California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

California Agriculture, Vol. 27, No.4

Cover:  Winegrape acreage: effects of new plantings.
April 1973
Volume 27, Number 4

Research articles

California wine grape acreage: Projecting effects of new San Joaquin and coastal plantings
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.
If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.
Effects of nitrogen and irrigation on yield of feed barley
by Y. Paul Puri, K. G. Baghott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus-type feed barleys showed greatest economical yield response to nitrogen fertilization at rates of up to 140 lbs per acre in the Tulelake Basin. Irrigation before planting and during the tillering stage was necessary for maximum yields. Additional irrigation at the boot stage resulted in increased yields one year and decreased yields another year. Wocus 71, which is 3 to 4 inches shorter in height than Wocus, yielded 8% more grain per acre.
Wocus-type feed barleys showed greatest economical yield response to nitrogen fertilization at rates of up to 140 lbs per acre in the Tulelake Basin. Irrigation before planting and during the tillering stage was necessary for maximum yields. Additional irrigation at the boot stage resulted in increased yields one year and decreased yields another year. Wocus 71, which is 3 to 4 inches shorter in height than Wocus, yielded 8% more grain per acre.
Trunk development of young trees
by Richard W. Harris, Andrew T. Leiser, P. Lanny Neel, Dwight Long, Norman W. Stice, Richard G. Maire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Trees were produced in these tests that could stand erect without staking—by eliminating stakes during production, by leaving lateral branches on the trunk, and by spacing plants so their tops were free to move. Even though rigidly staked trees with lower limbs removed grew taller, they developed less trunk caliper, regardless of whether they were lightly or severely pruned. These trees were not able to stand upright when planted out, while the unstaked trees needed little or no support.
Trees were produced in these tests that could stand erect without staking—by eliminating stakes during production, by leaving lateral branches on the trunk, and by spacing plants so their tops were free to move. Even though rigidly staked trees with lower limbs removed grew taller, they developed less trunk caliper, regardless of whether they were lightly or severely pruned. These trees were not able to stand upright when planted out, while the unstaked trees needed little or no support.
Weight sampling for size measurement of Bartlett pears for canning
by Rene Guillou, William H. Griggs, Galen Geller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent legislation has authorized Federal Marketing Order standards for all Pacific Coast Bartlett pears. If size standards are invoked, they should take into account any variations in shape of pears produced in different districts. Study of fruit measurements in California suggests that sizes of Bartlett pears for canning may be determined satisfactorily by sorting the pears in a sample according to weight. This method has several advantages over the present one based on minimum diameters.
Recent legislation has authorized Federal Marketing Order standards for all Pacific Coast Bartlett pears. If size standards are invoked, they should take into account any variations in shape of pears produced in different districts. Study of fruit measurements in California suggests that sizes of Bartlett pears for canning may be determined satisfactorily by sorting the pears in a sample according to weight. This method has several advantages over the present one based on minimum diameters.
Vigor vs. germination in lettuce seeds under adverse storage conditions
by Norman C. Welch, Orrin E. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Lettuce seeds that have a high germination percentage are not always high in vigor. Low vigor seeds may germinate and emerge from the soil acceptably under favorable conditions, but under unfavorable situations they perform poorly. In recent years, most lettuce growers in the central coast area of California have been using reduced seeding or precision planting techniques. With a reduction in the number of seeds planted per acre, the quality of seeds both in terms of germination and vigor becomes more critical. Rapid emergence of seedlings during the critical stages of emergence, and establishment of the tender plant, is important to help reduce stand losses due to soil crusting, insect and fungi attack.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Lettuce seeds that have a high germination percentage are not always high in vigor. Low vigor seeds may germinate and emerge from the soil acceptably under favorable conditions, but under unfavorable situations they perform poorly. In recent years, most lettuce growers in the central coast area of California have been using reduced seeding or precision planting techniques. With a reduction in the number of seeds planted per acre, the quality of seeds both in terms of germination and vigor becomes more critical. Rapid emergence of seedlings during the critical stages of emergence, and establishment of the tender plant, is important to help reduce stand losses due to soil crusting, insect and fungi attack.
Wocus 71 a new high yielding barley variety
by Y. P. Puri, K. G. Baghott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus 71 barley was selected from the variety Wocus which is grown commercially in the Tulelake area. Foundation seed has been made available to the Tulelake Seed Improvement Committee for increase in 1973.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus 71 barley was selected from the variety Wocus which is grown commercially in the Tulelake area. Foundation seed has been made available to the Tulelake Seed Improvement Committee for increase in 1973.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Confrontation at the cash register
by Boysie E. Day
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Thank you for visiting us at California Agriculture. We have created this printable page for you to easily view our website offline. You can visit this page again by pointing your Internet Browser to-

http://calag.ucanr.edu/archive/index.cfm?issue=27_4

California Agriculture, Vol. 27, No.4

Cover:  Winegrape acreage: effects of new plantings.
April 1973
Volume 27, Number 4

