California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1985
Volume 39, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Direct marketing in California
by Suzanne Vaupel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Direct marketing is the major outlet for over 8,000 growers of California's fruit and vegetable crops, and it's growing in importance. On the cover, pumpkins await buyers seeking fresh produce a t bargain prices a certified farmers' market.
Potential local markets for fresh produce
by Jill Shore Auburn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
There's room for expansion, especially in central and southern California.
Subsurface drainage evaporation ponds
by Kenneth K. Tanji, Mark E. Grismer, Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
On-farm and regional evaporation ponds for disposal of saline drain waters are increasing in the San Joaquin Valley as a result of the pending closure of Kesterson Reservoir.
Decline of navel orange trees with trifoliate orange rootstocks
by Henry Schneider, John E. Pehrson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Studies of pathological changes at the budunion indicate that two disorders are associated with decline. Cause of the disorders is unknown.
Pheromone monitoring is cost-effective
by Robin T. Ervin, Daniel S. Moreno, John L. Baritelle, Philip D. Gardner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A cost analysis indicates the savings in resources will more than pay for the research and development.
Although several beneficial insect parasites control California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell) in southern California desert citrus-growing areas, parasites are much less effective in the San Joaquin Valley. Chemical control has been the standard practice in Valley citrus, but potential development of resistance in California red scale has led to a search for alternative methods. Two articles in the May-June issue of California Agriculture discussed computer simulation of red scale populations and prediction of infestations by trapping males. The following two articles report on CRS development in relation to degree-days and on the economic value of pheromone monitoring. The research has been funded by the Citrus Research Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and University of California Integrated Pest Management Project.
Tracking CRS development by degree-days
by Richard W. Hoffmann, Charles E. Kennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Male flight patterns accurately reflected development of CRS generations in the San Joaquin Valley.
Incidence of walnut blackline disease in California's commercial orchards
by Wilbur O. Reil, Gordon A. Rowe, David E. Ramos, Sreko M. Mircetich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease once occurred only in counties near San Francisco Bay, but is now found 200 miles inland.

News and opinion

The academics and technology transfer
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1985
Volume 39, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Direct marketing in California
by Suzanne Vaupel
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Direct marketing is the major outlet for over 8,000 growers of California's fruit and vegetable crops, and it's growing in importance. On the cover, pumpkins await buyers seeking fresh produce a t bargain prices a certified farmers' market.
Potential local markets for fresh produce
by Jill Shore Auburn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
There's room for expansion, especially in central and southern California.
Subsurface drainage evaporation ponds
by Kenneth K. Tanji, Mark E. Grismer, Blaine R. Hanson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
On-farm and regional evaporation ponds for disposal of saline drain waters are increasing in the San Joaquin Valley as a result of the pending closure of Kesterson Reservoir.
Decline of navel orange trees with trifoliate orange rootstocks
by Henry Schneider, John E. Pehrson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Studies of pathological changes at the budunion indicate that two disorders are associated with decline. Cause of the disorders is unknown.
Pheromone monitoring is cost-effective
by Robin T. Ervin, Daniel S. Moreno, John L. Baritelle, Philip D. Gardner
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A cost analysis indicates the savings in resources will more than pay for the research and development.
Although several beneficial insect parasites control California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell) in southern California desert citrus-growing areas, parasites are much less effective in the San Joaquin Valley. Chemical control has been the standard practice in Valley citrus, but potential development of resistance in California red scale has led to a search for alternative methods. Two articles in the May-June issue of California Agriculture discussed computer simulation of red scale populations and prediction of infestations by trapping males. The following two articles report on CRS development in relation to degree-days and on the economic value of pheromone monitoring. The research has been funded by the Citrus Research Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and University of California Integrated Pest Management Project.
Tracking CRS development by degree-days
by Richard W. Hoffmann, Charles E. Kennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Male flight patterns accurately reflected development of CRS generations in the San Joaquin Valley.
Incidence of walnut blackline disease in California's commercial orchards
by Wilbur O. Reil, Gordon A. Rowe, David E. Ramos, Sreko M. Mircetich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The disease once occurred only in counties near San Francisco Bay, but is now found 200 miles inland.

News and opinion

The academics and technology transfer
by Lowell N. Lewis
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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