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California Agriculture, Vol. 25, No.12

Cover:  Measurement of top regrowth on Bacon avocado trees after spraying with growth retardants.
December 1971
Volume 25, Number 12

Research articles

Chemical inhibition of avocado top regrowth
by S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two new growth-retardants—NIA-10637 and NIA-10656—sprayed on regrowth of topped Bacon avocado trees in Ventura County resulted in significant growth inhibition.
Two new growth-retardants—NIA-10637 and NIA-10656—sprayed on regrowth of topped Bacon avocado trees in Ventura County resulted in significant growth inhibition.
Chemically induced sprouting of axillary buds in avocados
by C. D. McCarty, S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.
Tax loss cattle investments
by Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The income tax advantages of cattle investments, and their use by nonfarm investors as a tax shelter, are examined in this study. A budgeted example is included showing that investors continue to realize positive returns, even after passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969. Tax advantages in cattle investments are the greatest for taxpayers in the highest marginal income tax brackets.
The income tax advantages of cattle investments, and their use by nonfarm investors as a tax shelter, are examined in this study. A budgeted example is included showing that investors continue to realize positive returns, even after passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969. Tax advantages in cattle investments are the greatest for taxpayers in the highest marginal income tax brackets.
Effects of root pruning and time of transplanting in nursery liner production
by R. W. Harris, W. B. Davis, N. W. Stice, Dwight Long
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Root pruning and care during the first two nursery transplantings of four tree species significantly increased the percentage of plants with good root systems. The earlier the plants were moved from the seedflat into peat pots and then into gallon cans, the higher the percentage of plants with good root systems, and the larger they grew in caliper and height. Plants root-pruned during the early moves were larger than those not pruned. However, later root pruning resulted in smaller plants than those moved earlier, or than those moved at the same time but not root pruned.
Root pruning and care during the first two nursery transplantings of four tree species significantly increased the percentage of plants with good root systems. The earlier the plants were moved from the seedflat into peat pots and then into gallon cans, the higher the percentage of plants with good root systems, and the larger they grew in caliper and height. Plants root-pruned during the early moves were larger than those not pruned. However, later root pruning resulted in smaller plants than those moved earlier, or than those moved at the same time but not root pruned.
The male inhibition technique… cabbage looper control by confusing sex pheromone communication
by H. H. Shorey, L. K. Gaston, L. L. Sower
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Confused males—and effective control of cabbage looper—resulted from the uniform placement of synthetic sex pheromone stations spaced about 100 m apart in field tests. The synthetic sex pheromone of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Noctuidae) was continuously evaporated from uniformly spaced sources in a field at a rate of about 1 mg per hectare per night. Males of this species were almost completely prevented from locating pheromone-releasing females. This male inhibition technique offers considerable promise for the control of insect pest populations.
Confused males—and effective control of cabbage looper—resulted from the uniform placement of synthetic sex pheromone stations spaced about 100 m apart in field tests. The synthetic sex pheromone of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Noctuidae) was continuously evaporated from uniformly spaced sources in a field at a rate of about 1 mg per hectare per night. Males of this species were almost completely prevented from locating pheromone-releasing females. This male inhibition technique offers considerable promise for the control of insect pest populations.
Nitrogen load of soil in ground water from dairy manure
by D. C. Adriano, P. F. Pratt, S. E. Bishop, W. Brock, J. Oliver, W. Fairbank
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deep drilling of soil profiles in the Chino-Corona dairy area, which has an estimated average NO-3 concentration of about 315 ppm (70 ppm NO3-N) in drainage water underneath croplands and pastures. Predictions for the NO-3 concentration in the drainage water in the unsaturated zone for this disposal rate agree with this determined value. The disposal rate should be lowered to about three to four cows per disposal acre to have an acceptable NO-3 load in the drainage water.
Deep drilling of soil profiles in the Chino-Corona dairy area, which has an estimated average NO-3 concentration of about 315 ppm (70 ppm NO3-N) in drainage water underneath croplands and pastures. Predictions for the NO-3 concentration in the drainage water in the unsaturated zone for this disposal rate agree with this determined value. The disposal rate should be lowered to about three to four cows per disposal acre to have an acceptable NO-3 load in the drainage water.
A progress report… dates of planting for asparagus production
by F. H. Takatori, J. I. Stillman, F. D. Souther
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.
These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Thanks!
by C. F. Kelly
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 25, No.12

