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California Agriculture, Vol. 20, No.2

Date Harvest Mechanization
February 1966
Volume 20, Number 2

Research articles

Insemination techniques and timing found important factors in turkey fertility studies on a commercial farm
by W. F. Rooney, F. X. Ogasawara, D. C. Ferebee
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: When a fertility problem arises, results of these studies suggest that it is most important to carefully examine insemination procedures. Introducing semen into the oviduct to a depth of a half inch did not lower candling reports in 1964–65; however, very shallow insemination, as in the 1963–64 experiment, resulted in lower candling reports. Weekly insemination gave far better candling reports during the second half of each year's experiments, especially in the 1963–64 season. Growers may find it more profitable to inseminate weekly during the second half of the breeder season. Weekly insemination may be the answer to fertility problems in some flocks. Candling reports with diluted semen were found to be as good as those with undiluted semen in these tests.
When a fertility problem arises, results of these studies suggest that it is most important to carefully examine insemination procedures. Introducing semen into the oviduct to a depth of a half inch did not lower candling reports in 1964–65; however, very shallow insemination, as in the 1963–64 experiment, resulted in lower candling reports. Weekly insemination gave far better candling reports during the second half of each year's experiments, especially in the 1963–64 season. Growers may find it more profitable to inseminate weekly during the second half of the breeder season. Weekly insemination may be the answer to fertility problems in some flocks. Candling reports with diluted semen were found to be as good as those with undiluted semen in these tests.
Controlling height of hydrangeas with growth retardants
by H. C. Kohl, R. L. Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Treatment of hydrangea plants with the growth retardant B-Nine is a promising method for saving production costs. The shorter plants do not have to be staked, and blooms are often more beautiful than untreated plants.
Treatment of hydrangea plants with the growth retardant B-Nine is a promising method for saving production costs. The shorter plants do not have to be staked, and blooms are often more beautiful than untreated plants.
Micronutrient deficiencies of Copic Bay soils in Tulelake Basin
by Herman Timm, L. J. Clemente, J. W. Perdue, K. G. Baghott, B. J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.
Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.
Date harvest mechanization
by R. M. Perkins, G. K. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research started in 1961 by agricultural engineers of USDA and University of California has led to commercial acceptance of mechanical harvesting methods with resulting labor and cost savings for California date growers. About 65% of the 1965–66 date crop is expected to be harvested with the aid of various mechanical systems that can reduce labor requirements from 50 to 80%, as compared with conventional hand picking.
Research started in 1961 by agricultural engineers of USDA and University of California has led to commercial acceptance of mechanical harvesting methods with resulting labor and cost savings for California date growers. About 65% of the 1965–66 date crop is expected to be harvested with the aid of various mechanical systems that can reduce labor requirements from 50 to 80%, as compared with conventional hand picking.
Picloram …a promising new herbicide for control of woody plant
