California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

October 1976
Volume 30, Number 10

Research articles

A new crop for California: Kiwifruit
by James A. Beutel, Frank H. Winter, Spencer C. Manners, Martin W. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis planch), a native of south central China, grows on a large, woody, deciduous vine. In 1906 it was introduced into New Zealand under the name of “Chinese gooseberry,” and during the next quarter century New Zealand nurserymen selected large-fruited seedlings, which became commercial varieties. When New Zealand first began to export the fruits commercially in 1953, the name was changed to “kiwi,” because the fruits superficially resemble New Zealand's native bird, the kiwi.
Studies show that kiwifruit can be successfully canned, but that frozen, sliced kiwifruits are closest to fresh fruit in appearance and flavor.
Developing the sea's resources: Marine advisory program
by Gary A. Beall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small outboard motor boat breaks the early morning silence as it slips into Elkhorn slough near the coastal community of Moss landing. It's only 6 a.m., but for tom Thompson the day is well under way. He is helping gradute student dave streig pull gill nets placed in the slough the previous evening to catch loapard sharks.
Sometimes referred to as farm advisors in hip boots, University marine advisors devote their time to educational and applied research programs dealing with the development and use of marine resources.
Redworms don't control, may spread avocado root rot
by Howard D. Ohr, George A. Zentmyer, Laura Klure, Fred Guillemet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The increased interest in redworms and their use as biological agents for several purposes has led to inquiries, by avocado growers and redworm industry representatives, about the worm's effectiveness in controlling avocado root rot caused by Phytophthom cinnamomi. At the request of the redworm industry, we initiated a greenhouse experiment to determine if the worms had any effectiveness in reducing root rot on avocados.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The increased interest in redworms and their use as biological agents for several purposes has led to inquiries, by avocado growers and redworm industry representatives, about the worm's effectiveness in controlling avocado root rot caused by Phytophthom cinnamomi. At the request of the redworm industry, we initiated a greenhouse experiment to determine if the worms had any effectiveness in reducing root rot on avocados.
Treating cotton seed cuts losses to damping-off
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry A. Nelson, Fujio Shibuya, Richard H. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Damping-off of cotton seedling, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia soluni, can be a serious seedling disease in the interior valleys of southern California. Pythium spp. may cause some seed rot and seedling decline. Trials in previous years indicated combination treatments of two fungicides were superior to single fungicides for control. Trials were initiated in 1973 to compare new fungicide materials and combinations of older materials.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Damping-off of cotton seedling, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia soluni, can be a serious seedling disease in the interior valleys of southern California. Pythium spp. may cause some seed rot and seedling decline. Trials in previous years indicated combination treatments of two fungicides were superior to single fungicides for control. Trials were initiated in 1973 to compare new fungicide materials and combinations of older materials.
Powdery mildew of sugar beet-here to stay?
by F. Jack Hills, Dennis H. Hall, Lysle D. Leach, Carol A. Frate, Robert T. Lewellen, Luigi Chiarappa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew disease of suger beet has been known for many years in Europe and the Middle East, but it was seldom seen in California before 1974. The sudden and widespread occurrence of the disease in 1974 throughout the western United States is difficult to explain but probably was due to the introduction or development of a virulent race of the pathogen in or near the Imperial Valley, from where it rapidly spread by windblown spores to other areas. The continued presence of the disease in all areas in 1975 and 1976 indicates that a pathogenic race of this fungus disease is here to stay.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew disease of suger beet has been known for many years in Europe and the Middle East, but it was seldom seen in California before 1974. The sudden and widespread occurrence of the disease in 1974 throughout the western United States is difficult to explain but probably was due to the introduction or development of a virulent race of the pathogen in or near the Imperial Valley, from where it rapidly spread by windblown spores to other areas. The continued presence of the disease in all areas in 1975 and 1976 indicates that a pathogenic race of this fungus disease is here to stay.
Wheat varieties susceptible to powdery mildew
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the last few years emphasis has been placed on wheat production in the Imperial Valley. In 1975-76 about 115,000 acres were planted to lurum and another 35,000 acres to “bread” wheat.
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the last few years emphasis has been placed on wheat production in the Imperial Valley. In 1975-76 about 115,000 acres were planted to lurum and another 35,000 acres to “bread” wheat.
Control of hardwoods improves douglas-fir growth
by Steven R. Radosevich, Peter C. Passof, Oliver A. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cut-surface applications of herbicides provide satisfactory control of tanoak and madrone, eliminating competition with Douglas-fir.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Evergreen broadleaf trees, such as tanoak (lithocarpus densiflorus [Hook & Arn] Rehd.) and madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pers.), infest almost a million acres, or 25 percent, of potentially productive redwood/Douglas-fir timber acreage in northern California and southwestern Oregon. The cut-surface method of injecting herbicides into the vascular systems of such undesirable tree species is an effective means of control. Recent interest in this method of hardwood tree control in forests can be attributed to several factors. One is the relatively poor long-term control of resprouting species provided by herbicide applications from aircraft. Another is that the cut-surface method increases selectivity; the user can treat only the trees he wishes to control, such as those of one species or size, leaving desirable trees. Cut-surface applications also confine the herbicide to the treated tree.
Truebugs… Consperse stink bug/Western boxelder bug
by William W. Barnett, Gordon W. Morehead, Clarence S. Davis, Johannes L. Joos, Bruce E. Bearden, Clarence S. Davis, Arthur Berlowitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Consperse stink bug feeding on the fruit causes sunken areas or dimples on the surface under which white corky areas form in the flesh. (See fig. 1 and 2.) The bug usually feeds near the stem end, although it may attack other parts of the fruit. While feeding, the adult bug often leaves small, dark blotches of excrement on fruit and leaves.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Consperse stink bug feeding on the fruit causes sunken areas or dimples on the surface under which white corky areas form in the flesh. (See fig. 1 and 2.) The bug usually feeds near the stem end, although it may attack other parts of the fruit. While feeding, the adult bug often leaves small, dark blotches of excrement on fruit and leaves.

