California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

September 1978
Volume 32, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Siskiyou—a triticale variety for northern California
by Calvin O. Qualset, Herbert E. Vogt, J. Perry Gustafson, Frank J. Zillinsky, John D. Prato, Kenyon D. Beatty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The first public triticale variety to be released in the United States, Siskiyou, has high grain protein and lysine content and high yield with spring planting in the Tulelake region.
Biological control of root-knot nematode on peach
by Graham R. Stirling, Michael V. McKenry, Ron Mankau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control of root-knot nematodes in peach orchards on Lovell rootstock is one of the first examples of biological control of a plant-parasitic nematode in the field by a naturally occurring antagonist.A naturally occurring, new fungus, Dactylella OviparaStica, has been found parasitizing root-knot nematode eggs in San Joaquin Valley peach orchards grown on Love11 peach rootstock where the nematode pest has been suppressed.
Vacuum and flow characteristics of milking machine claws
by Keith R. Goff, Robert O. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Claws were not consistently different in their milking characteristics based on claw volume. Vacuum for teat-end massage may not be adequate at milking speeds of 15 pounds per minute and above.
Cubing increases density of kenaf
by Dennis J. DaVia, Marvin O. Bagby, Buren A. Wolf, Paulden F. Knowles, John R. Goss
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Kenaf is useful not only as a fiber source for rope, twine, and cloth, but also as a supplemental fiber source for paper. Difficulties caused by its high bulk content can be overcome by using alfalfa-cubing methods which compress the kenaf for easier storage and transportation.
A new look at curly top disease
by Andrew C. Magyarosy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite rangeland spraying, use of systemic insecticides at planting of sugarbeets, new cultural methods, and resistant sugarbeet varieties, curly top continues to take its annual economic toll.Despite years of research to develop better methods of prevention and control, curly top disease continues to take a high economic toll in tomato and sugarbeet industries.
Save money—apply trace elements only as needed
by David Ririe, Keith S. Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Insurance-type applications of trace elements are a wasteful and unnecessary practice in the Salinas and Imperial valleys.Research in the Salinas and Imperial valleys of California shows that crop response to trace elements is so rare that insurance applications are unnecessary in those areas.
Domestic fly problems in deep pit poultry houses
by Lorry L. Dunning, Edmond C. Loomis, W. Stanley Coates, Fred C. Price
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A complex predator population inside a good fly-tight house—coupled with careful manure and water management—can control flies in high-rise poultry houses.Deep-pit poultry houses can be odor and fly free if managed properly. House design and fan placement for proper air movement have the greatest influence on domestic fly production, according to this study.

News and opinion

The competitive grant concept on trial
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Research in progress
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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September 1978
Volume 32, Number 9

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

Siskiyou—a triticale variety for northern California
by Calvin O. Qualset, Herbert E. Vogt, J. Perry Gustafson, Frank J. Zillinsky, John D. Prato, Kenyon D. Beatty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The first public triticale variety to be released in the United States, Siskiyou, has high grain protein and lysine content and high yield with spring planting in the Tulelake region.
Biological control of root-knot nematode on peach
by Graham R. Stirling, Michael V. McKenry, Ron Mankau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Control of root-knot nematodes in peach orchards on Lovell rootstock is one of the first examples of biological control of a plant-parasitic nematode in the field by a naturally occurring antagonist.A naturally occurring, new fungus, Dactylella OviparaStica, has been found parasitizing root-knot nematode eggs in San Joaquin Valley peach orchards grown on Love11 peach rootstock where the nematode pest has been suppressed.
Vacuum and flow characteristics of milking machine claws
by Keith R. Goff, Robert O. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Claws were not consistently different in their milking characteristics based on claw volume. Vacuum for teat-end massage may not be adequate at milking speeds of 15 pounds per minute and above.
Cubing increases density of kenaf
by Dennis J. DaVia, Marvin O. Bagby, Buren A. Wolf, Paulden F. Knowles, John R. Goss
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Kenaf is useful not only as a fiber source for rope, twine, and cloth, but also as a supplemental fiber source for paper. Difficulties caused by its high bulk content can be overcome by using alfalfa-cubing methods which compress the kenaf for easier storage and transportation.
A new look at curly top disease
by Andrew C. Magyarosy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Despite rangeland spraying, use of systemic insecticides at planting of sugarbeets, new cultural methods, and resistant sugarbeet varieties, curly top continues to take its annual economic toll.Despite years of research to develop better methods of prevention and control, curly top disease continues to take a high economic toll in tomato and sugarbeet industries.
Save money—apply trace elements only as needed
by David Ririe, Keith S. Mayberry
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Insurance-type applications of trace elements are a wasteful and unnecessary practice in the Salinas and Imperial valleys.Research in the Salinas and Imperial valleys of California shows that crop response to trace elements is so rare that insurance applications are unnecessary in those areas.
Domestic fly problems in deep pit poultry houses
by Lorry L. Dunning, Edmond C. Loomis, W. Stanley Coates, Fred C. Price
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
A complex predator population inside a good fly-tight house—coupled with careful manure and water management—can control flies in high-rise poultry houses.Deep-pit poultry houses can be odor and fly free if managed properly. House design and fan placement for proper air movement have the greatest influence on domestic fly production, according to this study.

News and opinion

The competitive grant concept on trial
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Research in progress
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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