California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.5

Tests for cooling cattle in hot weather
May 1948
Volume 2, Number 5

Research articles

Improved sugar beet harvester: Gives high quality performance but more development required
by John B. Powers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A sugar beet harvester developed at Davis and tested in dry, peat-loam soil at Clarksburg, October 16, 1947, gave 93.7% root recovery and only 6.8% dirt pickup.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A sugar beet harvester developed at Davis and tested in dry, peat-loam soil at Clarksburg, October 16, 1947, gave 93.7% root recovery and only 6.8% dirt pickup.
Feed sources surveyed: Available pasturage and hay located by counties in western states
by B. H. Crocheron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In March, California livestock men faced possible loss of even their breeding herds and flocks through drouth-forced sales to the butcher or to producers in more favorable feeding areas. Through representatives of three of their associations they asked the Agricultural Extension Service for data on available livestock feed.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In March, California livestock men faced possible loss of even their breeding herds and flocks through drouth-forced sales to the butcher or to producers in more favorable feeding areas. Through representatives of three of their associations they asked the Agricultural Extension Service for data on available livestock feed.
Artificial shades for livestock
by N. R. Ittner, C. F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following is a progress report of a coiiperative study of the environmental factors influencing the development, production and health of animals in warm climates which was initiated in 1946 by the University of California, College of Agriculture and the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. The study is underway at the Meloland Field Station in the Imperial Valley.
Following is a progress report of a coiiperative study of the environmental factors influencing the development, production and health of animals in warm climates which was initiated in 1946 by the University of California, College of Agriculture and the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. The study is underway at the Meloland Field Station in the Imperial Valley.
Effect of molybdenum: On livestock in permanent pastures
by H. S. Cameron, H. Goss
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The development of permanent pasture in certain areas of the state has been accompanied by a somewhat obscure disease affecting the young stock grazing on pastures, “up to the hocks in feed, but starving to death.” Based on investigational work in England on a comparable condition there is a probability that the element molybdenum may be an important factor in causing the disease.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The development of permanent pasture in certain areas of the state has been accompanied by a somewhat obscure disease affecting the young stock grazing on pastures, “up to the hocks in feed, but starving to death.” Based on investigational work in England on a comparable condition there is a probability that the element molybdenum may be an important factor in causing the disease.
Fruit sizes of prunes: As influenced by differences in set and irrigation treatment
by A. H. Hendrickson, F. J. Veihmeyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prunes are an excellent subject for studies on the relations between controlled soil-moisture conditions and sizes of fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prunes are an excellent subject for studies on the relations between controlled soil-moisture conditions and sizes of fruit.
Water for field and truck crops
by L. D. Doneen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For additional information concerning irrigation and water requirements of crops consult your local farm advisor.
For additional information concerning irrigation and water requirements of crops consult your local farm advisor.
Upgrading prune orchards: By propagating with cuttings
by H. A. Weinland
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rootstocks made from cuttings, rather than propagated by seed, are coming into favor with many growers in Sonoma County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rootstocks made from cuttings, rather than propagated by seed, are coming into favor with many growers in Sonoma County.
Klamath weed: Imported beetles promising as part of general control program
by C. B. Huffaker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The principal hazard of Klamath weed is its displacement of desirable forage plants, though much has been said concerning its moderate toxic effects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The principal hazard of Klamath weed is its displacement of desirable forage plants, though much has been said concerning its moderate toxic effects.
Sheep production: Program recommended
by R. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sheep form an important part of California agriculture. Thousands of acres of the state's grazing land can be utilized best by sheep. Since sheep fit well into grain farming rotation to restore soil fertility, they can be used profitably on the worn out grain land which has been over-farmed in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sheep form an important part of California agriculture. Thousands of acres of the state's grazing land can be utilized best by sheep. Since sheep fit well into grain farming rotation to restore soil fertility, they can be used profitably on the worn out grain land which has been over-farmed in California.
Yields of wheat or barley: On root-rot infested soils may be increased by rotation with oats or rye
by Coit A. Suneson, John W. Oswald
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The root-rotting fungus—Ophiobolus graminis—thrives on' wheat and barley but not on oats or rye.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The root-rotting fungus—Ophiobolus graminis—thrives on' wheat and barley but not on oats or rye.
Atlas 46 a new barley: Resistant to powdery mildew and to scald
by Charles W. Schaller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Atlas 46 mentioned in the above article was developed by F. N. Briggs, Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist in the Experiment Station, Davis, and o.C. Riddle, then Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Davis.
Atlas 46 mentioned in the above article was developed by F. N. Briggs, Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist in the Experiment Station, Davis, and o.C. Riddle, then Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Davis.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 2, No.5