Cover:  Measurement of top regrowth on Bacon avocado trees after spraying with growth retardants.
December 1971
Volume 25, Number 12

Research articles

Chemical inhibition of avocado top regrowth
by S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns, C. D. McCarty
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Two new growth-retardants—NIA-10637 and NIA-10656—sprayed on regrowth of topped Bacon avocado trees in Ventura County resulted in significant growth inhibition.
Two new growth-retardants—NIA-10637 and NIA-10656—sprayed on regrowth of topped Bacon avocado trees in Ventura County resulted in significant growth inhibition.
Chemically induced sprouting of axillary buds in avocados
by C. D. McCarty, S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.
Tax loss cattle investments
by Hoy F. Carman
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The income tax advantages of cattle investments, and their use by nonfarm investors as a tax shelter, are examined in this study. A budgeted example is included showing that investors continue to realize positive returns, even after passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969. Tax advantages in cattle investments are the greatest for taxpayers in the highest marginal income tax brackets.
The income tax advantages of cattle investments, and their use by nonfarm investors as a tax shelter, are examined in this study. A budgeted example is included showing that investors continue to realize positive returns, even after passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969. Tax advantages in cattle investments are the greatest for taxpayers in the highest marginal income tax brackets.
Effects of root pruning and time of transplanting in nursery liner production
by R. W. Harris, W. B. Davis, N. W. Stice, Dwight Long
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Root pruning and care during the first two nursery transplantings of four tree species significantly increased the percentage of plants with good root systems. The earlier the plants were moved from the seedflat into peat pots and then into gallon cans, the higher the percentage of plants with good root systems, and the larger they grew in caliper and height. Plants root-pruned during the early moves were larger than those not pruned. However, later root pruning resulted in smaller plants than those moved earlier, or than those moved at the same time but not root pruned.
Root pruning and care during the first two nursery transplantings of four tree species significantly increased the percentage of plants with good root systems. The earlier the plants were moved from the seedflat into peat pots and then into gallon cans, the higher the percentage of plants with good root systems, and the larger they grew in caliper and height. Plants root-pruned during the early moves were larger than those not pruned. However, later root pruning resulted in smaller plants than those moved earlier, or than those moved at the same time but not root pruned.
The male inhibition technique… cabbage looper control by confusing sex pheromone communication
by H. H. Shorey, L. K. Gaston, L. L. Sower
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Confused males—and effective control of cabbage looper—resulted from the uniform placement of synthetic sex pheromone stations spaced about 100 m apart in field tests. The synthetic sex pheromone of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Noctuidae) was continuously evaporated from uniformly spaced sources in a field at a rate of about 1 mg per hectare per night. Males of this species were almost completely prevented from locating pheromone-releasing females. This male inhibition technique offers considerable promise for the control of insect pest populations.
Confused males—and effective control of cabbage looper—resulted from the uniform placement of synthetic sex pheromone stations spaced about 100 m apart in field tests. The synthetic sex pheromone of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Noctuidae) was continuously evaporated from uniformly spaced sources in a field at a rate of about 1 mg per hectare per night. Males of this species were almost completely prevented from locating pheromone-releasing females. This male inhibition technique offers considerable promise for the control of insect pest populations.
Nitrogen load of soil in ground water from dairy manure
by D. C. Adriano, P. F. Pratt, S. E. Bishop, W. Brock, J. Oliver, W. Fairbank
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deep drilling of soil profiles in the Chino-Corona dairy area, which has an estimated average NO-3 concentration of about 315 ppm (70 ppm NO3-N) in drainage water underneath croplands and pastures. Predictions for the NO-3 concentration in the drainage water in the unsaturated zone for this disposal rate agree with this determined value. The disposal rate should be lowered to about three to four cows per disposal acre to have an acceptable NO-3 load in the drainage water.
Deep drilling of soil profiles in the Chino-Corona dairy area, which has an estimated average NO-3 concentration of about 315 ppm (70 ppm NO3-N) in drainage water underneath croplands and pastures. Predictions for the NO-3 concentration in the drainage water in the unsaturated zone for this disposal rate agree with this determined value. The disposal rate should be lowered to about three to four cows per disposal acre to have an acceptable NO-3 load in the drainage water.
A progress report… dates of planting for asparagus production
by F. H. Takatori, J. I. Stillman, F. D. Souther
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.
These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Thanks!
by C. F. Kelly
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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