California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.9

Experimental prune harvester uses pulsating blower-shaker
September 1961
Volume 15, Number 9

Research articles

Field tests show feasibility of blower-shaker for mechanical harvesting of prunes
by H. L. Brewer, R. B. Fridley, P. A. Adrian
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pulsating air as a means of shaking the limbs of prune trees is a feasible method of harvesting with catching frames.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pulsating air as a means of shaking the limbs of prune trees is a feasible method of harvesting with catching frames.
Distribution and control of cotton boll rots in California cotton growing areas
by P. M. Halisky, W. C. Schnathorst, D. C. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Each year the California cotton crop suffers quality reduction and yield losses —estimated at 3.5% to 4.0%—due to fungus boll-rotting organisms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Each year the California cotton crop suffers quality reduction and yield losses —estimated at 3.5% to 4.0%—due to fungus boll-rotting organisms.
Characteristics of the demand structure for standing timber and logs in the Central Sierra Nevada region
by Dennis E. Teeguarden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research on the characteristics of the market for standing timber—stumpage—and logs from small woodlands of less than 5,000 acres, was started in 1957 in the forested portions of El Dorado, Placer, and Nevada counties west of the Sierra Nevada summit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research on the characteristics of the market for standing timber—stumpage—and logs from small woodlands of less than 5,000 acres, was started in 1957 in the forested portions of El Dorado, Placer, and Nevada counties west of the Sierra Nevada summit.
Experimental acaricides tested for control of spider mites on field corn on two San Joaquin Delta islands
by O. G. Bacon, J. E. Swift, R. S. Baskett, Torrey Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spider mites attack field corn in most corn growing areas of California. In the interior valleys, and especially in the San Joaquin Delta region, the mite populations become so abundant in some years that they may cause premature drying of the foliage.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spider mites attack field corn in most corn growing areas of California. In the interior valleys, and especially in the San Joaquin Delta region, the mite populations become so abundant in some years that they may cause premature drying of the foliage.
Orchard and plant management affect control of navel orangeworm on walnuts in northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, Clarence S. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: No effective spray program against the navel orangeworm—Pararnyehis transitella (Walker)—has been perfected. Therefore, control is dependent on orchard and plant management because the insect, primarily a scavenger, is capable of attacking sound walnuts after the husks have cracked.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: No effective spray program against the navel orangeworm—Pararnyehis transitella (Walker)—has been perfected. Therefore, control is dependent on orchard and plant management because the insect, primarily a scavenger, is capable of attacking sound walnuts after the husks have cracked.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Lemon tree decline
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil disinfestants
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Onion hybrids
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Gibberellin and abscission
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Heat, moisture transfer
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potato nutrition
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.9

Experimental prune harvester uses pulsating blower-shaker
September 1961
Volume 15, Number 9

Research articles

Field tests show feasibility of blower-shaker for mechanical harvesting of prunes
by H. L. Brewer, R. B. Fridley, P. A. Adrian
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pulsating air as a means of shaking the limbs of prune trees is a feasible method of harvesting with catching frames.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Pulsating air as a means of shaking the limbs of prune trees is a feasible method of harvesting with catching frames.
Distribution and control of cotton boll rots in California cotton growing areas
by P. M. Halisky, W. C. Schnathorst, D. C. Erwin
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Each year the California cotton crop suffers quality reduction and yield losses —estimated at 3.5% to 4.0%—due to fungus boll-rotting organisms.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Each year the California cotton crop suffers quality reduction and yield losses —estimated at 3.5% to 4.0%—due to fungus boll-rotting organisms.
Characteristics of the demand structure for standing timber and logs in the Central Sierra Nevada region
by Dennis E. Teeguarden
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research on the characteristics of the market for standing timber—stumpage—and logs from small woodlands of less than 5,000 acres, was started in 1957 in the forested portions of El Dorado, Placer, and Nevada counties west of the Sierra Nevada summit.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Research on the characteristics of the market for standing timber—stumpage—and logs from small woodlands of less than 5,000 acres, was started in 1957 in the forested portions of El Dorado, Placer, and Nevada counties west of the Sierra Nevada summit.
Experimental acaricides tested for control of spider mites on field corn on two San Joaquin Delta islands
by O. G. Bacon, J. E. Swift, R. S. Baskett, Torrey Lyons
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spider mites attack field corn in most corn growing areas of California. In the interior valleys, and especially in the San Joaquin Delta region, the mite populations become so abundant in some years that they may cause premature drying of the foliage.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Spider mites attack field corn in most corn growing areas of California. In the interior valleys, and especially in the San Joaquin Delta region, the mite populations become so abundant in some years that they may cause premature drying of the foliage.
Orchard and plant management affect control of navel orangeworm on walnuts in northern California
by A. E. Michelbacher, Clarence S. Davis
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: No effective spray program against the navel orangeworm—Pararnyehis transitella (Walker)—has been perfected. Therefore, control is dependent on orchard and plant management because the insect, primarily a scavenger, is capable of attacking sound walnuts after the husks have cracked.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: No effective spray program against the navel orangeworm—Pararnyehis transitella (Walker)—has been perfected. Therefore, control is dependent on orchard and plant management because the insect, primarily a scavenger, is capable of attacking sound walnuts after the husks have cracked.

Editorial, News, Letters and Science Briefs

Lemon tree decline
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Soil disinfestants
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Onion hybrids
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Gibberellin and abscission
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Heat, moisture transfer
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  
Potato nutrition
by Editors
Full text HTML  | PDF  

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