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Micronutrient deficiencies of Copic Bay soils in Tulelake Basin

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Authors

Herman Timm , University of California
L. J. Clemente, University of California
J. W. Perdue, University of California
K. G. Baghott
B. J. Hoyle

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(2):6-7.

Published February 01, 1966

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Abstract

Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.

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Author notes

This progress report is based on Research Project No. H-1665.

Micronutrient deficiencies of Copic Bay soils in Tulelake Basin

Herman Timm, L. J. Clemente, J. W. Perdue, K. G. Baghott, B. J. Hoyle
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Micronutrient deficiencies of Copic Bay soils in Tulelake Basin

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Herman Timm , University of California
L. J. Clemente, University of California
J. W. Perdue, University of California
K. G. Baghott
B. J. Hoyle

Publication Information

California Agriculture 20(2):6-7.

Published February 01, 1966

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Under greenhouse conditions, iron and manganese deficiencies in potato and sorghum test plants have been identified when grown in soils from Copic Bay. However, correction of these micronutrient deficiencies in the potato and enhancement of tuber yields have not been realized under field conditions. Cultural practices, frost damage, and severity of Rhizoctonia infection have minimized plant response to fertilizer treatments.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This progress report is based on Research Project No. H-1665.


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