California Agriculture
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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.6

Brushland range improvement. . . economic values
June 1972
Volume 26, Number 6

Research articles

Brushland range improvement… economic values
by A. H. Murphy, D. T. Torell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush-covered lands in California are a challenge to the landowner; they may be a blessing or a problem, depending on the management. If the brush cover is manipulated to produce animal feed then value is received from the land; however, if the plant cover becomes a dense thicket, it not only produces little feed but is a fire hazard during dry summer months.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush-covered lands in California are a challenge to the landowner; they may be a blessing or a problem, depending on the management. If the brush cover is manipulated to produce animal feed then value is received from the land; however, if the plant cover becomes a dense thicket, it not only produces little feed but is a fire hazard during dry summer months.
A San Joaquin and Tulare County study of diarrhea in dairy calves
by E. Lopez-Nieto, G. Crenshaw, C. E. Franti, A. D. Wiggins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The problem of diarrhea in dairy calves was studied using samples of dairy farms from two counties in California. Farmers were interviewed concerning (1) the nature and extent of the problem in calves on their farms, and (2) management practices. Survey findings showed differences between the two counties regarding causes of diarrhea; age at onset; and management practices—particularly with respect to vaccination, calving sites, and treatment.
The problem of diarrhea in dairy calves was studied using samples of dairy farms from two counties in California. Farmers were interviewed concerning (1) the nature and extent of the problem in calves on their farms, and (2) management practices. Survey findings showed differences between the two counties regarding causes of diarrhea; age at onset; and management practices—particularly with respect to vaccination, calving sites, and treatment.
Effects of irrigation and fertilizer on INIA 66 wheat …yields, protein, and bushel weights
by H. Yamada, J. St. Andre, R. M. Hoover
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Application of phosphorus and properly timed irrigation appreciably increased yields of late planted wheat. However, phosphorus applications reduced the bushel weights. Higher protein content was obtained by increasing nitrogen rates and by timely irrigation.
Application of phosphorus and properly timed irrigation appreciably increased yields of late planted wheat. However, phosphorus applications reduced the bushel weights. Higher protein content was obtained by increasing nitrogen rates and by timely irrigation.
Sunflower varietal resistance to sunflower moth larvae
by Elmer C. Carlson, Paul F. Knowles, John E. Dillé
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to sunflower heads and seeds by larvae of the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst), is usually economically important. As an alternative to chemical methods of control, it appears that resistant sunflower varieties can be developed. Resistance or tolerance to larval feeding by the sunflower moth has been found in a few of our varieties, but only in those plants with a phytomelanin layer in the hull of the seed. Russian scientists, who term this the “armored layer,” have found that this layer offers resistance to the larvae of the species of the sunflower moth commonly found in Russia.
Damage to sunflower heads and seeds by larvae of the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst), is usually economically important. As an alternative to chemical methods of control, it appears that resistant sunflower varieties can be developed. Resistance or tolerance to larval feeding by the sunflower moth has been found in a few of our varieties, but only in those plants with a phytomelanin layer in the hull of the seed. Russian scientists, who term this the “armored layer,” have found that this layer offers resistance to the larvae of the species of the sunflower moth commonly found in Russia.
Tax-induced cattle feeding
by James G. Youde, Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cattle feeding for income tax deferral has resulted in many nonfarm investors providing substantial capital for cattle feeding in California. This recent growth in outside financing, accomplished mainly through limited-partnership arrangements, has potential economic implications to agriculture. Favorable aspects include a possible smoothing of seasonal variations in feeder and fed cattle prices with increased returns to feeder cattle producers. Participating cattle feedlot operators are better able to utilize their facilities and have probably benefited from their association with limited partnerships. There are also possible economic disadvantages. Non-participating feedlots may encounter problems obtaining the numbers of feeder cattle desired. If feedlots become dependent on these investors, as it appears they have in California, a change in tax laws or investor interest could create problems of adjustment in sources of financing. Also, if cattle funds are available on a sporadic basis, they could increase instability in the fed beef business.
Cattle feeding for income tax deferral has resulted in many nonfarm investors providing substantial capital for cattle feeding in California. This recent growth in outside financing, accomplished mainly through limited-partnership arrangements, has potential economic implications to agriculture. Favorable aspects include a possible smoothing of seasonal variations in feeder and fed cattle prices with increased returns to feeder cattle producers. Participating cattle feedlot operators are better able to utilize their facilities and have probably benefited from their association with limited partnerships. There are also possible economic disadvantages. Non-participating feedlots may encounter problems obtaining the numbers of feeder cattle desired. If feedlots become dependent on these investors, as it appears they have in California, a change in tax laws or investor interest could create problems of adjustment in sources of financing. Also, if cattle funds are available on a sporadic basis, they could increase instability in the fed beef business.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Is California's irrigated agriculture permanent?
by Arthur F. Pillsbury
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.6

