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California Agriculture, Vol. 17, No.9

Antelope Valley Field Station
September 1963
Volume 17, Number 9

Research articles

Low intake rates and rising perched water tables hinder ground water recharge in Southwestern Fresno County
by E. E. Haskell, W. C. Bianchi, C. R. Pomeroy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Farmlands OF southwestern Fresno County are in great need of ground water recharge. Most irrigation pumping occurs from below a confining layer of diatomaceous clay, 500 to 700 feet below the ground surface. However, a shallow water table is perched on layers of heavy-textured sedimental soils occurring 75 to 100 feet below all the experimental locations. This zone of water is not pumped for irrigation purposes at present because of high salinity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Farmlands OF southwestern Fresno County are in great need of ground water recharge. Most irrigation pumping occurs from below a confining layer of diatomaceous clay, 500 to 700 feet below the ground surface. However, a shallow water table is perched on layers of heavy-textured sedimental soils occurring 75 to 100 feet below all the experimental locations. This zone of water is not pumped for irrigation purposes at present because of high salinity.
Interplanting methods for wind erosion protection in San Joaquin asparagus
by H. B. Schultz, A. B. Carlton, F. Lory
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An alternate method for analyzing the effectiveness of wind erosion protection in asparagus fields of the San Joaquin Delta peat regions substantiated previous results proving the value of the practice of interplanting barley in every row, and showed success with alternate row planting mainly when done perpendicular to the critical winds.
An alternate method for analyzing the effectiveness of wind erosion protection in asparagus fields of the San Joaquin Delta peat regions substantiated previous results proving the value of the practice of interplanting barley in every row, and showed success with alternate row planting mainly when done perpendicular to the critical winds.
Rice water temperature
by Franklin Raney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW IRRIGATION WATER TEMPERATURES have already begun to reach problem proportions in the production of certain crops in northern California and may become far more common, especially in the northern parts of the State, as our water storage program progresses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW IRRIGATION WATER TEMPERATURES have already begun to reach problem proportions in the production of certain crops in northern California and may become far more common, especially in the northern parts of the State, as our water storage program progresses.
Walls influence interior radiant environment of: Livestock shelters for shade
by Leroy Hahn, T. E. Bond, C. F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.
Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.
Ethyl alcohol supplement not beneficial to cattle in feedlot tests
by W. N. Garrett, J. H. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This trial was conducted to evaluate observations by a supplier of industrial alcohol indicating the possibility of a beneficial production response when feedlot cattle were given small amounts of ethanol in their water. The experiment was conducted for a 105-day period from July through October in 1962. Four pens of three Hereford steers received an identical ration with two pens (six steers) receiving alcohol in the water at a concentration providing 8 oz. of denatured ethanol per head daily. Dispensing apparatus was a 100-gallon tank supplied with a float valve and a small, 8 × 8 × 2-inch drinking pan to minimize evaporation. Water and the ethanol were added to the tank daily. Similar drinkers used in control pens were equipped with water meters to record water consumption.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: This trial was conducted to evaluate observations by a supplier of industrial alcohol indicating the possibility of a beneficial production response when feedlot cattle were given small amounts of ethanol in their water. The experiment was conducted for a 105-day period from July through October in 1962. Four pens of three Hereford steers received an identical ration with two pens (six steers) receiving alcohol in the water at a concentration providing 8 oz. of denatured ethanol per head daily. Dispensing apparatus was a 100-gallon tank supplied with a float valve and a small, 8 × 8 × 2-inch drinking pan to minimize evaporation. Water and the ethanol were added to the tank daily. Similar drinkers used in control pens were equipped with water meters to record water consumption.
New growth regulator possibility: Kinins stimulate grape growth
by R. J. Weaver, J. Van Overbeek
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Experimental treatments with a new “kinin” growth regulator resulted in berry size increases three times normal in Black Corinth grapes at Davis. Kinins (pronounced ky-nins) are one of the three main groups of plant growth hormones, but are not as well known as the already proven auxins and gibberellins. Kinins are capable of being taken into plant tissues where, among other things, they promote protein synthesis. They have already proven their ability to extend the after-harvest shelf life and freshness of vegetables, and one patented kinin product is now being developed as Verdan® Senescence Inhibitor.
Experimental treatments with a new “kinin” growth regulator resulted in berry size increases three times normal in Black Corinth grapes at Davis. Kinins (pronounced ky-nins) are one of the three main groups of plant growth hormones, but are not as well known as the already proven auxins and gibberellins. Kinins are capable of being taken into plant tissues where, among other things, they promote protein synthesis. They have already proven their ability to extend the after-harvest shelf life and freshness of vegetables, and one patented kinin product is now being developed as Verdan® Senescence Inhibitor.
Control of: Cantaloupe powdery mildew
by Larry Bruscia, Albert O. Paulus, J. Hara
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of powdery mildew of cantaloupe was obtained by using the recommended rate of 3/4 pound Karathane wettable powder (25%) per acre applied as a spray, in Palo Verde Valley tests, Riverside County, in 1961.
Excellent control of powdery mildew of cantaloupe was obtained by using the recommended rate of 3/4 pound Karathane wettable powder (25%) per acre applied as a spray, in Palo Verde Valley tests, Riverside County, in 1961.
Slow release fertilizers: For poinsettia pot plants
by A. M. Kofranek, T. G. Byrne, R. H. Sciaroni, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: POINSETTIA pot plants must be grown under relatively moist conditions and with a relatively high supply of nutrients to produce a quality flower. Growers start plants in July or August for sale during the Christmas season. During this four- or five-month period, the plants may be irrigated with as much as 100 inches of water, making the maintenance of fertility levels difficult. Irrigation water is sometimes used to maintain fertility, but not all growers have liquid fertilizer equipment. Newly developed slow-release fertilizers are especially adaptable for high value ornamental crops, such as poinsettias, to provide the mineral nutrients over a prolonged period of time.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: POINSETTIA pot plants must be grown under relatively moist conditions and with a relatively high supply of nutrients to produce a quality flower. Growers start plants in July or August for sale during the Christmas season. During this four- or five-month period, the plants may be irrigated with as much as 100 inches of water, making the maintenance of fertility levels difficult. Irrigation water is sometimes used to maintain fertility, but not all growers have liquid fertilizer equipment. Newly developed slow-release fertilizers are especially adaptable for high value ornamental crops, such as poinsettias, to provide the mineral nutrients over a prolonged period of time.

