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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.1

Balance of soil moisture to meet plant growth requirements
January 1961
Volume 15, Number 1

Research articles

Climatic limitations on plant growth evaluated by balancing soil moisture against evaporation and transpiration
by Rodney J. Arkley, Rudolph Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crop selection and soil management practices can be based on accurate estimates of evapotranspiration—water loss from the soil by direct evaporation and by plant transpiration—derived from climatic analysis. Growth of crop plants is dependent on the three major factors of soil, climate and management. Soil and management have been studied more thoroughly and are better understood than the factor of climate.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crop selection and soil management practices can be based on accurate estimates of evapotranspiration—water loss from the soil by direct evaporation and by plant transpiration—derived from climatic analysis. Growth of crop plants is dependent on the three major factors of soil, climate and management. Soil and management have been studied more thoroughly and are better understood than the factor of climate.
New California pest sorghum midge found in San Joaquin Valley
by W. H. Lange, V. L. Marble, W. E. Pendery, V. E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The sorghum midge—Contarinia sor-ghicola (Coquillet)—the most important pest of grain sorghums in the Southern states—was found in Tulare county on October 6, 1960. This apparently is the first record of this midge west of New Mexico. Surveys at the time of the initial discovery indicate that it is firmly established in Tulare County and is also present in Madera, Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The sorghum midge—Contarinia sor-ghicola (Coquillet)—the most important pest of grain sorghums in the Southern states—was found in Tulare county on October 6, 1960. This apparently is the first record of this midge west of New Mexico. Surveys at the time of the initial discovery indicate that it is firmly established in Tulare County and is also present in Madera, Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties.
Disease of corn, sorghum, and sudangrass head smut established in California
by Philip M. Halisky, Dale G. Smeltzer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Head smut—Sphacelotheca reiliana—a soil-borne fungus disease, which can not be controlled by chemical seed treatment, is one of the most destructive enemies of corn, sorghum, and sudan-grass. It has become established in central California and appears to be increasing in severity and spreading in area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Head smut—Sphacelotheca reiliana—a soil-borne fungus disease, which can not be controlled by chemical seed treatment, is one of the most destructive enemies of corn, sorghum, and sudan-grass. It has become established in central California and appears to be increasing in severity and spreading in area.
Rapid method of estimating lime requirements of acid soils of California
by P. F. Pratt, F. L. Bair
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.
Leaf analysis as a guide to nitrogen fertilization of oranges
by W. W. Jones, T. W. Embleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A nitrogen fertilization program for oranges can affect fruit production, fruit quality, fruit size, and consequently the pack-out.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A nitrogen fertilization program for oranges can affect fruit production, fruit quality, fruit size, and consequently the pack-out.
Suspected virus disease rusty blotch of Japanese plums found throughout California
by T. S. Pine
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plum rusty blotch, a graft-transmissible disease of Japanese-type plums, has been observed on several commercial varieties throughout the plum-growing areas of California. During 1960 trees showing symptoms of plum rusty blotch were found in Fresno, Kern, Madera, Merced, Placer, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Stanislaus Sutter, Tulare, and Yuba counties. The disease has been noted on the varieties Elephant Heart, Howard's Miracle, Kelsey, Laroda, Late Santa Rosa, Redroy, and Santa Rosa. The transmitting agent is not known.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plum rusty blotch, a graft-transmissible disease of Japanese-type plums, has been observed on several commercial varieties throughout the plum-growing areas of California. During 1960 trees showing symptoms of plum rusty blotch were found in Fresno, Kern, Madera, Merced, Placer, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Stanislaus Sutter, Tulare, and Yuba counties. The disease has been noted on the varieties Elephant Heart, Howard's Miracle, Kelsey, Laroda, Late Santa Rosa, Redroy, and Santa Rosa. The transmitting agent is not known.
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California Agriculture, Vol. 15, No.1

Balance of soil moisture to meet plant growth requirements
January 1961
Volume 15, Number 1

