California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

Archive

April 1979
Volume 33, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Consumer responses to nutrition claims in food advertisements
by Helene Swenerton, Joyce A. Vermeersch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Data obtained from interviews with women from varying socioeconomic levels indicate that nutrition claims in ads do not attract attention as do colorful layout, appetizing food, or familiar people; that nutrition claims create a more favorable impression of a product; and that, depending on certain variables among respondents, knowledge of nutrition terms is often poor.
Nutrition claims in magazine ads are not as potent attention-getting devices as other factors but create a more favorable impression for many consumers.
Fungicides for control of chrysanthemum rust
by Arthur H. McCain, Karen Gonot
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Because some of the newer, more effective rust fungicides had not been evaluated for control of rust of chrysanthemum, a study was undertaken to identify which chemicals are most effective against the disease. Zineb and chlorothalonil provided excellent control when sprayed before infection; oxycarboxin, applied through drip or tube irrigation systems, provided excellent control with less worker exposure and no visible residue.
Growth retardants mitigate Verticillium wilt and increase yield of cotton
by Donald C. Erwin, Sing-dao Tsai, Rudolph A. Khan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Specific quantities of certain growth retardants, when applied foliarly in June or July, had a slight mitigating effect on symptoms of Verticillium wilt of cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae and increased yield of cotton 10 to 29 percent, whether it was grown on land infested by V. duhliue or not.
Disease severity of Verticillium wilt was only slightly reduced by the nonfungitoxic compounds—but yield increased between 10 and 29 percent.
Plant uptake of bromide following soil fumigation with methyl bromide
by A. Lloyd Brown, Richard G. Burau, Roland D. Meyer, Dewey J. Raski, Stephen Wilhelm, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Plants grown on soils that have been fumigated with methyl bromide usually show increased bromide concentrations. While there is a potential health hazard involved, particularly where animals consume the forage grown, this can be minimized by choice of crop and by monitoring the accumulation of bromide by plants.
The highest concentrations in plants grown on soils that have been fumigated with methyl bromide occur during the first year following fumigation.
Ozone-pesticide interactions
by Roberto R. Teso, Ronald J. Oshima, M. Ingrid Carmean
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In tests conducted to determine the effects of ozone and pesticides acting together on foliage, methomyl and ozone interacted to produce greater injury than that produced by the sum of the two applied separately, whereas diazinon and ozone interacted to produce an antagonistic response (less injury than when applied separately). These complex interactions, and the varying effects of different amounts of the substances, suggest the need for future research.
Pesticides that interact to produce less damage may be of great value in minimizing air pollution losses and should be incorporated into pest management systems where there is significant air pollution.

News and opinion

Human nutrition research needs a leader
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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April 1979
Volume 33, Number 4

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Consumer responses to nutrition claims in food advertisements
by Helene Swenerton, Joyce A. Vermeersch
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Data obtained from interviews with women from varying socioeconomic levels indicate that nutrition claims in ads do not attract attention as do colorful layout, appetizing food, or familiar people; that nutrition claims create a more favorable impression of a product; and that, depending on certain variables among respondents, knowledge of nutrition terms is often poor.
Nutrition claims in magazine ads are not as potent attention-getting devices as other factors but create a more favorable impression for many consumers.
Fungicides for control of chrysanthemum rust
by Arthur H. McCain, Karen Gonot
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Because some of the newer, more effective rust fungicides had not been evaluated for control of rust of chrysanthemum, a study was undertaken to identify which chemicals are most effective against the disease. Zineb and chlorothalonil provided excellent control when sprayed before infection; oxycarboxin, applied through drip or tube irrigation systems, provided excellent control with less worker exposure and no visible residue.
Growth retardants mitigate Verticillium wilt and increase yield of cotton
by Donald C. Erwin, Sing-dao Tsai, Rudolph A. Khan
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Specific quantities of certain growth retardants, when applied foliarly in June or July, had a slight mitigating effect on symptoms of Verticillium wilt of cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae and increased yield of cotton 10 to 29 percent, whether it was grown on land infested by V. duhliue or not.
Disease severity of Verticillium wilt was only slightly reduced by the nonfungitoxic compounds—but yield increased between 10 and 29 percent.
Plant uptake of bromide following soil fumigation with methyl bromide
by A. Lloyd Brown, Richard G. Burau, Roland D. Meyer, Dewey J. Raski, Stephen Wilhelm, James Quick
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Plants grown on soils that have been fumigated with methyl bromide usually show increased bromide concentrations. While there is a potential health hazard involved, particularly where animals consume the forage grown, this can be minimized by choice of crop and by monitoring the accumulation of bromide by plants.
The highest concentrations in plants grown on soils that have been fumigated with methyl bromide occur during the first year following fumigation.
Ozone-pesticide interactions
by Roberto R. Teso, Ronald J. Oshima, M. Ingrid Carmean
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In tests conducted to determine the effects of ozone and pesticides acting together on foliage, methomyl and ozone interacted to produce greater injury than that produced by the sum of the two applied separately, whereas diazinon and ozone interacted to produce an antagonistic response (less injury than when applied separately). These complex interactions, and the varying effects of different amounts of the substances, suggest the need for future research.
Pesticides that interact to produce less damage may be of great value in minimizing air pollution losses and should be incorporated into pest management systems where there is significant air pollution.

News and opinion

Human nutrition research needs a leader
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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