General Information

Citrus program provides disease-free trees
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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October 1976
Volume 30, Number 10

Research articles

A new crop for California: Kiwifruit
by James A. Beutel, Frank H. Winter, Spencer C. Manners, Martin W. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis planch), a native of south central China, grows on a large, woody, deciduous vine. In 1906 it was introduced into New Zealand under the name of “Chinese gooseberry,” and during the next quarter century New Zealand nurserymen selected large-fruited seedlings, which became commercial varieties. When New Zealand first began to export the fruits commercially in 1953, the name was changed to “kiwi,” because the fruits superficially resemble New Zealand's native bird, the kiwi.
Studies show that kiwifruit can be successfully canned, but that frozen, sliced kiwifruits are closest to fresh fruit in appearance and flavor.
Developing the sea's resources: Marine advisory program
by Gary A. Beall
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A small outboard motor boat breaks the early morning silence as it slips into Elkhorn slough near the coastal community of Moss landing. It's only 6 a.m., but for tom Thompson the day is well under way. He is helping gradute student dave streig pull gill nets placed in the slough the previous evening to catch loapard sharks.
Sometimes referred to as farm advisors in hip boots, University marine advisors devote their time to educational and applied research programs dealing with the development and use of marine resources.
Redworms don't control, may spread avocado root rot
by Howard D. Ohr, George A. Zentmyer, Laura Klure, Fred Guillemet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The increased interest in redworms and their use as biological agents for several purposes has led to inquiries, by avocado growers and redworm industry representatives, about the worm's effectiveness in controlling avocado root rot caused by Phytophthom cinnamomi. At the request of the redworm industry, we initiated a greenhouse experiment to determine if the worms had any effectiveness in reducing root rot on avocados.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The increased interest in redworms and their use as biological agents for several purposes has led to inquiries, by avocado growers and redworm industry representatives, about the worm's effectiveness in controlling avocado root rot caused by Phytophthom cinnamomi. At the request of the redworm industry, we initiated a greenhouse experiment to determine if the worms had any effectiveness in reducing root rot on avocados.
Treating cotton seed cuts losses to damping-off
by Albert O. Paulus, Jerry A. Nelson, Fujio Shibuya, Richard H. Garber
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Damping-off of cotton seedling, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia soluni, can be a serious seedling disease in the interior valleys of southern California. Pythium spp. may cause some seed rot and seedling decline. Trials in previous years indicated combination treatments of two fungicides were superior to single fungicides for control. Trials were initiated in 1973 to compare new fungicide materials and combinations of older materials.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Damping-off of cotton seedling, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia soluni, can be a serious seedling disease in the interior valleys of southern California. Pythium spp. may cause some seed rot and seedling decline. Trials in previous years indicated combination treatments of two fungicides were superior to single fungicides for control. Trials were initiated in 1973 to compare new fungicide materials and combinations of older materials.
Powdery mildew of sugar beet-here to stay?
by F. Jack Hills, Dennis H. Hall, Lysle D. Leach, Carol A. Frate, Robert T. Lewellen, Luigi Chiarappa