Tests for cooling cattle in hot weather
May 1948
Volume 2, Number 5

Research articles

Improved sugar beet harvester: Gives high quality performance but more development required
by John B. Powers
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: A sugar beet harvester developed at Davis and tested in dry, peat-loam soil at Clarksburg, October 16, 1947, gave 93.7% root recovery and only 6.8% dirt pickup.
Not available – first paragraph follows: A sugar beet harvester developed at Davis and tested in dry, peat-loam soil at Clarksburg, October 16, 1947, gave 93.7% root recovery and only 6.8% dirt pickup.
Feed sources surveyed: Available pasturage and hay located by counties in western states
by B. H. Crocheron
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In March, California livestock men faced possible loss of even their breeding herds and flocks through drouth-forced sales to the butcher or to producers in more favorable feeding areas. Through representatives of three of their associations they asked the Agricultural Extension Service for data on available livestock feed.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In March, California livestock men faced possible loss of even their breeding herds and flocks through drouth-forced sales to the butcher or to producers in more favorable feeding areas. Through representatives of three of their associations they asked the Agricultural Extension Service for data on available livestock feed.
Artificial shades for livestock
by N. R. Ittner, C. F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Following is a progress report of a coiiperative study of the environmental factors influencing the development, production and health of animals in warm climates which was initiated in 1946 by the University of California, College of Agriculture and the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. The study is underway at the Meloland Field Station in the Imperial Valley.
Following is a progress report of a coiiperative study of the environmental factors influencing the development, production and health of animals in warm climates which was initiated in 1946 by the University of California, College of Agriculture and the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. The study is underway at the Meloland Field Station in the Imperial Valley.
Effect of molybdenum: On livestock in permanent pastures
by H. S. Cameron, H. Goss
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The development of permanent pasture in certain areas of the state has been accompanied by a somewhat obscure disease affecting the young stock grazing on pastures, “up to the hocks in feed, but starving to death.” Based on investigational work in England on a comparable condition there is a probability that the element molybdenum may be an important factor in causing the disease.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The development of permanent pasture in certain areas of the state has been accompanied by a somewhat obscure disease affecting the young stock grazing on pastures, “up to the hocks in feed, but starving to death.” Based on investigational work in England on a comparable condition there is a probability that the element molybdenum may be an important factor in causing the disease.
Fruit sizes of prunes: As influenced by differences in set and irrigation treatment
by A. H. Hendrickson, F. J. Veihmeyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prunes are an excellent subject for studies on the relations between controlled soil-moisture conditions and sizes of fruit.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Prunes are an excellent subject for studies on the relations between controlled soil-moisture conditions and sizes of fruit.
Water for field and truck crops
by L. D. Doneen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: For additional information concerning irrigation and water requirements of crops consult your local farm advisor.
For additional information concerning irrigation and water requirements of crops consult your local farm advisor.
Upgrading prune orchards: By propagating with cuttings
by H. A. Weinland
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rootstocks made from cuttings, rather than propagated by seed, are coming into favor with many growers in Sonoma County.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Rootstocks made from cuttings, rather than propagated by seed, are coming into favor with many growers in Sonoma County.
Klamath weed: Imported beetles promising as part of general control program
by C. B. Huffaker
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The principal hazard of Klamath weed is its displacement of desirable forage plants, though much has been said concerning its moderate toxic effects.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The principal hazard of Klamath weed is its displacement of desirable forage plants, though much has been said concerning its moderate toxic effects.
Sheep production: Program recommended
by R. F. Miller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sheep form an important part of California agriculture. Thousands of acres of the state's grazing land can be utilized best by sheep. Since sheep fit well into grain farming rotation to restore soil fertility, they can be used profitably on the worn out grain land which has been over-farmed in California.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Sheep form an important part of California agriculture. Thousands of acres of the state's grazing land can be utilized best by sheep. Since sheep fit well into grain farming rotation to restore soil fertility, they can be used profitably on the worn out grain land which has been over-farmed in California.
Yields of wheat or barley: On root-rot infested soils may be increased by rotation with oats or rye
by Coit A. Suneson, John W. Oswald
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The root-rotting fungus—Ophiobolus graminis—thrives on' wheat and barley but not on oats or rye.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The root-rotting fungus—Ophiobolus graminis—thrives on' wheat and barley but not on oats or rye.
Atlas 46 a new barley: Resistant to powdery mildew and to scald
by Charles W. Schaller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Atlas 46 mentioned in the above article was developed by F. N. Briggs, Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist in the Experiment Station, Davis, and o.C. Riddle, then Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Davis.
Atlas 46 mentioned in the above article was developed by F. N. Briggs, Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist in the Experiment Station, Davis, and o.C. Riddle, then Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Davis.

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