Research articles

Climatic limitations on plant growth evaluated by balancing soil moisture against evaporation and transpiration
by Rodney J. Arkley, Rudolph Ulrich
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crop selection and soil management practices can be based on accurate estimates of evapotranspiration—water loss from the soil by direct evaporation and by plant transpiration—derived from climatic analysis. Growth of crop plants is dependent on the three major factors of soil, climate and management. Soil and management have been studied more thoroughly and are better understood than the factor of climate.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Crop selection and soil management practices can be based on accurate estimates of evapotranspiration—water loss from the soil by direct evaporation and by plant transpiration—derived from climatic analysis. Growth of crop plants is dependent on the three major factors of soil, climate and management. Soil and management have been studied more thoroughly and are better understood than the factor of climate.
New California pest sorghum midge found in San Joaquin Valley
by W. H. Lange, V. L. Marble, W. E. Pendery, V. E. Burton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The sorghum midge—Contarinia sor-ghicola (Coquillet)—the most important pest of grain sorghums in the Southern states—was found in Tulare county on October 6, 1960. This apparently is the first record of this midge west of New Mexico. Surveys at the time of the initial discovery indicate that it is firmly established in Tulare County and is also present in Madera, Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The sorghum midge—Contarinia sor-ghicola (Coquillet)—the most important pest of grain sorghums in the Southern states—was found in Tulare county on October 6, 1960. This apparently is the first record of this midge west of New Mexico. Surveys at the time of the initial discovery indicate that it is firmly established in Tulare County and is also present in Madera, Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties.
Disease of corn, sorghum, and sudangrass head smut established in California
by Philip M. Halisky, Dale G. Smeltzer
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Head smut—Sphacelotheca reiliana—a soil-borne fungus disease, which can not be controlled by chemical seed treatment, is one of the most destructive enemies of corn, sorghum, and sudan-grass. It has become established in central California and appears to be increasing in severity and spreading in area.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Head smut—Sphacelotheca reiliana—a soil-borne fungus disease, which can not be controlled by chemical seed treatment, is one of the most destructive enemies of corn, sorghum, and sudan-grass. It has become established in central California and appears to be increasing in severity and spreading in area.
Rapid method of estimating lime requirements of acid soils of California
by P. F. Pratt, F. L. Bair
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The majority of soils in California are alkaline or, at least, not sufficiently acid to need lime. However, there are areas in the state where soils are naturally acid and other areas where continued use of ammonium fertilizers has produced acid conditions. The acidity of some of the soils is sufficient—pH values less than 5—to indicate that many crops should give higher yields when limed.
Leaf analysis as a guide to nitrogen fertilization of oranges
by W. W. Jones, T. W. Embleton
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: A nitrogen fertilization program for oranges can affect fruit production, fruit quality, fruit size, and consequently the pack-out.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: A nitrogen fertilization program for oranges can affect fruit production, fruit quality, fruit size, and consequently the pack-out.
Suspected virus disease rusty blotch of Japanese plums found throughout California
by T. S. Pine
| Full text HTML  | PDF  
Summary Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plum rusty blotch, a graft-transmissible disease of Japanese-type plums, has been observed on several commercial varieties throughout the plum-growing areas of California. During 1960 trees showing symptoms of plum rusty blotch were found in Fresno, Kern, Madera, Merced, Placer, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Stanislaus Sutter, Tulare, and Yuba counties. The disease has been noted on the varieties Elephant Heart, Howard's Miracle, Kelsey, Laroda, Late Santa Rosa, Redroy, and Santa Rosa. The transmitting agent is not known.
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Plum rusty blotch, a graft-transmissible disease of Japanese-type plums, has been observed on several commercial varieties throughout the plum-growing areas of California. During 1960 trees showing symptoms of plum rusty blotch were found in Fresno, Kern, Madera, Merced, Placer, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Stanislaus Sutter, Tulare, and Yuba counties. The disease has been noted on the varieties Elephant Heart, Howard's Miracle, Kelsey, Laroda, Late Santa Rosa, Redroy, and Santa Rosa. The transmitting agent is not known.

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