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew disease of suger beet has been known for many years in Europe and the Middle East, but it was seldom seen in California before 1974. The sudden and widespread occurrence of the disease in 1974 throughout the western United States is difficult to explain but probably was due to the introduction or development of a virulent race of the pathogen in or near the Imperial Valley, from where it rapidly spread by windblown spores to other areas. The continued presence of the disease in all areas in 1975 and 1976 indicates that a pathogenic race of this fungus disease is here to stay.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew disease of suger beet has been known for many years in Europe and the Middle East, but it was seldom seen in California before 1974. The sudden and widespread occurrence of the disease in 1974 throughout the western United States is difficult to explain but probably was due to the introduction or development of a virulent race of the pathogen in or near the Imperial Valley, from where it rapidly spread by windblown spores to other areas. The continued presence of the disease in all areas in 1975 and 1976 indicates that a pathogenic race of this fungus disease is here to stay.
Wheat varieties susceptible to powdery mildew
by Demetrios G. Kontaxis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the last few years emphasis has been placed on wheat production in the Imperial Valley. In 1975-76 about 115,000 acres were planted to lurum and another 35,000 acres to “bread” wheat.
Not available – first paragraph follows: During the last few years emphasis has been placed on wheat production in the Imperial Valley. In 1975-76 about 115,000 acres were planted to lurum and another 35,000 acres to “bread” wheat.
Control of hardwoods improves douglas-fir growth
by Steven R. Radosevich, Peter C. Passof, Oliver A. Leonard
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Cut-surface applications of herbicides provide satisfactory control of tanoak and madrone, eliminating competition with Douglas-fir.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Evergreen broadleaf trees, such as tanoak (lithocarpus densiflorus [Hook & Arn] Rehd.) and madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pers.), infest almost a million acres, or 25 percent, of potentially productive redwood/Douglas-fir timber acreage in northern California and southwestern Oregon. The cut-surface method of injecting herbicides into the vascular systems of such undesirable tree species is an effective means of control. Recent interest in this method of hardwood tree control in forests can be attributed to several factors. One is the relatively poor long-term control of resprouting species provided by herbicide applications from aircraft. Another is that the cut-surface method increases selectivity; the user can treat only the trees he wishes to control, such as those of one species or size, leaving desirable trees. Cut-surface applications also confine the herbicide to the treated tree.
Truebugs… Consperse stink bug/Western boxelder bug
by William W. Barnett, Gordon W. Morehead, Clarence S. Davis, Johannes L. Joos, Bruce E. Bearden, Clarence S. Davis, Arthur Berlowitz
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Consperse stink bug feeding on the fruit causes sunken areas or dimples on the surface under which white corky areas form in the flesh. (See fig. 1 and 2.) The bug usually feeds near the stem end, although it may attack other parts of the fruit. While feeding, the adult bug often leaves small, dark blotches of excrement on fruit and leaves.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Consperse stink bug feeding on the fruit causes sunken areas or dimples on the surface under which white corky areas form in the flesh. (See fig. 1 and 2.) The bug usually feeds near the stem end, although it may attack other parts of the fruit. While feeding, the adult bug often leaves small, dark blotches of excrement on fruit and leaves.

General Information

Citrus program provides disease-free trees
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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