California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

March 1979
Volume 33, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

California grapes: The situation in 1979
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Optimism exists about future industry growth, but there is much uncertainty facing growers and vintners. The wide range of a “reasonable” crush projection for 1982 demonstrates this lack of predictability.
Heat stress survey
by James C. Oliver, Howard M. Hellman, Shirl E. Bishop, C. L. Pelissier, Loren F. Bennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Shades are more effective in reducing milk production and cattle losses than any other devices studied under severe high humidity and heat conditions. This suggests that shades might help maintain maximum milk production under normal summer conditions.
The cattle and milk-production losses caused by tropical storm Doreen enabled dairymen to evaluate the effectiveness of various heat-stress-reducing devices.
Effects of fumigating crops with hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide
by C. Ray Thompson, Gerrit Kats, Robert W. Lennox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varying amounts of H2S and SO2 caused varying effects on lettuce, sugarbeets, cotton, and alfalfa—from increasing fresh weight to causing severely reduced growth. The addition of CO2 to high concentrations of fumigants overcame growth depression.
Adding CO2 to emissions from geothermal energy sources can prevent plant injury and even increase plant growth rate.
Controlling powdery mildew in greenhouse roses
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Sodomka, Seward Besemer, Jerry Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In an evaluation of several new fungicides effective against powdery mildews, Sisthane and CG 6451 proved to be most effective in treating greenhouse roses.
Stem lesion of Easter lilies—a complex disease
by John Bald, John Lenz, Albert O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Whereas Psudomonas by itself is unlikely to act as a serious pathogen on lily stems, when it is recovered with Fusarium severe stem lesions are often present. The search for an effective bactericidal dip for lily bulbs continues.
Selenium improves weight gain of beef calves
by Walter H. Johnson, Ben B. Norman, John R. Dunbar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although the effects of weight loss from selenium-deficient cattle is less dramatic than death caused by white muscle disease (also resulting from selenium deficiency), the economic loss can be severe. Treatments with injections of selenium have produced significant weight-gain increases in selenium-deficient areas.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Publicly funded agricultural research—an anachronism or a challenge?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=33_3

March 1979
Volume 33, Number 3

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

California grapes: The situation in 1979
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Optimism exists about future industry growth, but there is much uncertainty facing growers and vintners. The wide range of a “reasonable” crush projection for 1982 demonstrates this lack of predictability.
Heat stress survey
by James C. Oliver, Howard M. Hellman, Shirl E. Bishop, C. L. Pelissier, Loren F. Bennett
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Shades are more effective in reducing milk production and cattle losses than any other devices studied under severe high humidity and heat conditions. This suggests that shades might help maintain maximum milk production under normal summer conditions.
The cattle and milk-production losses caused by tropical storm Doreen enabled dairymen to evaluate the effectiveness of various heat-stress-reducing devices.
Effects of fumigating crops with hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide
by C. Ray Thompson, Gerrit Kats, Robert W. Lennox
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Varying amounts of H2S and SO2 caused varying effects on lettuce, sugarbeets, cotton, and alfalfa—from increasing fresh weight to causing severely reduced growth. The addition of CO2 to high concentrations of fumigants overcame growth depression.
Adding CO2 to emissions from geothermal energy sources can prevent plant injury and even increase plant growth rate.
Controlling powdery mildew in greenhouse roses
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Sodomka, Seward Besemer, Jerry Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In an evaluation of several new fungicides effective against powdery mildews, Sisthane and CG 6451 proved to be most effective in treating greenhouse roses.
Stem lesion of Easter lilies—a complex disease
by John Bald, John Lenz, Albert O. Paulus
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Whereas Psudomonas by itself is unlikely to act as a serious pathogen on lily stems, when it is recovered with Fusarium severe stem lesions are often present. The search for an effective bactericidal dip for lily bulbs continues.
Selenium improves weight gain of beef calves
by Walter H. Johnson, Ben B. Norman, John R. Dunbar
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Although the effects of weight loss from selenium-deficient cattle is less dramatic than death caused by white muscle disease (also resulting from selenium deficiency), the economic loss can be severe. Treatments with injections of selenium have produced significant weight-gain increases in selenium-deficient areas.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Publicly funded agricultural research—an anachronism or a challenge?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/