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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.10

Wanted . . . Citrus Bud Variants
October 1961
Volume 15, Number 10

Research articles

Downy mildew on spinach: A second race of fungus has been found on Califlay variety in the coastal valley area of California
by Paul G. Smith, R. E. Webb, Archie M. Millett, Carl H. Luhn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years downy mildew—blue mold—on spinach has caused serious losses to growers and processors wherever spinach is grown. In a search for resistance, two primitive weedy spinach strains from Iran were found to be completely immune to the disease.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years downy mildew—blue mold—on spinach has caused serious losses to growers and processors wherever spinach is grown. In a search for resistance, two primitive weedy spinach strains from Iran were found to be completely immune to the disease.
Wetting agents: Can increase water infiltration or retard it, depending on soil conditions and water contact angle
by J. Letey, R. E. Pelishek, J. Osborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wetting agents are being marketed as means of increasing water infiltration of soil. At present no recommendation either for or against their use in irrigation water can be made that will cover every soil condition. However, certain effects of wetting agents on water entry are known, and these indicate conditions under which wetting agents are most likely to be beneficial.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wetting agents are being marketed as means of increasing water infiltration of soil. At present no recommendation either for or against their use in irrigation water can be made that will cover every soil condition. However, certain effects of wetting agents on water entry are known, and these indicate conditions under which wetting agents are most likely to be beneficial.
Soil nutrients after brush burning: Tests with greenhouse plants show that burning increases supply of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil
by J. Vlamis, K. D. Gowans
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A program of brushland conversion from chaparral cover to the more useful cover of grass and clover has been in progress in California for several years. In many situations, prescribed burning is used to accelerate brush disposal. Because of the hazards involved, prescribed burning is performed under specified conditions of temperature, humidity, season of the year, and with approved fire-crew supervision.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A program of brushland conversion from chaparral cover to the more useful cover of grass and clover has been in progress in California for several years. In many situations, prescribed burning is used to accelerate brush disposal. Because of the hazards involved, prescribed burning is performed under specified conditions of temperature, humidity, season of the year, and with approved fire-crew supervision.
Old home pear: Is proving valuable as a rootstock in combating pear decline and fire blight
by William H. Griggs, Hudson T. Hartmann, A. A. Millecan, Carl J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Old Home pear variety is resistant to fire blight and pear decline, has a well-shaped trunk, a good scaffold system, and is easily propagated on its own roots by hardwood cuttings. For these reasons, Old Home stock is expected to be of even greater value to the pear industry in the future than it has been in the past.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Old Home pear variety is resistant to fire blight and pear decline, has a well-shaped trunk, a good scaffold system, and is easily propagated on its own roots by hardwood cuttings. For these reasons, Old Home stock is expected to be of even greater value to the pear industry in the future than it has been in the past.
Wanted… citrus bud variants: New citrus varieties are needed to fill a marketing gap; a variant in your grove might be the answer
by R. G. Platt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Attention has recently been focused on bud variations in standard citrus varieties. This has been brought about largely by the occurrence and recognition of variants which have had one or more undesirable characteristic from the standpoint of what is recognized as typical and desirable fruit of each variety.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Attention has recently been focused on bud variations in standard citrus varieties. This has been brought about largely by the occurrence and recognition of variants which have had one or more undesirable characteristic from the standpoint of what is recognized as typical and desirable fruit of each variety.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.10

Wanted . . . Citrus Bud Variants
October 1961
Volume 15, Number 10

Research articles

Downy mildew on spinach: A second race of fungus has been found on Califlay variety in the coastal valley area of California
by Paul G. Smith, R. E. Webb, Archie M. Millett, Carl H. Luhn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years downy mildew—blue mold—on spinach has caused serious losses to growers and processors wherever spinach is grown. In a search for resistance, two primitive weedy spinach strains from Iran were found to be completely immune to the disease.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: For many years downy mildew—blue mold—on spinach has caused serious losses to growers and processors wherever spinach is grown. In a search for resistance, two primitive weedy spinach strains from Iran were found to be completely immune to the disease.
Wetting agents: Can increase water infiltration or retard it, depending on soil conditions and water contact angle
by J. Letey, R. E. Pelishek, J. Osborn
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wetting agents are being marketed as means of increasing water infiltration of soil. At present no recommendation either for or against their use in irrigation water can be made that will cover every soil condition. However, certain effects of wetting agents on water entry are known, and these indicate conditions under which wetting agents are most likely to be beneficial.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wetting agents are being marketed as means of increasing water infiltration of soil. At present no recommendation either for or against their use in irrigation water can be made that will cover every soil condition. However, certain effects of wetting agents on water entry are known, and these indicate conditions under which wetting agents are most likely to be beneficial.
Soil nutrients after brush burning: Tests with greenhouse plants show that burning increases supply of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil
by J. Vlamis, K. D. Gowans
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A program of brushland conversion from chaparral cover to the more useful cover of grass and clover has been in progress in California for several years. In many situations, prescribed burning is used to accelerate brush disposal. Because of the hazards involved, prescribed burning is performed under specified conditions of temperature, humidity, season of the year, and with approved fire-crew supervision.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A program of brushland conversion from chaparral cover to the more useful cover of grass and clover has been in progress in California for several years. In many situations, prescribed burning is used to accelerate brush disposal. Because of the hazards involved, prescribed burning is performed under specified conditions of temperature, humidity, season of the year, and with approved fire-crew supervision.
Old home pear: Is proving valuable as a rootstock in combating pear decline and fire blight
by William H. Griggs, Hudson T. Hartmann, A. A. Millecan, Carl J. Hansen
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Old Home pear variety is resistant to fire blight and pear decline, has a well-shaped trunk, a good scaffold system, and is easily propagated on its own roots by hardwood cuttings. For these reasons, Old Home stock is expected to be of even greater value to the pear industry in the future than it has been in the past.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Old Home pear variety is resistant to fire blight and pear decline, has a well-shaped trunk, a good scaffold system, and is easily propagated on its own roots by hardwood cuttings. For these reasons, Old Home stock is expected to be of even greater value to the pear industry in the future than it has been in the past.
Wanted… citrus bud variants: New citrus varieties are needed to fill a marketing gap; a variant in your grove might be the answer
by R. G. Platt
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Attention has recently been focused on bud variations in standard citrus varieties. This has been brought about largely by the occurrence and recognition of variants which have had one or more undesirable characteristic from the standpoint of what is recognized as typical and desirable fruit of each variety.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Attention has recently been focused on bud variations in standard citrus varieties. This has been brought about largely by the occurrence and recognition of variants which have had one or more undesirable characteristic from the standpoint of what is recognized as typical and desirable fruit of each variety.

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