Research articles

California wine grape acreage: Projecting effects of new San Joaquin and coastal plantings
by Kirby S. Moulton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.
If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.
Effects of nitrogen and irrigation on yield of feed barley
by Y. Paul Puri, K. G. Baghott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus-type feed barleys showed greatest economical yield response to nitrogen fertilization at rates of up to 140 lbs per acre in the Tulelake Basin. Irrigation before planting and during the tillering stage was necessary for maximum yields. Additional irrigation at the boot stage resulted in increased yields one year and decreased yields another year. Wocus 71, which is 3 to 4 inches shorter in height than Wocus, yielded 8% more grain per acre.
Wocus-type feed barleys showed greatest economical yield response to nitrogen fertilization at rates of up to 140 lbs per acre in the Tulelake Basin. Irrigation before planting and during the tillering stage was necessary for maximum yields. Additional irrigation at the boot stage resulted in increased yields one year and decreased yields another year. Wocus 71, which is 3 to 4 inches shorter in height than Wocus, yielded 8% more grain per acre.
Trunk development of young trees
by Richard W. Harris, Andrew T. Leiser, P. Lanny Neel, Dwight Long, Norman W. Stice, Richard G. Maire
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Trees were produced in these tests that could stand erect without staking—by eliminating stakes during production, by leaving lateral branches on the trunk, and by spacing plants so their tops were free to move. Even though rigidly staked trees with lower limbs removed grew taller, they developed less trunk caliper, regardless of whether they were lightly or severely pruned. These trees were not able to stand upright when planted out, while the unstaked trees needed little or no support.
Trees were produced in these tests that could stand erect without staking—by eliminating stakes during production, by leaving lateral branches on the trunk, and by spacing plants so their tops were free to move. Even though rigidly staked trees with lower limbs removed grew taller, they developed less trunk caliper, regardless of whether they were lightly or severely pruned. These trees were not able to stand upright when planted out, while the unstaked trees needed little or no support.
Weight sampling for size measurement of Bartlett pears for canning
by Rene Guillou, William H. Griggs, Galen Geller
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Recent legislation has authorized Federal Marketing Order standards for all Pacific Coast Bartlett pears. If size standards are invoked, they should take into account any variations in shape of pears produced in different districts. Study of fruit measurements in California suggests that sizes of Bartlett pears for canning may be determined satisfactorily by sorting the pears in a sample according to weight. This method has several advantages over the present one based on minimum diameters.
Recent legislation has authorized Federal Marketing Order standards for all Pacific Coast Bartlett pears. If size standards are invoked, they should take into account any variations in shape of pears produced in different districts. Study of fruit measurements in California suggests that sizes of Bartlett pears for canning may be determined satisfactorily by sorting the pears in a sample according to weight. This method has several advantages over the present one based on minimum diameters.
Vigor vs. germination in lettuce seeds under adverse storage conditions
by Norman C. Welch, Orrin E. Smith
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Lettuce seeds that have a high germination percentage are not always high in vigor. Low vigor seeds may germinate and emerge from the soil acceptably under favorable conditions, but under unfavorable situations they perform poorly. In recent years, most lettuce growers in the central coast area of California have been using reduced seeding or precision planting techniques. With a reduction in the number of seeds planted per acre, the quality of seeds both in terms of germination and vigor becomes more critical. Rapid emergence of seedlings during the critical stages of emergence, and establishment of the tender plant, is important to help reduce stand losses due to soil crusting, insect and fungi attack.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Lettuce seeds that have a high germination percentage are not always high in vigor. Low vigor seeds may germinate and emerge from the soil acceptably under favorable conditions, but under unfavorable situations they perform poorly. In recent years, most lettuce growers in the central coast area of California have been using reduced seeding or precision planting techniques. With a reduction in the number of seeds planted per acre, the quality of seeds both in terms of germination and vigor becomes more critical. Rapid emergence of seedlings during the critical stages of emergence, and establishment of the tender plant, is important to help reduce stand losses due to soil crusting, insect and fungi attack.
Wocus 71 a new high yielding barley variety
by Y. P. Puri, K. G. Baghott
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus 71 barley was selected from the variety Wocus which is grown commercially in the Tulelake area. Foundation seed has been made available to the Tulelake Seed Improvement Committee for increase in 1973.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wocus 71 barley was selected from the variety Wocus which is grown commercially in the Tulelake area. Foundation seed has been made available to the Tulelake Seed Improvement Committee for increase in 1973.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Confrontation at the cash register
by Boysie E. Day
Full text HTML  | PDF  

University of California, 1301 S. 46th St., Bldg. 478 Richmond, CA
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (510) 665-2163 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Please visit us again at http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu/