California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.11

Strawberry research at the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose, includes projects on varieties, diseases, insects, and dates of planting.
November 1965
Volume 19, Number 11

Research articles

Turfgrass irrigation: By Tensiometer-Controlled System
by W. C. Morgan, A. W. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tensiometers can be used successfully to determine frequency and duration of turfgrass irrigations, according to the trials reported here on three established golf greens. Whether irrigation systems are manually controlled and merely guided by tensiometer readings, or completely automatic with tensiometers connected to a time-control system, this device—properly used—saves both time and water. Data are also included on tensiometers buried at two depths rather than one, and special emphasis is placed on the importance of even distribution of water from the sprinklers, a thatch control program, and regular soil cultivation with a mechanical aerifier to reduce the effects of soil compaction.
Potassium-Magnesium: Interrelationships in Cotton
by A. L. Page, F. T. Bingham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
recent field experiments have demonstrated that certain soils in the San Joaquin Valley need to be fertilized with heavy applications of potassium (K) o obtain maximum production. The question of what effect these high K additions have on the nutritional status of 3ther plant-essential elements for cotton has never been answered, but K-induced magnesium (Mg) deficiencies had been demonstrated for a number of crops by previous investigators. A greenhouse experiment to evaluate the effect of K on the Mg status of the cotton plant, under California conditions, was conducted at Riverside. Distinct K- and Mg-deficiency symptoms, along with the associated plant tissue analyses, were developed.
recent field experiments have demonstrated that certain soils in the San Joaquin Valley need to be fertilized with heavy applications of potassium (K) o obtain maximum production. The question of what effect these high K additions have on the nutritional status of 3ther plant-essential elements for cotton has never been answered, but K-induced magnesium (Mg) deficiencies had been demonstrated for a number of crops by previous investigators. A greenhouse experiment to evaluate the effect of K on the Mg status of the cotton plant, under California conditions, was conducted at Riverside. Distinct K- and Mg-deficiency symptoms, along with the associated plant tissue analyses, were developed.
B-nine: Fall sprays delay bloom and increase fruit set on bartlett pears
by W. H. Griggs, B. T. Iwakiri, R. S. Bethell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experimental treatments in the fall with sprays of the growth-retarding compound, “B-Nine,” provided an effective and apparently safe means of delaying bloom in Bartlett pears to avoid loss due to late spring frosts. The delay in bloom resulted in increased fruit set. Shoot growth was delayed, but the total amount was not significantly reduced. Pears that developed on the sprayed trees had shorter and thicker stems, but storage, ripening and flavor qualities were not adversely affected. This chemical has not been approved for use on pears at this time.
Flower Beds in Public Places
by R. M. Sachs, Jack Debie, Marion Stephens
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Garden flowers in public places can be as rewarding as any wildflower display of the desert, range, or alpine meadow. A few municipalities have had excellent experience with flower beds and maintain many, relatively small, plantings of herbaceous flowering materials under continuous cultivation. Small beds, planted to one or two species, make quite impressive displays. Although maintenance of flower beds and herbaceous materials is somewhat more difficult and costly than that for trees and shrubs, some problems have been exaggerated. This report on three successive years of trials with 50 species at Davis provides additional details to other information already available on maintenance costs, species selection, planting date, density, and useful life of plantings.
Bloom Spraying with Gibberellin Loosens Clusters of Thompson Seedless Grapes
by R. J. Weaver, R. M. Pool
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Applications of gibberellin to Thompson Seedless grapes during bloom produce a very loose cluster. Loose clusters may be less subject to summer bunch rot and are easier to pack than the more compact cluster often produced by the commercially accepted practice of spraying following bloom.

General Information

Deciduous Fruit Field Station
by San Jose
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 19, No.11

Strawberry research at the Deciduous Fruit Field Station, San Jose, includes projects on varieties, diseases, insects, and dates of planting.
November 1965
Volume 19, Number 11

Research articles

Turfgrass irrigation: By Tensiometer-Controlled System
by W. C. Morgan, A. W. Marsh
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Tensiometers can be used successfully to determine frequency and duration of turfgrass irrigations, according to the trials reported here on three established golf greens. Whether irrigation systems are manually controlled and merely guided by tensiometer readings, or completely automatic with tensiometers connected to a time-control system, this device—properly used—saves both time and water. Data are also included on tensiometers buried at two depths rather than one, and special emphasis is placed on the importance of even distribution of water from the sprinklers, a thatch control program, and regular soil cultivation with a mechanical aerifier to reduce the effects of soil compaction.
Potassium-Magnesium: Interrelationships in Cotton
by A. L. Page, F. T. Bingham
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
recent field experiments have demonstrated that certain soils in the San Joaquin Valley need to be fertilized with heavy applications of potassium (K) o obtain maximum production. The question of what effect these high K additions have on the nutritional status of 3ther plant-essential elements for cotton has never been answered, but K-induced magnesium (Mg) deficiencies had been demonstrated for a number of crops by previous investigators. A greenhouse experiment to evaluate the effect of K on the Mg status of the cotton plant, under California conditions, was conducted at Riverside. Distinct K- and Mg-deficiency symptoms, along with the associated plant tissue analyses, were developed.
recent field experiments have demonstrated that certain soils in the San Joaquin Valley need to be fertilized with heavy applications of potassium (K) o obtain maximum production. The question of what effect these high K additions have on the nutritional status of 3ther plant-essential elements for cotton has never been answered, but K-induced magnesium (Mg) deficiencies had been demonstrated for a number of crops by previous investigators. A greenhouse experiment to evaluate the effect of K on the Mg status of the cotton plant, under California conditions, was conducted at Riverside. Distinct K- and Mg-deficiency symptoms, along with the associated plant tissue analyses, were developed.
B-nine: Fall sprays delay bloom and increase fruit set on bartlett pears
by W. H. Griggs, B. T. Iwakiri, R. S. Bethell
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Experimental treatments in the fall with sprays of the growth-retarding compound, “B-Nine,” provided an effective and apparently safe means of delaying bloom in Bartlett pears to avoid loss due to late spring frosts. The delay in bloom resulted in increased fruit set. Shoot growth was delayed, but the total amount was not significantly reduced. Pears that developed on the sprayed trees had shorter and thicker stems, but storage, ripening and flavor qualities were not adversely affected. This chemical has not been approved for use on pears at this time.
Flower Beds in Public Places
by R. M. Sachs, Jack Debie, Marion Stephens
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Garden flowers in public places can be as rewarding as any wildflower display of the desert, range, or alpine meadow. A few municipalities have had excellent experience with flower beds and maintain many, relatively small, plantings of herbaceous flowering materials under continuous cultivation. Small beds, planted to one or two species, make quite impressive displays. Although maintenance of flower beds and herbaceous materials is somewhat more difficult and costly than that for trees and shrubs, some problems have been exaggerated. This report on three successive years of trials with 50 species at Davis provides additional details to other information already available on maintenance costs, species selection, planting date, density, and useful life of plantings.
Bloom Spraying with Gibberellin Loosens Clusters of Thompson Seedless Grapes
by R. J. Weaver, R. M. Pool
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Applications of gibberellin to Thompson Seedless grapes during bloom produce a very loose cluster. Loose clusters may be less subject to summer bunch rot and are easier to pack than the more compact cluster often produced by the commercially accepted practice of spraying following bloom.

General Information

Deciduous Fruit Field Station
by San Jose
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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