California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

December 1946
Volume 1, Number 1

Research articles

New strains of wheat bred by agronomists at Davis increase yields nearly 25 per cent
by Fred N. Briggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The average in wheat yield today in California is almost 25 per cent greater than it was during the four decades prior to the beginning of wheat research work done by the College of Agriculture, in 1904, and practically the entire wheat acreage in the state is planted to varieties which were bred and improved by the Division of Agronomy.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The average in wheat yield today in California is almost 25 per cent greater than it was during the four decades prior to the beginning of wheat research work done by the College of Agriculture, in 1904, and practically the entire wheat acreage in the state is planted to varieties which were bred and improved by the Division of Agronomy.
Army of 23 million wasps is winning fight to control the oriental fruit moth in state
by Glenn L. Finney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: With a record of kills as high as 85 per cent, an army of 23 million has aided in California's battle against the dread Oriental fruit moth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: With a record of kills as high as 85 per cent, an army of 23 million has aided in California's battle against the dread Oriental fruit moth.
Nutrients for beef cattle are outlined
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An extract from a new Agricultural Extension Service Circular, California Beef Production, now in the process of publication. Until the release of this circular, the information quoted, in part, here is available only in the limited publication of the National Research Council.
An extract from a new Agricultural Extension Service Circular, California Beef Production, now in the process of publication. Until the release of this circular, the information quoted, in part, here is available only in the limited publication of the National Research Council.
It's no longer “just chicken feed”-now a product of scientific nutritional research
by C. R. Grau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It wasn't so very long ago that “chicken feed” meant something of little or no value, some feed that was given to chickens in the hope that eventually a chicken dinner might result. But when you pass off something as “just chicken feed” today, you may not mean what you say.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It wasn't so very long ago that “chicken feed” meant something of little or no value, some feed that was given to chickens in the hope that eventually a chicken dinner might result. But when you pass off something as “just chicken feed” today, you may not mean what you say.
Veterinary scientists prove that one type of mastitis can be controlled successfully
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Research in recent years has demonstrated that at least one form of mastitis can be cured.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Research in recent years has demonstrated that at least one form of mastitis can be cured.
Books for the desk of the farmer
by C. B. Hutchison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In one inclusive volume about soils crops, livestock, and the protection of plants and animals from pests and diseases, the authors—and there are several—trace the history of, and discuss the social and economic development, of California's agriculture from the time of the arrival at San Diego in 1769 of the original cattle herd to the current production of more than 200 commercially important crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In one inclusive volume about soils crops, livestock, and the protection of plants and animals from pests and diseases, the authors—and there are several—trace the history of, and discuss the social and economic development, of California's agriculture from the time of the arrival at San Diego in 1769 of the original cattle herd to the current production of more than 200 commercially important crops.
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December 1946
Volume 1, Number 1

Research articles

New strains of wheat bred by agronomists at Davis increase yields nearly 25 per cent
by Fred N. Briggs
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: The average in wheat yield today in California is almost 25 per cent greater than it was during the four decades prior to the beginning of wheat research work done by the College of Agriculture, in 1904, and practically the entire wheat acreage in the state is planted to varieties which were bred and improved by the Division of Agronomy.
Not available – first paragraph follows: The average in wheat yield today in California is almost 25 per cent greater than it was during the four decades prior to the beginning of wheat research work done by the College of Agriculture, in 1904, and practically the entire wheat acreage in the state is planted to varieties which were bred and improved by the Division of Agronomy.
Army of 23 million wasps is winning fight to control the oriental fruit moth in state
by Glenn L. Finney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: With a record of kills as high as 85 per cent, an army of 23 million has aided in California's battle against the dread Oriental fruit moth.
Not available – first paragraph follows: With a record of kills as high as 85 per cent, an army of 23 million has aided in California's battle against the dread Oriental fruit moth.
Nutrients for beef cattle are outlined
by Editors
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: An extract from a new Agricultural Extension Service Circular, California Beef Production, now in the process of publication. Until the release of this circular, the information quoted, in part, here is available only in the limited publication of the National Research Council.
An extract from a new Agricultural Extension Service Circular, California Beef Production, now in the process of publication. Until the release of this circular, the information quoted, in part, here is available only in the limited publication of the National Research Council.
It's no longer “just chicken feed”-now a product of scientific nutritional research
by C. R. Grau
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: It wasn't so very long ago that “chicken feed” meant something of little or no value, some feed that was given to chickens in the hope that eventually a chicken dinner might result. But when you pass off something as “just chicken feed” today, you may not mean what you say.
Not available – first paragraph follows: It wasn't so very long ago that “chicken feed” meant something of little or no value, some feed that was given to chickens in the hope that eventually a chicken dinner might result. But when you pass off something as “just chicken feed” today, you may not mean what you say.
Veterinary scientists prove that one type of mastitis can be controlled successfully
by O. W. Schalm
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: Research in recent years has demonstrated that at least one form of mastitis can be cured.
Not available – first paragraph follows: Research in recent years has demonstrated that at least one form of mastitis can be cured.
Books for the desk of the farmer
by C. B. Hutchison
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Not available – first paragraph follows: In one inclusive volume about soils crops, livestock, and the protection of plants and animals from pests and diseases, the authors—and there are several—trace the history of, and discuss the social and economic development, of California's agriculture from the time of the arrival at San Diego in 1769 of the original cattle herd to the current production of more than 200 commercially important crops.
Not available – first paragraph follows: In one inclusive volume about soils crops, livestock, and the protection of plants and animals from pests and diseases, the authors—and there are several—trace the history of, and discuss the social and economic development, of California's agriculture from the time of the arrival at San Diego in 1769 of the original cattle herd to the current production of more than 200 commercially important crops.

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