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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.1

Rootstock influence onbloom period of Bartlett pear after a mild winter.
January 1972
Volume 26, Number 1

Research articles

Influence of rootstock on bloom period of Bartlett pear after a mild winter
by W. H. Griggs, J. A. Beutel, B. T. Iwakiri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: After a mild winter, Bartlett on Old Home rootstock bloomed earlier and more uniformly than Bartlett on other rootstocks or own-rooted Bartlett trees. Normal blossoming time of the rootstock appeared to be unrelated to its influence on the bloom period of the Bartlett scion. Also, differences in time of bloom apparently were not associated with tree vigor. This research indicates that Old Home rootstock may be valuable in areas where production of Bartlett is limited by insufficient chilling.
After a mild winter, Bartlett on Old Home rootstock bloomed earlier and more uniformly than Bartlett on other rootstocks or own-rooted Bartlett trees. Normal blossoming time of the rootstock appeared to be unrelated to its influence on the bloom period of the Bartlett scion. Also, differences in time of bloom apparently were not associated with tree vigor. This research indicates that Old Home rootstock may be valuable in areas where production of Bartlett is limited by insufficient chilling.
Virgin female traps aid control survey for omnivorous leaf roller in San Joaquin Valley vineyards
by M. T. Ali Niazee, E. M. Stafford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early identification of pest species is essential to the successful planning and operation of integrated control and pest management programs. Growers can then minimize the damages caused by insects though timely manipulation of various control measures, including chemical treatments, cultural practices, and harvest schedules. Detection and survey methods used include the hand search for both mature and immature stages, direct collection by D-Vac (a suction insect collecting device), sweep nets, a study of the damage index, and use of various types of traps. Black light traps have usually been used for surveys; however in recent years, the pheromone trap has become more common.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early identification of pest species is essential to the successful planning and operation of integrated control and pest management programs. Growers can then minimize the damages caused by insects though timely manipulation of various control measures, including chemical treatments, cultural practices, and harvest schedules. Detection and survey methods used include the hand search for both mature and immature stages, direct collection by D-Vac (a suction insect collecting device), sweep nets, a study of the damage index, and use of various types of traps. Black light traps have usually been used for surveys; however in recent years, the pheromone trap has become more common.
Minimum spacing studies for lettuce
by David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two possibilities exist as ways to eliminate hand thinning in lettuce production: (1) to combine precision planting with the use of a selective thinner; and (2) to plant to a stand, utilizing improved seed environment control with respect to plant protection, soil crust prevention, and moisture control. Regardless of which system the grower chooses, he must decide on a minimum spacing that can be tolerated, without sacrificing head size, quality or yield. If the thinner is used, the cutting mechanism should be set to leave plants as close as possible to that minimum spacing. If planting to a stand is practiced, then the minimum spacing will result in maximum plant population, thereby giving better yield insurance to cover any loss of stand. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum plant spacing that could be tolerated without yield or quality loss under field conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two possibilities exist as ways to eliminate hand thinning in lettuce production: (1) to combine precision planting with the use of a selective thinner; and (2) to plant to a stand, utilizing improved seed environment control with respect to plant protection, soil crust prevention, and moisture control. Regardless of which system the grower chooses, he must decide on a minimum spacing that can be tolerated, without sacrificing head size, quality or yield. If the thinner is used, the cutting mechanism should be set to leave plants as close as possible to that minimum spacing. If planting to a stand is practiced, then the minimum spacing will result in maximum plant population, thereby giving better yield insurance to cover any loss of stand. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum plant spacing that could be tolerated without yield or quality loss under field conditions.
Single-cut harvesting of chrysanthemums for commercial marketing
by Thomas G. Byrne, Peter J. Lert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Single-cut or “once-over” harvesting of standard chrysanthemums may be possible commercially, according to results of trials conducted during the summer and fall of 1971 at floriculture greenhouses of the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose. Cultivars tested included ‘Albatross,’ ‘Detroit News’ and ‘Escapade.’ These are the major white, bronze and pink standards grown during the summer in California. Additional trials with other cultivars are in progress.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Single-cut or “once-over” harvesting of standard chrysanthemums may be possible commercially, according to results of trials conducted during the summer and fall of 1971 at floriculture greenhouses of the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose. Cultivars tested included ‘Albatross,’ ‘Detroit News’ and ‘Escapade.’ These are the major white, bronze and pink standards grown during the summer in California. Additional trials with other cultivars are in progress.
Weed control studies in tomatoes, 1968–70
by H. Agamalian, B. Fischer, F. Ashton, A. Lange, E. Stilwell, R. Brendler, H. Kempen, V. Schweers, H. Collins, R. King, L. Buschmann, J. Orr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The development of selective herbicides has been basic to the profitable use of the mechanical tomato harvester. Weeds must be efficiently controlled if such machines are to operate effectively in California tomato fields. About 40% of California's tomatoes were treated with herbicides for annual preemergence weed control in 1965. Only five years later over twice this acreage was treated (87% in a 1970 survey). The most common weeds in tomato fields include barnyard grass, pigweed, nightshade, nutsedge, shepherd's purse, and many other broadleaf weeds and grasses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The development of selective herbicides has been basic to the profitable use of the mechanical tomato harvester. Weeds must be efficiently controlled if such machines are to operate effectively in California tomato fields. About 40% of California's tomatoes were treated with herbicides for annual preemergence weed control in 1965. Only five years later over twice this acreage was treated (87% in a 1970 survey). The most common weeds in tomato fields include barnyard grass, pigweed, nightshade, nutsedge, shepherd's purse, and many other broadleaf weeds and grasses.
Safflower production under minimum and maximum soil preparation in Imperial Valley
by G. F. Worker, P. F. Knowles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yields of safflower (following cotton) produced under minimum tillage (at substantially reduced costs) remained as high as when the crop was produced under maximum tillage practices, according to the three-year study reported here.
Yields of safflower (following cotton) produced under minimum tillage (at substantially reduced costs) remained as high as when the crop was produced under maximum tillage practices, according to the three-year study reported here.
Dormant sprays with experimental insecticides for control of peach twig borer
by R. E. Rice, R. A. Jones, J. H. Black
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These trials indicate that several experimental materials would be very effective on peach twig borers. It is also apparent that dormant sprays provide an excellent means for reducing peach twig borer populations, and at a time of year when spraying results in probably the least ecological disruption. Dormant sprays in other trials have also proved effective for control of San Jose scale, and overwintering mite and aphid eggs.
These trials indicate that several experimental materials would be very effective on peach twig borers. It is also apparent that dormant sprays provide an excellent means for reducing peach twig borer populations, and at a time of year when spraying results in probably the least ecological disruption. Dormant sprays in other trials have also proved effective for control of San Jose scale, and overwintering mite and aphid eggs.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Production research… and environmental quality
by Donald R. Nielsen
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 26, No.1

