California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

Archive

December 1977
Volume 31, Number 12

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

4-H community pride program
by Lynne P. Kaplan, James Grieshop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The program involves youths from 9 to 19 years of age in projects that encourage involvement with adults in community planning and decision making.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the urban area of Fresno, a group of youth campaign to make public transportation more widely available in their community.
A newly imported California red scale parasite from Saudi Arabia
by Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
After a long search involving taxonomic studies as well as foreign exploration, a species of Apkytis was imported from Saudi Arabia which may be a significant natural enemy of California red scale.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In general, species of Aphytis are the most effective of California red scale parasites. Species of Comperiella, Prospaltella, Physcus, Aspidiotiphagus and Habrolepis are usually less effective but may act in a complementary manner. Several species of Aphytis are recorded to be partially to completely effective in biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell), in various citrus producing countries. Aphytis melinus DeBach, originally from India and Pakistan, is now established in California, Argentina, Australia, Greece, Israel, Cyprus, South Africa, and elsewhere. Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, originally from southeast China, is now in California, Mexico, Texas, and elsewhere. Aphytis coheni Debach is important in Israel; A. chrysomphali (Mercet) has been of some consequence in California, Australia, Greece, Israel, and elsewhere; and A. africanus Quedneau is considered important in South Africa.
Aphid control on chrysanthemums and carnations
by Ronald D. Oetting, Frank S. Morishita, Roland N. Jefferson, Wesley A. Humphrey, Seward T. Besemer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In three experiments, Primor and Orthene gave effective and long-lasting aphid control. No phytotoxicity was observed, except on two Hurricane varieties of chrysanthemum sprayed with Furadan.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Aphids commonly occur as pests on chrysanthemums and carnations as well as on many other plants grown in plastic or glass houses in California. They are usually found in colonies on plant tips, shoots of new growth, or flowers. Aphids multiply so rapidly under favorable conditions that a light infestation may increase to alarming proportions in a week. They are generally more numerous during cooler months when the most serious damage occurs. However, damage can be observed throughout the year.
Downy mildew of lettuce controlled by systemic fungicide
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Marvin Snyder, Judy Gafney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In two trials, new Ciba Geigy systemic fungicides gave excellent commercial control of lettuce downy mildew. Control was better than that obtained with commonly used materials.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Downy mildew of lettuce, caused by the fungus Bremia lactucae, can cause considerable damage especially to early spring and late fall crops in coastal areas. It is favored by cool, moist weather and may occasionally cause economic damage in the Imperial Valley during the winter lettuce season. Trials were initiated in the summer and fall of 1976 to compare new systemic fungicides from Ciba Geigy with commonly used materials.
Research aids christmas tree industry
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University work helps a growth industry in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production and marketing of Christmas trees in California can be described as a “growth” industry in more ways than one.
Survival of potato-blackleg and soft-rot bacteria
by Thomas J. Burr, Milton N. Schroth, David N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It has been shown that these bacteria can survive in the root zones of many weeds and crop plants. Blackleg-free seed programs, control of weeds, and good sanitation can help control the bacteria.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Potato blackleg and soft-rot of tubers, caused by Erwinici carotovora var. carotovora and E. carotovora var. atroseptica, respectively, continue to cause mild to severe field, shipping, and storage losses of potatoes in California. An understanding of the survival capabilities of the bacteria and the factors that contribute to their spread is essential for the development of effective controls for these diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that (1) the bacteria are seed-borne, and (2) they overwinter in the lenticels and stem-end portions of the seed tubers. Whether the bacteria can survive in soil, however, has been much more controversial, primarily because of the lack of sensitive techniques for detecting bacteria populations below 1000 cells/g of soil.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Are we listening?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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December 1977
Volume 31, Number 12

Peer-reviewed research and review articles

4-H community pride program
by Lynne P. Kaplan, James Grieshop
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
The program involves youths from 9 to 19 years of age in projects that encourage involvement with adults in community planning and decision making.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the urban area of Fresno, a group of youth campaign to make public transportation more widely available in their community.
A newly imported California red scale parasite from Saudi Arabia
by Paul DeBach
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
After a long search involving taxonomic studies as well as foreign exploration, a species of Apkytis was imported from Saudi Arabia which may be a significant natural enemy of California red scale.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In general, species of Aphytis are the most effective of California red scale parasites. Species of Comperiella, Prospaltella, Physcus, Aspidiotiphagus and Habrolepis are usually less effective but may act in a complementary manner. Several species of Aphytis are recorded to be partially to completely effective in biological control of the California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell), in various citrus producing countries. Aphytis melinus DeBach, originally from India and Pakistan, is now established in California, Argentina, Australia, Greece, Israel, Cyprus, South Africa, and elsewhere. Aphytis lingnanensis Compere, originally from southeast China, is now in California, Mexico, Texas, and elsewhere. Aphytis coheni Debach is important in Israel; A. chrysomphali (Mercet) has been of some consequence in California, Australia, Greece, Israel, and elsewhere; and A. africanus Quedneau is considered important in South Africa.
Aphid control on chrysanthemums and carnations
by Ronald D. Oetting, Frank S. Morishita, Roland N. Jefferson, Wesley A. Humphrey, Seward T. Besemer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In three experiments, Primor and Orthene gave effective and long-lasting aphid control. No phytotoxicity was observed, except on two Hurricane varieties of chrysanthemum sprayed with Furadan.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Aphids commonly occur as pests on chrysanthemums and carnations as well as on many other plants grown in plastic or glass houses in California. They are usually found in colonies on plant tips, shoots of new growth, or flowers. Aphids multiply so rapidly under favorable conditions that a light infestation may increase to alarming proportions in a week. They are generally more numerous during cooler months when the most serious damage occurs. However, damage can be observed throughout the year.
Downy mildew of lettuce controlled by systemic fungicide
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry Nelson, Marvin Snyder, Judy Gafney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
In two trials, new Ciba Geigy systemic fungicides gave excellent commercial control of lettuce downy mildew. Control was better than that obtained with commonly used materials.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Downy mildew of lettuce, caused by the fungus Bremia lactucae, can cause considerable damage especially to early spring and late fall crops in coastal areas. It is favored by cool, moist weather and may occasionally cause economic damage in the Imperial Valley during the winter lettuce season. Trials were initiated in the summer and fall of 1976 to compare new systemic fungicides from Ciba Geigy with commonly used materials.
Research aids christmas tree industry
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
University work helps a growth industry in California.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The production and marketing of Christmas trees in California can be described as a “growth” industry in more ways than one.
Survival of potato-blackleg and soft-rot bacteria
by Thomas J. Burr, Milton N. Schroth, David N. Wright
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
It has been shown that these bacteria can survive in the root zones of many weeds and crop plants. Blackleg-free seed programs, control of weeds, and good sanitation can help control the bacteria.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Potato blackleg and soft-rot of tubers, caused by Erwinici carotovora var. carotovora and E. carotovora var. atroseptica, respectively, continue to cause mild to severe field, shipping, and storage losses of potatoes in California. An understanding of the survival capabilities of the bacteria and the factors that contribute to their spread is essential for the development of effective controls for these diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that (1) the bacteria are seed-borne, and (2) they overwinter in the lenticels and stem-end portions of the seed tubers. Whether the bacteria can survive in soil, however, has been much more controversial, primarily because of the lack of sensitive techniques for detecting bacteria populations below 1000 cells/g of soil.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Are we listening?
by J. B. Kendrick
Full text HTML  | PDF  

General Information

Index
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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