natural control
Monitoring insecticide resistance with yellow sticky cards
by Ken F. Haynes, Michael P. Parrella, John T. Trumble, Thomas A. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The cards, with insecticide-laced sticker, may prove useful in detecting leafminer resistance.
The traps can play a key role in insecticide use strategy
Induced immunelike resistance to spider mites in cotton
by Richard Karban
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cotton seedlings exposed to mite feeding or mechanical injury showed resistance to subsequent mite attack.
Plants respond to ‘vaccination’
A new growth regulator for greenhouse plants
by Gary W. Hickman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new chemical growth regulator produced more compact plants with almost no injury.
Produces more compact omamentals
‘Swan Hill’ as an ornamental olive cultivar
by Ricardo Fernandez-Escobar, George C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It's an attractive choice because of its low pollen production and lack of fruit.
Timing Manzanillo olive harvest for maximum profit
by G. Steven Sibbett, Mark W. Freeman, Louise Ferguson, Gene Welch, Don Anderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Optimum weight and size with a minimum of culls occur about halfway through the usual California “ripe” olive harvest.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

A new vice president for agriculture
by David P. Gardner
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

1986 Index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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November-December 1986
Volume 40, Number 11

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

New biological control for yellow starthistle
by Donald M. Maddox, Rouhollah Sobhian, Donald B. Joley, Aubrey Mayfield, David Supkoff
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
First appearing in California in the early 1800s, this weed now infests 7.9 million acres. Bangasternus orientalis, a weevil that feeds on yellow starthistle seed heads, has been imported from southern Europe and has successfully colonized in northern California. (Cover photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
A weevil from starthistle's native Euro-Asian range has been established in California
Potting soil label information is inadequate
by Dennis R. Pittenger
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Ingredient lists alone aren't useful. Consumers also need to know pH, soluble salts, and aeration characteristics.
Key properties are not listed
A midge predator of potato aphids on tomatoes
by Charles A. Farrar, Thomas M. Perring, Nick C. Toscano
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although evidence isn't conclusive, a predaceous midge may be an important aid in control of this aphid.
It may be a valuable natural control
Monitoring insecticide resistance with yellow sticky cards
by Ken F. Haynes, Michael P. Parrella, John T. Trumble, Thomas A. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The cards, with insecticide-laced sticker, may prove useful in detecting leafminer resistance.
The traps can play a key role in insecticide use strategy
Induced immunelike resistance to spider mites in cotton
by Richard Karban
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cotton seedlings exposed to mite feeding or mechanical injury showed resistance to subsequent mite attack.
Plants respond to ‘vaccination’
A new growth regulator for greenhouse plants
by Gary W. Hickman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A new chemical growth regulator produced more compact plants with almost no injury.
Produces more compact omamentals
‘Swan Hill’ as an ornamental olive cultivar
by Ricardo Fernandez-Escobar, George C. Martin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It's an attractive choice because of its low pollen production and lack of fruit.
Timing Manzanillo olive harvest for maximum profit
by G. Steven Sibbett, Mark W. Freeman, Louise Ferguson, Gene Welch, Don Anderson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Optimum weight and size with a minimum of culls occur about halfway through the usual California “ripe” olive harvest.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

A new vice president for agriculture
by David P. Gardner
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

1986 Index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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