General Information

Antelope Valley Field Station
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

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California Agriculture, Vol. 17, No.9

Antelope Valley Field Station
September 1963
Volume 17, Number 9

Research articles

Low intake rates and rising perched water tables hinder ground water recharge in Southwestern Fresno County
by E. E. Haskell, W. C. Bianchi, C. R. Pomeroy
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Farmlands OF southwestern Fresno County are in great need of ground water recharge. Most irrigation pumping occurs from below a confining layer of diatomaceous clay, 500 to 700 feet below the ground surface. However, a shallow water table is perched on layers of heavy-textured sedimental soils occurring 75 to 100 feet below all the experimental locations. This zone of water is not pumped for irrigation purposes at present because of high salinity.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Farmlands OF southwestern Fresno County are in great need of ground water recharge. Most irrigation pumping occurs from below a confining layer of diatomaceous clay, 500 to 700 feet below the ground surface. However, a shallow water table is perched on layers of heavy-textured sedimental soils occurring 75 to 100 feet below all the experimental locations. This zone of water is not pumped for irrigation purposes at present because of high salinity.
Interplanting methods for wind erosion protection in San Joaquin asparagus
by H. B. Schultz, A. B. Carlton, F. Lory
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: An alternate method for analyzing the effectiveness of wind erosion protection in asparagus fields of the San Joaquin Delta peat regions substantiated previous results proving the value of the practice of interplanting barley in every row, and showed success with alternate row planting mainly when done perpendicular to the critical winds.
An alternate method for analyzing the effectiveness of wind erosion protection in asparagus fields of the San Joaquin Delta peat regions substantiated previous results proving the value of the practice of interplanting barley in every row, and showed success with alternate row planting mainly when done perpendicular to the critical winds.
Rice water temperature
by Franklin Raney
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW IRRIGATION WATER TEMPERATURES have already begun to reach problem proportions in the production of certain crops in northern California and may become far more common, especially in the northern parts of the State, as our water storage program progresses.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: LOW IRRIGATION WATER TEMPERATURES have already begun to reach problem proportions in the production of certain crops in northern California and may become far more common, especially in the northern parts of the State, as our water storage program progresses.
Walls influence interior radiant environment of: Livestock shelters for shade
by Leroy Hahn, T. E. Bond, C. F. Kelly
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.
Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.
Ethyl alcohol supplement not beneficial to cattle in feedlot tests
by W. N. Garrett, J. H. Meyer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: This trial was conducted to evaluate observations by a supplier of industrial alcohol indicating the possibility of a beneficial production response when feedlot cattle were given small amounts of ethanol in their water. The experiment was conducted for a 105-day period from July through October in 1962. Four pens of three Hereford steers received an identical ration with two pens (six steers) receiving alcohol in the water at a concentration providing 8 oz. of denatured ethanol per head daily. Dispensing apparatus was a 100-gallon tank supplied with a float valve and a small, 8 × 8 × 2-inch drinking pan to minimize evaporation. Water and the ethanol were added to the tank daily. Similar drinkers used in control pens were equipped with water meters to record water consumption.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: This trial was conducted to evaluate observations by a supplier of industrial alcohol indicating the possibility of a beneficial production response when feedlot cattle were given small amounts of ethanol in their water. The experiment was conducted for a 105-day period from July through October in 1962. Four pens of three Hereford steers received an identical ration with two pens (six steers) receiving alcohol in the water at a concentration providing 8 oz. of denatured ethanol per head daily. Dispensing apparatus was a 100-gallon tank supplied with a float valve and a small, 8 × 8 × 2-inch drinking pan to minimize evaporation. Water and the ethanol were added to the tank daily. Similar drinkers used in control pens were equipped with water meters to record water consumption.