Rootstock influence onbloom period of Bartlett pear after a mild winter.
January 1972
Volume 26, Number 1

Research articles

Influence of rootstock on bloom period of Bartlett pear after a mild winter
by W. H. Griggs, J. A. Beutel, B. T. Iwakiri
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: After a mild winter, Bartlett on Old Home rootstock bloomed earlier and more uniformly than Bartlett on other rootstocks or own-rooted Bartlett trees. Normal blossoming time of the rootstock appeared to be unrelated to its influence on the bloom period of the Bartlett scion. Also, differences in time of bloom apparently were not associated with tree vigor. This research indicates that Old Home rootstock may be valuable in areas where production of Bartlett is limited by insufficient chilling.
After a mild winter, Bartlett on Old Home rootstock bloomed earlier and more uniformly than Bartlett on other rootstocks or own-rooted Bartlett trees. Normal blossoming time of the rootstock appeared to be unrelated to its influence on the bloom period of the Bartlett scion. Also, differences in time of bloom apparently were not associated with tree vigor. This research indicates that Old Home rootstock may be valuable in areas where production of Bartlett is limited by insufficient chilling.
Virgin female traps aid control survey for omnivorous leaf roller in San Joaquin Valley vineyards
by M. T. Ali Niazee, E. M. Stafford
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early identification of pest species is essential to the successful planning and operation of integrated control and pest management programs. Growers can then minimize the damages caused by insects though timely manipulation of various control measures, including chemical treatments, cultural practices, and harvest schedules. Detection and survey methods used include the hand search for both mature and immature stages, direct collection by D-Vac (a suction insect collecting device), sweep nets, a study of the damage index, and use of various types of traps. Black light traps have usually been used for surveys; however in recent years, the pheromone trap has become more common.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early identification of pest species is essential to the successful planning and operation of integrated control and pest management programs. Growers can then minimize the damages caused by insects though timely manipulation of various control measures, including chemical treatments, cultural practices, and harvest schedules. Detection and survey methods used include the hand search for both mature and immature stages, direct collection by D-Vac (a suction insect collecting device), sweep nets, a study of the damage index, and use of various types of traps. Black light traps have usually been used for surveys; however in recent years, the pheromone trap has become more common.
Minimum spacing studies for lettuce
by David Ririe
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two possibilities exist as ways to eliminate hand thinning in lettuce production: (1) to combine precision planting with the use of a selective thinner; and (2) to plant to a stand, utilizing improved seed environment control with respect to plant protection, soil crust prevention, and moisture control. Regardless of which system the grower chooses, he must decide on a minimum spacing that can be tolerated, without sacrificing head size, quality or yield. If the thinner is used, the cutting mechanism should be set to leave plants as close as possible to that minimum spacing. If planting to a stand is practiced, then the minimum spacing will result in maximum plant population, thereby giving better yield insurance to cover any loss of stand. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum plant spacing that could be tolerated without yield or quality loss under field conditions.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two possibilities exist as ways to eliminate hand thinning in lettuce production: (1) to combine precision planting with the use of a selective thinner; and (2) to plant to a stand, utilizing improved seed environment control with respect to plant protection, soil crust prevention, and moisture control. Regardless of which system the grower chooses, he must decide on a minimum spacing that can be tolerated, without sacrificing head size, quality or yield. If the thinner is used, the cutting mechanism should be set to leave plants as close as possible to that minimum spacing. If planting to a stand is practiced, then the minimum spacing will result in maximum plant population, thereby giving better yield insurance to cover any loss of stand. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum plant spacing that could be tolerated without yield or quality loss under field conditions.