by J. R. Goodin, L. R. Green, V. W. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: IN MORE THAN 20 years of research on the chemical control of plant growth, many hundreds of compounds with herbicidal activity have been tested on woody plants and then fallen into obscurity. The standard of comparison for all new chemicals has been and remains 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and related chemicals. Their physiological activity, although less than desired, is superior to any other compounds screened.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: IN MORE THAN 20 years of research on the chemical control of plant growth, many hundreds of compounds with herbicidal activity have been tested on woody plants and then fallen into obscurity. The standard of comparison for all new chemicals has been and remains 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and related chemicals. Their physiological activity, although less than desired, is superior to any other compounds screened.
Encore and Pixie … two new mandarin hybrids with unusually late seasons of use
by J. W. Cameron, R. K. Soost, H. B. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Encore and Pixie are two new citrus hybrids, suitable for eating out of hand in late spring to summer. Both were originated at the University's Citrus Research Center in Riverside and evaluated primarily in the Riverside area.
Encore and Pixie are two new citrus hybrids, suitable for eating out of hand in late spring to summer. Both were originated at the University's Citrus Research Center in Riverside and evaluated primarily in the Riverside area.
Citrus problems in West Fresno County
by L. T. Browne, R. G. Platt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The possibility of growing citrus crops on the eastern slopes of the coast range in Fresno County has gained considerable attention since the cotton allotment reductions. The deep, well-drained, fertile soil; a good water supply from the San Luis reservoir and canal system; and a possible thermal belt are some of the advantages found in the area. However, many questions remain to be answered. The citrus specialists at Riverside, cooperating with the Fresno County farm advisor, are currently engaged in investigations to determine whether the high boron levels in this area might preclude citrus crops; how weather conditions there would affect citrus; and which of the commonly used scion-rootstock combinations could be adapted. Preliminary studies reported here indicate: (1) that proper leaching with good quality water could reduce boron damage; (2) that high wind velocities probably can be controlled with windbreaks; and (3) that of the 47 scion-root-stock combinations observed, Valencia and navel on trifoliate orange rootstock made the best showing. However, much research remains to be accomplished before definite conclusions can be stated.
The possibility of growing citrus crops on the eastern slopes of the coast range in Fresno County has gained considerable attention since the cotton allotment reductions. The deep, well-drained, fertile soil; a good water supply from the San Luis reservoir and canal system; and a possible thermal belt are some of the advantages found in the area. However, many questions remain to be answered. The citrus specialists at Riverside, cooperating with the Fresno County farm advisor, are currently engaged in investigations to determine whether the high boron levels in this area might preclude citrus crops; how weather conditions there would affect citrus; and which of the commonly used scion-rootstock combinations could be adapted. Preliminary studies reported here indicate: (1) that proper leaching with good quality water could reduce boron damage; (2) that high wind velocities probably can be controlled with windbreaks; and (3) that of the 47 scion-root-stock combinations observed, Valencia and navel on trifoliate orange rootstock made the best showing. However, much research remains to be accomplished before definite conclusions can be stated.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 20, No.2