New growth regulator possibility: Kinins stimulate grape growth
by R. J. Weaver, J. Van Overbeek
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Experimental treatments with a new “kinin” growth regulator resulted in berry size increases three times normal in Black Corinth grapes at Davis. Kinins (pronounced ky-nins) are one of the three main groups of plant growth hormones, but are not as well known as the already proven auxins and gibberellins. Kinins are capable of being taken into plant tissues where, among other things, they promote protein synthesis. They have already proven their ability to extend the after-harvest shelf life and freshness of vegetables, and one patented kinin product is now being developed as Verdan® Senescence Inhibitor.
Experimental treatments with a new “kinin” growth regulator resulted in berry size increases three times normal in Black Corinth grapes at Davis. Kinins (pronounced ky-nins) are one of the three main groups of plant growth hormones, but are not as well known as the already proven auxins and gibberellins. Kinins are capable of being taken into plant tissues where, among other things, they promote protein synthesis. They have already proven their ability to extend the after-harvest shelf life and freshness of vegetables, and one patented kinin product is now being developed as Verdan® Senescence Inhibitor.
Control of: Cantaloupe powdery mildew
by Larry Bruscia, Albert O. Paulus, J. Hara
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Excellent control of powdery mildew of cantaloupe was obtained by using the recommended rate of 3/4 pound Karathane wettable powder (25%) per acre applied as a spray, in Palo Verde Valley tests, Riverside County, in 1961.
Excellent control of powdery mildew of cantaloupe was obtained by using the recommended rate of 3/4 pound Karathane wettable powder (25%) per acre applied as a spray, in Palo Verde Valley tests, Riverside County, in 1961.
Slow release fertilizers: For poinsettia pot plants
by A. M. Kofranek, T. G. Byrne, R. H. Sciaroni, O. R. Lunt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: POINSETTIA pot plants must be grown under relatively moist conditions and with a relatively high supply of nutrients to produce a quality flower. Growers start plants in July or August for sale during the Christmas season. During this four- or five-month period, the plants may be irrigated with as much as 100 inches of water, making the maintenance of fertility levels difficult. Irrigation water is sometimes used to maintain fertility, but not all growers have liquid fertilizer equipment. Newly developed slow-release fertilizers are especially adaptable for high value ornamental crops, such as poinsettias, to provide the mineral nutrients over a prolonged period of time.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: POINSETTIA pot plants must be grown under relatively moist conditions and with a relatively high supply of nutrients to produce a quality flower. Growers start plants in July or August for sale during the Christmas season. During this four- or five-month period, the plants may be irrigated with as much as 100 inches of water, making the maintenance of fertility levels difficult. Irrigation water is sometimes used to maintain fertility, but not all growers have liquid fertilizer equipment. Newly developed slow-release fertilizers are especially adaptable for high value ornamental crops, such as poinsettias, to provide the mineral nutrients over a prolonged period of time.

General Information

Antelope Valley Field Station
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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