California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

October 1965
Volume 19, Number 10

Research articles

Controlling: Ceratocystis canker of stone fruit trees
by J. E. Devay, F. L. Lukezic, W. H. English, W. J. Moller, B. W. Parkinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Ceratocystis canker disease in stone fruit orchards can be prevented or controlled by wise use of mechanical harvesting equipment and by canker surgery. A new mercurial wound dressing developed by University of California researchers has been registered by the USDA for use on bark wounds of almond and prune trees. Recent discoveries concerning the associations between various insects and the fungus, Ceratocystis fimbriata, have helped to explain not only the rapid spread of this disease in orchards, but also the role of soil moisture in its development.
Milk flavor unaffected by Plastic Baler Twine
by T. A. Nickerson, R. L. Baldwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Consumption of significant quantities of shredded plastic (polypropylene) baler twine had no effect on animal performance or milk flavor, in this short-term trial with dairy cattle.
New Low Intensity Ultraviolet Light Trap For Detection of Codling Moth Activity
by M. M. Barnes, M. J. Wargo, R. L. Baldwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
timing of insecticide sprays can be improved if direct information is available on insect activity in crop plantings. In apple, pear, and walnut orchards, detection of the activity of the adult stage of the codling moth is required for optimum use of insecticides. Many insecticides used for codling moth control are most effective for direct and residual action against the moth stage, but knowledge of moth activity is important regardless of the stage of the insect against which the insecticide is effective.
timing of insecticide sprays can be improved if direct information is available on insect activity in crop plantings. In apple, pear, and walnut orchards, detection of the activity of the adult stage of the codling moth is required for optimum use of insecticides. Many insecticides used for codling moth control are most effective for direct and residual action against the moth stage, but knowledge of moth activity is important regardless of the stage of the insect against which the insecticide is effective.
The present status of … Housefly Resistance to Insecticides … in california
by G. P. Georghiou, W. R. Bowen, E. C. Loomis, A. S. Deal
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Resistance to insecticides varies with diferent fly species, areas, and materials used, but flies have been able to survive and eventually build up resistant populations despite any insecticide used to date. Resistance to new compounds appears to develop even more rapidly where flies are already resistant to an earlier used compound. Well known fly control methods including good manure management and general farm sanitation in essential as a means of reducing the need for frequent insecticide applications and thus delaying the development of resistance.
Investigations of processes in Avocado fruit ripening
by E. Bogin, A. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fruits of most avocado varieties do not soften while still on the tree. Softening of picked fruit, with an accompanying increase of oxygen uptake, can be speeded by supplying chemicals to inhibit respiration of the fruit. In contrast, softening was delayed in these tests by supplying a preparation of unknown composition obtained from a bacterium grown anaerobically in a sucrose solution.
Germplasm available for new flax varieties …: With different types of oil
by D. M. Yermanos, S. C. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Flax-breeding efforts in the past have been directed toward varieties with high linolenic acid content required by paint manufacturers to impart quick-drying qualities to linseed oil. To develop new varieties with oil suitable for other industrial uses and possible use in the human diet, over 1,500 cultivated flax strains and 35 wild species were collected, screened, and analyzed by the Department of Agronomy, University of California, Riverside.
Irrigation Pumping Lifts in the San Joaquin Valley
by C. V. Moore, J. H. Snyder
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Continued groundwater use at rates in excess of natural recharge to the ground-water basins has caused significant overdrafts in some areas of the San Joaquin Valley. This study points out the need for careful consideration of pumping unit efficiency and water costs per acre-foot, per foot of lift. Farmers in areas of highly unstable pumping lifts may need to look for supplemental irrigation water or to reorganize their systems of farming.
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October 1965
Volume 19, Number 10

Research articles

Controlling: Ceratocystis canker of stone fruit trees
by J. E. Devay, F. L. Lukezic, W. H. English, W. J. Moller, B. W. Parkinson
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Ceratocystis canker disease in stone fruit orchards can be prevented or controlled by wise use of mechanical harvesting equipment and by canker surgery. A new mercurial wound dressing developed by University of California researchers has been registered by the USDA for use on bark wounds of almond and prune trees. Recent discoveries concerning the associations between various insects and the fungus, Ceratocystis fimbriata, have helped to explain not only the rapid spread of this disease in orchards, but also the role of soil moisture in its development.
Milk flavor unaffected by Plastic Baler Twine
by T. A. Nickerson, R. L. Baldwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Consumption of significant quantities of shredded plastic (polypropylene) baler twine had no effect on animal performance or milk flavor, in this short-term trial with dairy cattle.
New Low Intensity Ultraviolet Light Trap For Detection of Codling Moth Activity
by M. M. Barnes, M. J. Wargo, R. L. Baldwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
timing of insecticide sprays can be improved if direct information is available on insect activity in crop plantings. In apple, pear, and walnut orchards, detection of the activity of the adult stage of the codling moth is required for optimum use of insecticides. Many insecticides used for codling moth control are most effective for direct and residual action against the moth stage, but knowledge of moth activity is important regardless of the stage of the insect against which the insecticide is effective.
timing of insecticide sprays can be improved if direct information is available on insect activity in crop plantings. In apple, pear, and walnut orchards, detection of the activity of the adult stage of the codling moth is required for optimum use of insecticides. Many insecticides used for codling moth control are most effective for direct and residual action against the moth stage, but knowledge of moth activity is important regardless of the stage of the insect against which the insecticide is effective.
The present status of … Housefly Resistance to Insecticides … in california
by G. P. Georghiou, W. R. Bowen, E. C. Loomis, A. S. Deal
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Resistance to insecticides varies with diferent fly species, areas, and materials used, but flies have been able to survive and eventually build up resistant populations despite any insecticide used to date. Resistance to new compounds appears to develop even more rapidly where flies are already resistant to an earlier used compound. Well known fly control methods including good manure management and general farm sanitation in essential as a means of reducing the need for frequent insecticide applications and thus delaying the development of resistance.
Investigations of processes in Avocado fruit ripening
by E. Bogin, A. Wallace
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Fruits of most avocado varieties do not soften while still on the tree. Softening of picked fruit, with an accompanying increase of oxygen uptake, can be speeded by supplying chemicals to inhibit respiration of the fruit. In contrast, softening was delayed in these tests by supplying a preparation of unknown composition obtained from a bacterium grown anaerobically in a sucrose solution.
Germplasm available for new flax varieties …: With different types of oil
by D. M. Yermanos, S. C. Hemstreet
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Flax-breeding efforts in the past have been directed toward varieties with high linolenic acid content required by paint manufacturers to impart quick-drying qualities to linseed oil. To develop new varieties with oil suitable for other industrial uses and possible use in the human diet, over 1,500 cultivated flax strains and 35 wild species were collected, screened, and analyzed by the Department of Agronomy, University of California, Riverside.
Irrigation Pumping Lifts in the San Joaquin Valley
by C. V. Moore, J. H. Snyder
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Continued groundwater use at rates in excess of natural recharge to the ground-water basins has caused significant overdrafts in some areas of the San Joaquin Valley. This study points out the need for careful consideration of pumping unit efficiency and water costs per acre-foot, per foot of lift. Farmers in areas of highly unstable pumping lifts may need to look for supplemental irrigation water or to reorganize their systems of farming.

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