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Walls influence interior radiant environment of: Livestock shelters for shade

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Authors

Leroy Hahn
T. E. Bond
C. F. Kelly

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(9):10-11.

Published September 01, 1963

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Abstract

Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.

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Author notes

This was a cooperative investigation between the Agricultural Engineering Research Division, ARS, USDA, and the U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station.

Walls influence interior radiant environment of: Livestock shelters for shade

Leroy Hahn, T. E. Bond, C. F. Kelly
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Walls influence interior radiant environment of: Livestock shelters for shade

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Leroy Hahn
T. E. Bond
C. F. Kelly

Publication Information

California Agriculture 17(9):10-11.

Published September 01, 1963

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Placing a simple shade over an animal exposed to a hot environment and direct radiant energy from the sun, cuts the radiation heat load on that animal about 45%. Addition of one wall caused an additional 5% reduction, and each additional wall (up to three) caused an additional 2% reduction—making a total reduction in radiation heat load resulting from a three-sided shelter of about 54%, according to this report of Davis tests.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This was a cooperative investigation between the Agricultural Engineering Research Division, ARS, USDA, and the U.C. Agricultural Experiment Station.


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