Brushland range improvement. . . economic values
June 1972
Volume 26, Number 6

Research articles

Brushland range improvement… economic values
by A. H. Murphy, D. T. Torell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush-covered lands in California are a challenge to the landowner; they may be a blessing or a problem, depending on the management. If the brush cover is manipulated to produce animal feed then value is received from the land; however, if the plant cover becomes a dense thicket, it not only produces little feed but is a fire hazard during dry summer months.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Brush-covered lands in California are a challenge to the landowner; they may be a blessing or a problem, depending on the management. If the brush cover is manipulated to produce animal feed then value is received from the land; however, if the plant cover becomes a dense thicket, it not only produces little feed but is a fire hazard during dry summer months.
A San Joaquin and Tulare County study of diarrhea in dairy calves
by E. Lopez-Nieto, G. Crenshaw, C. E. Franti, A. D. Wiggins
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The problem of diarrhea in dairy calves was studied using samples of dairy farms from two counties in California. Farmers were interviewed concerning (1) the nature and extent of the problem in calves on their farms, and (2) management practices. Survey findings showed differences between the two counties regarding causes of diarrhea; age at onset; and management practices—particularly with respect to vaccination, calving sites, and treatment.
The problem of diarrhea in dairy calves was studied using samples of dairy farms from two counties in California. Farmers were interviewed concerning (1) the nature and extent of the problem in calves on their farms, and (2) management practices. Survey findings showed differences between the two counties regarding causes of diarrhea; age at onset; and management practices—particularly with respect to vaccination, calving sites, and treatment.
Effects of irrigation and fertilizer on INIA 66 wheat …yields, protein, and bushel weights
by H. Yamada, J. St. Andre, R. M. Hoover
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Application of phosphorus and properly timed irrigation appreciably increased yields of late planted wheat. However, phosphorus applications reduced the bushel weights. Higher protein content was obtained by increasing nitrogen rates and by timely irrigation.
Application of phosphorus and properly timed irrigation appreciably increased yields of late planted wheat. However, phosphorus applications reduced the bushel weights. Higher protein content was obtained by increasing nitrogen rates and by timely irrigation.
Sunflower varietal resistance to sunflower moth larvae
by Elmer C. Carlson, Paul F. Knowles, John E. Dillé
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Damage to sunflower heads and seeds by larvae of the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst), is usually economically important. As an alternative to chemical methods of control, it appears that resistant sunflower varieties can be developed. Resistance or tolerance to larval feeding by the sunflower moth has been found in a few of our varieties, but only in those plants with a phytomelanin layer in the hull of the seed. Russian scientists, who term this the “armored layer,” have found that this layer offers resistance to the larvae of the species of the sunflower moth commonly found in Russia.
Damage to sunflower heads and seeds by larvae of the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst), is usually economically important. As an alternative to chemical methods of control, it appears that resistant sunflower varieties can be developed. Resistance or tolerance to larval feeding by the sunflower moth has been found in a few of our varieties, but only in those plants with a phytomelanin layer in the hull of the seed. Russian scientists, who term this the “armored layer,” have found that this layer offers resistance to the larvae of the species of the sunflower moth commonly found in Russia.
Tax-induced cattle feeding
by James G. Youde, Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cattle feeding for income tax deferral has resulted in many nonfarm investors providing substantial capital for cattle feeding in California. This recent growth in outside financing, accomplished mainly through limited-partnership arrangements, has potential economic implications to agriculture. Favorable aspects include a possible smoothing of seasonal variations in feeder and fed cattle prices with increased returns to feeder cattle producers. Participating cattle feedlot operators are better able to utilize their facilities and have probably benefited from their association with limited partnerships. There are also possible economic disadvantages. Non-participating feedlots may encounter problems obtaining the numbers of feeder cattle desired. If feedlots become dependent on these investors, as it appears they have in California, a change in tax laws or investor interest could create problems of adjustment in sources of financing. Also, if cattle funds are available on a sporadic basis, they could increase instability in the fed beef business.
Cattle feeding for income tax deferral has resulted in many nonfarm investors providing substantial capital for cattle feeding in California. This recent growth in outside financing, accomplished mainly through limited-partnership arrangements, has potential economic implications to agriculture. Favorable aspects include a possible smoothing of seasonal variations in feeder and fed cattle prices with increased returns to feeder cattle producers. Participating cattle feedlot operators are better able to utilize their facilities and have probably benefited from their association with limited partnerships. There are also possible economic disadvantages. Non-participating feedlots may encounter problems obtaining the numbers of feeder cattle desired. If feedlots become dependent on these investors, as it appears they have in California, a change in tax laws or investor interest could create problems of adjustment in sources of financing. Also, if cattle funds are available on a sporadic basis, they could increase instability in the fed beef business.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Is California's irrigated agriculture permanent?
by Arthur F. Pillsbury
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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