Single-cut harvesting of chrysanthemums for commercial marketing
by Thomas G. Byrne, Peter J. Lert
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Single-cut or “once-over” harvesting of standard chrysanthemums may be possible commercially, according to results of trials conducted during the summer and fall of 1971 at floriculture greenhouses of the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose. Cultivars tested included ‘Albatross,’ ‘Detroit News’ and ‘Escapade.’ These are the major white, bronze and pink standards grown during the summer in California. Additional trials with other cultivars are in progress.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Single-cut or “once-over” harvesting of standard chrysanthemums may be possible commercially, according to results of trials conducted during the summer and fall of 1971 at floriculture greenhouses of the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose. Cultivars tested included ‘Albatross,’ ‘Detroit News’ and ‘Escapade.’ These are the major white, bronze and pink standards grown during the summer in California. Additional trials with other cultivars are in progress.
Weed control studies in tomatoes, 1968–70
by H. Agamalian, B. Fischer, F. Ashton, A. Lange, E. Stilwell, R. Brendler, H. Kempen, V. Schweers, H. Collins, R. King, L. Buschmann, J. Orr
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The development of selective herbicides has been basic to the profitable use of the mechanical tomato harvester. Weeds must be efficiently controlled if such machines are to operate effectively in California tomato fields. About 40% of California's tomatoes were treated with herbicides for annual preemergence weed control in 1965. Only five years later over twice this acreage was treated (87% in a 1970 survey). The most common weeds in tomato fields include barnyard grass, pigweed, nightshade, nutsedge, shepherd's purse, and many other broadleaf weeds and grasses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The development of selective herbicides has been basic to the profitable use of the mechanical tomato harvester. Weeds must be efficiently controlled if such machines are to operate effectively in California tomato fields. About 40% of California's tomatoes were treated with herbicides for annual preemergence weed control in 1965. Only five years later over twice this acreage was treated (87% in a 1970 survey). The most common weeds in tomato fields include barnyard grass, pigweed, nightshade, nutsedge, shepherd's purse, and many other broadleaf weeds and grasses.
Safflower production under minimum and maximum soil preparation in Imperial Valley
by G. F. Worker, P. F. Knowles
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Yields of safflower (following cotton) produced under minimum tillage (at substantially reduced costs) remained as high as when the crop was produced under maximum tillage practices, according to the three-year study reported here.
Yields of safflower (following cotton) produced under minimum tillage (at substantially reduced costs) remained as high as when the crop was produced under maximum tillage practices, according to the three-year study reported here.
Dormant sprays with experimental insecticides for control of peach twig borer
by R. E. Rice, R. A. Jones, J. H. Black
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These trials indicate that several experimental materials would be very effective on peach twig borers. It is also apparent that dormant sprays provide an excellent means for reducing peach twig borer populations, and at a time of year when spraying results in probably the least ecological disruption. Dormant sprays in other trials have also proved effective for control of San Jose scale, and overwintering mite and aphid eggs.
These trials indicate that several experimental materials would be very effective on peach twig borers. It is also apparent that dormant sprays provide an excellent means for reducing peach twig borer populations, and at a time of year when spraying results in probably the least ecological disruption. Dormant sprays in other trials have also proved effective for control of San Jose scale, and overwintering mite and aphid eggs.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Production research… and environmental quality
by Donald R. Nielsen
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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