Date Harvest Mechanization
February 1966
Volume 20, Number 2

Research articles

Insemination techniques and timing found important factors in turkey fertility studies on a commercial farm
by W. F. Rooney, F. X. Ogasawara, D. C. Ferebee
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: When a fertility problem arises, results of these studies suggest that it is most important to carefully examine insemination procedures. Introducing semen into the oviduct to a depth of a half inch did not lower candling reports in 1964–65; however, very shallow insemination, as in the 1963–64 experiment, resulted in lower candling reports. Weekly insemination gave far better candling reports during the second half of each year's experiments, especially in the 1963–64 season. Growers may find it more profitable to inseminate weekly during the second half of the breeder season. Weekly insemination may be the answer to fertility problems in some flocks. Candling reports with diluted semen were found to be as good as those with undiluted semen in these tests.
When a fertility problem arises, results of these studies suggest that it is most important to carefully examine insemination procedures. Introducing semen into the oviduct to a depth of a half inch did not lower candling reports in 1964–65; however, very shallow insemination, as in the 1963–64 experiment, resulted in lower candling reports. Weekly insemination gave far better candling reports during the second half of each year's experiments, especially in the 1963–64 season. Growers may find it more profitable to inseminate weekly during the second half of the breeder season. Weekly insemination may be the answer to fertility problems in some flocks. Candling reports with diluted semen were found to be as good as those with undiluted semen in these tests.
Controlling height of hydrangeas with growth retardants
by H. C. Kohl, R. L. Nelson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Treatment of hydrangea plants with the growth retardant B-Nine is a promising method for saving production costs. The shorter plants do not have to be staked, and blooms are often more beautiful than untreated plants.
Treatment of hydrangea plants with the growth retardant B-Nine is a promising method for saving production costs. The shorter plants do not have to be staked, and blooms are often more beautiful than untreated plants.
Micronutrient deficiencies of Copic Bay soils in Tulelake Basin
by Herman Timm, L. J. Clemente, J. W. Perdue, K. G. Baghott, B. J. Hoyle
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.
Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.
Date harvest mechanization
by R. M. Perkins, G. K. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research started in 1961 by agricultural engineers of USDA and University of California has led to commercial acceptance of mechanical harvesting methods with resulting labor and cost savings for California date growers. About 65% of the 1965–66 date crop is expected to be harvested with the aid of various mechanical systems that can reduce labor requirements from 50 to 80%, as compared with conventional hand picking.
Research started in 1961 by agricultural engineers of USDA and University of California has led to commercial acceptance of mechanical harvesting methods with resulting labor and cost savings for California date growers. About 65% of the 1965–66 date crop is expected to be harvested with the aid of various mechanical systems that can reduce labor requirements from 50 to 80%, as compared with conventional hand picking.
Picloram …a promising new herbicide for control of woody plant
by J. R. Goodin, L. R. Green, V. W. Brown
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: IN MORE THAN 20 years of research on the chemical control of plant growth, many hundreds of compounds with herbicidal activity have been tested on woody plants and then fallen into obscurity. The standard of comparison for all new chemicals has been and remains 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and related chemicals. Their physiological activity, although less than desired, is superior to any other compounds screened.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: IN MORE THAN 20 years of research on the chemical control of plant growth, many hundreds of compounds with herbicidal activity have been tested on woody plants and then fallen into obscurity. The standard of comparison for all new chemicals has been and remains 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and related chemicals. Their physiological activity, although less than desired, is superior to any other compounds screened.
Encore and Pixie … two new mandarin hybrids with unusually late seasons of use
by J. W. Cameron, R. K. Soost, H. B. Frost
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Encore and Pixie are two new citrus hybrids, suitable for eating out of hand in late spring to summer. Both were originated at the University's Citrus Research Center in Riverside and evaluated primarily in the Riverside area.
Encore and Pixie are two new citrus hybrids, suitable for eating out of hand in late spring to summer. Both were originated at the University's Citrus Research Center in Riverside and evaluated primarily in the Riverside area.
Citrus problems in West Fresno County
by L. T. Browne, R. G. Platt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The possibility of growing citrus crops on the eastern slopes of the coast range in Fresno County has gained considerable attention since the cotton allotment reductions. The deep, well-drained, fertile soil; a good water supply from the San Luis reservoir and canal system; and a possible thermal belt are some of the advantages found in the area. However, many questions remain to be answered. The citrus specialists at Riverside, cooperating with the Fresno County farm advisor, are currently engaged in investigations to determine whether the high boron levels in this area might preclude citrus crops; how weather conditions there would affect citrus; and which of the commonly used scion-rootstock combinations could be adapted. Preliminary studies reported here indicate: (1) that proper leaching with good quality water could reduce boron damage; (2) that high wind velocities probably can be controlled with windbreaks; and (3) that of the 47 scion-root-stock combinations observed, Valencia and navel on trifoliate orange rootstock made the best showing. However, much research remains to be accomplished before definite conclusions can be stated.
The possibility of growing citrus crops on the eastern slopes of the coast range in Fresno County has gained considerable attention since the cotton allotment reductions. The deep, well-drained, fertile soil; a good water supply from the San Luis reservoir and canal system; and a possible thermal belt are some of the advantages found in the area. However, many questions remain to be answered. The citrus specialists at Riverside, cooperating with the Fresno County farm advisor, are currently engaged in investigations to determine whether the high boron levels in this area might preclude citrus crops; how weather conditions there would affect citrus; and which of the commonly used scion-rootstock combinations could be adapted. Preliminary studies reported here indicate: (1) that proper leaching with good quality water could reduce boron damage; (2) that high wind velocities probably can be controlled with windbreaks; and (3) that of the 47 scion-root-stock combinations observed, Valencia and navel on trifoliate orange rootstock made the best showing. However, much research remains to be accomplished before definite conclusions can be stated.

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